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Technical Paper

Evaluating a Vehicle Climate Control System with a Passive Sensor Manikin coupled with a Thermal Comfort Model

2018-04-03
2018-01-0065
In a previous study, a passive sensor (HVAC) manikin coupled with a human thermal model was used to predict the thermal comfort of human test participants. The manikin was positioned among the test participants while they were collectively exposed to a mild transient heat up within a thermally asymmetric chamber. Ambient conditions were measured using the HVAC manikin’s distributed sensor system, which measures air velocity, air temperature, radiant heat flux, and relative humidity. These measurements were supplied as input to a human thermal model to predict thermophysiological response and subsequently thermal sensation and comfort. The model predictions were shown to accurately reproduce the group trends and the “time to comfort” at which a transition occurred from a state of thermal discomfort to comfort. In the current study, the effectiveness of using a coupled HVAC manikin-model system to evaluate a vehicle climate control system was investigated.
Journal Article

Coupling a Passive Sensor Manikin with a Human Thermal Comfort Model to Predict Human Perception in Transient and Asymmetric Environments

2017-03-28
2017-01-0178
Passive sensor (HVAC) manikins have been developed to obtain high-resolution measurements of environmental conditions across a representative human body form. These manikins incorporate numerous sensors that measure air velocity, air temperature, radiant heat flux, and relative humidity. The effect of a vehicle’s climate control system on occupant comfort can be characterized from the data collected by an HVAC manikin. Equivalent homogeneous temperature (EHT) is often used as a first step in a cabin comfort analysis, particularly since it reduces a large data set to a single intuitive number. However, the applicability of the EHT for thermal comfort assessment is limited since it does not account for human homeostasis, i.e., that the human body actively counter-balances heat flow with the environment to maintain a constant core temperature. For this reason, a thermo-physiological human model is required to accurately simulate the body’s dynamic response to a changing environment.
Technical Paper

Organic Evolution of Development Organizations - An Experience Report

2016-04-05
2016-01-0028
In areas such as Active Safety, new technologies, designs (e.g. AUTOSAR) and methods are introduced at a rapid pace. To address the new demands, and also requirements on Functional Safety imposed by ISO 26262, the support for engineering methods, including tools and data management, needs to evolve as well. Generic and file-based data management tools, like spreadsheet tools, are popular in the industry due to their flexibility and legacy in the industry but provide poor control and traceability, while rigid and special-purpose tools provide structure and control of data but with limited evolvability. As organizations become agile, the need for flexible data management increases. Since products become more complex and developed in larger and distributed teams, the need for more unified, controlled, and consistent data increases.
Technical Paper

Improving Subjective Assessment of Vehicle Dynamics Evaluations by means of Computer-Tablets as Digital Aid

2016-04-05
2016-01-1629
Vehicle dynamics development relies on subjective assessments (SA), which is a resource-intensive procedure requiring both expert drivers and vehicles. Furthermore, development projects becoming shorter and more complex, and increasing demands on quality require higher efficiency. Most research in this area has focused on moving from physical to virtual testing. However, SA remains the central method. Less attention has been given to provide better tools for the SA process itself. One promising approach is to introduce computer-tablets to aid data collection, which has proven to be useful in medical studies. Simple software solutions can eliminate the need to transcribe data and generate more flexible and better maintainable questionnaires. Tablets’ technical features envision promising enhancements of SA, which also enable better correlations to objective metrics, a requirement to improve CAE evaluations.
Technical Paper

Wake and Unsteady Surface-Pressure Measurements on an SUV with Rear-End Extensions

2015-04-14
2015-01-1545
Previous research on both small-scale and full-scale vehicles shows that base extensions are an effective method to increase the base pressure, enhancing pressure recovery and reducing the wake size. These extensions decrease drag at zero yaw, but show an even larger improvement at small yaw angles. In this paper, rear extensions are investigated on an SUV in the Volvo Cars Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel with focus on the wake flow and on the unsteady behavior of the surface pressures near the base perimeter. To increase the effect of the extensions on the wake flow, the investigated configurations have a closed upper- and lower grille (closed-cooling) and the underbody has been smoothed with additional panels. This paper aims to analyze differences in flow characteristics on the wake of an SUV at 0° and 2.5° yaw, caused by different sets of extensions attached to the base perimeter. Extensions with several lengths are investigated with and without a kick.
Technical Paper

Severe Frontal Collisions with Partial Overlap - Two Decades of Car Safety Development

2013-04-08
2013-01-0759
Frontal Severe Partial Overlap Collisions (SPOC) also called small overlap crashes pose special challenges with respect to structural design as well as occupant protection. In the early 1990s, the SPOC test method was developed addressing 20-40% overlap against a fixed rigid barrier with initial velocities up to 65 km/h. The knowledge gained has been used in the design of Volvo vehicles since then. Important design principles include front side members orientated along the wheel envelopes together with a strong support structure utilizing a space frame principle with beams loaded mainly in tension and compression. This novel setup was first introduced in the 850-model in 1991 and has been refined and patented (2001) in later Volvo front structures. Among the design principles are multiple front side members on each side, helping energy absorption efficiency and robustness.
Journal Article

A Study on Acoustical Time-Domain Two-Ports Based on Digital Filters with Application to Automotive Air Intake Systems

2011-05-17
2011-01-1522
Analysis of pressure pulsations in ducts is an active research field within the automotive industry. The fluid dynamics and the wave transmission properties of internal combustion (IC) engine intake and exhaust systems contribute to the energy efficiency of the engines and are hence important for the final amount of CO₂ that is emitted from the vehicles. Sound waves, originating from the pressure pulses caused by the in- and outflow at the engine valves, are transmitted through the intake and exhaust system and are an important cause of noise pollution from road traffic at low speeds. Reliable prediction methods are of major importance to enable effective optimization of gas exchange systems. The use of nonlinear one-dimensional (1D) gas dynamics simulation software packages is widespread within the automotive industry. These time-domain codes are mainly used to predict engine performance parameters such as output torque and power but can also give estimates of radiated orifice noise.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Simulation of Peak Load Events Using Adams - Driving Over a Curb and Skid Against a Curb

2011-04-12
2011-01-0733
The durability peak load events Driving over a curb and Skid against a curb have been simulated in Adams for a Volvo S80. Simulated responses in the front wheel suspension have been validated by comparison with measurements. Due to the extreme nature of the peak load events, the component modeling is absolutely critical for the accuracy of the simulations. All components have to be described within their full range of excitation. Key components and behaviors to model have been identified as tire with wheel strike-through, contacts between curb and tire and between curb and rim, flexibility of structural components, bump stops, bushings, shock absorbers, and camber stiffness of the suspension. Highly non-linear component responses are captured in Adams. However, since Adams only allows linear material response for flexible bodies, the proposed methods to simulate impact loads are only valid up to small, plastic strains.
Technical Paper

Testing and Verification of Adaptive Cruise Control and Collision Warning with Brake Support by Using HIL Simulations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0728
This paper presents how hardware in the loop (HIL) simulations have been used for testing during the development of the adaptive cruise control (ACC) and collision warning with brake support (CWBS) functions implemented in the Volvo S80. Both the brake system controller and the controller where the ACC and CWBS functions were implemented were tested. The HIL simulator was used for automated batch simulations in which different controller software releases were analyzed from both system, fail-safe and functional performance perspectives. This paper presents the challenges and the benefits of using HIL simulations when developing distributed active safety functions. Some specific simulation results are analyzed and discussed. The conclusion shows that although it is difficult and time-consuming to develop a complete HIL simulation environment for active safety functions such as ACC and CWBS, the benefits justify the investment.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Hazard Identification Methods in the Automotive Domain

2006-10-16
2006-21-0045
Many automotive electronic systems must be developed using a safety process. A preliminary hazard analysis is a first and an important step in such a process. This experimental study evaluates two methods for hazard identification using an electrical steering column lock system. Both methods are found to be applicable for hazard identification in an automotive context. It is also concluded that the induction with the failure modes method is less time consuming and easier to use than the method based on induction with generic low level hazards. Further, two proposals are presented to improve efficiency and consistency, reuse of generic hazards by component profiles and a domain specific catalogue of vehicle phases.
Technical Paper

A Method for Estimating the Benefit of Autonomous Braking Systems Using Traffic Accident Data

2006-04-03
2006-01-0473
One way of avoiding crashes or mitigating the consequences of a crash is to apply an autonomous braking system. Quantifying the benefit of such a system in terms of injury reduction is a challenge. At the same time it is a fundamental input into the vehicle development process. This paper describes a method to estimate the effectiveness of reducing speed prior to impact. A holistic view of quantifying the benefit is presented, based on existing real life crash data and basic dynamic theories. It involves a systematic and new way of examining accident data in order to extract information concerning pre-crash situations. One problem area when implementing collision mitigation systems is being able to achieve sufficient target discrimination. The results from the case study highlight frontal impact situations from real world accident data that have the greatest potential in terms of improving accident outcome.
Technical Paper

The Door Mounted Inflatable Curtain

2006-04-03
2006-01-1437
It has been shown that Inflatable Curtains have the potential to reduce head injuries in side impacts and the system has accordingly been introduced on a growing number of car models. There is also a potential benefit in rollover situations. This paper only consider performance in situations with belted occupants. To date, it has not been possible to implement an Inflatable Curtain in convertible vehicles because they lack a roof. The challenge of the Door Mounted Inflatable Curtain (DMIC) has been to overcome the lack of support and fixation possibilities offered by a roof. This paper includes a description of the DMIC and how it was integrated into the vehicle structure. The paper will also show how to create the space and support needed to utilize the internal stiffness and make it possible to fill the bag in time. The impact attenuation and ejection protection functions of the DMIC will be demonstrated.
Technical Paper

Digital Human Models' Appearance Impact on Observers' Ergonomic Assessment

2005-06-14
2005-01-2722
The objective of this paper is to investigate whether different appearance modes of the digital human models (DHM or manikins) affect the observers when judging a working posture. A case where the manikin is manually assembling a battery in the boot with help of a lifting device is used in the experiment. 16 different pictures were created and presented for the subjects. All pictures have the same background, but include a unique posture and manikin appearance combination. Four postures and four manikin appearances were used. The subjects were asked to rank the pictures after ergonomic assessment based on posture of the manikin. Subjects taking part in the study were either manufacturing engineering managers, simulation engineers or ergonomists. Results show that the different appearance modes affect the ergonomic judgment. A more realistic looking manikin is rated higher than the very same posture visualized with a less natural appearance.
Technical Paper

Development of a Haptic Intervention System for Unintended Lane Departure

2003-03-03
2003-01-0282
Many accidents are road departures because of the drivers' lack of attention. This is in many cases due to distraction, drowsiness or intoxication. The Haptic Lane Departure Warning System described here is intended as an active safety system, thus aiming at decreasing the amount of unwanted lane departures. The challenge in the development of such kinds of functions lies in the determination of dangerous situations and the design of appropriate warning/intervention strategies. The system is intended to go unnoticed with the driver and intervenes only in instances where the driver mismanages steering control. Unlike systems which issue an audible sound, the type of warning is a tactile feedback via the steering wheel. This torque is designed in a way that it communicates to the driver the appropriate steering wheel angle required in order to come back in lane.
Technical Paper

Decision Making for Collision Avoidance Systems

2002-03-04
2002-01-0403
Driver errors cause a majority of all car accidents. Forward collision avoidance systems aim at avoiding, or at least mitigating, host vehicle frontal collisions, of which rear-end collisions are one of the most common. This is done by either warning the driver or braking or steering away, respectively, where each action requires its own considerations and design. We here focus on forward collision by braking, and present a general method for calculating the risk for collision. A brake maneuver is activated to mitigate the accident when the probability of collision is one, taking all driver actions into considerations. We describe results from a simulation study using a large number of scenarios, created from extensive accident statistics. We also show some results from an implementation of a forward collision avoidance system in a Volvo V70. The system has been tested in real traffic, and in collision scenarios (with an inflatable car) showing promising results.
Technical Paper

Multi-material Approach with Integrated Joining Technologies in the New Volvo S80

1999-09-28
1999-01-3147
In May 1998 Volvo launched its most exclusive car model so far, the Volvo S80, which is aimed to compete with upper luxury segment products. The car is produced in the new production facility in the Torslanda plant in Sweden. Among the more highlighted features were a transversely mounted in-line six cylinder engine with a specially designed gearbox, electronic multiplex technology with 18 computers in the network, and safety features like stability and traction control (STC), front seats with integrated antiwhiplash system (WHIPS) and inflatable curtain (IC) for improved side impact protection. To fulfill the product's high demands on safety, quality and environmental care, the design, materials selection and assembly of the car body with high precision had to be very carefully engineered. As in previous product-/process development a holistic and concurrent engineering approach was necessary.
Technical Paper

European Side-markers Effect on Traffic Safety

1999-03-01
1999-01-0091
In 1993 new European legislation regarding side-markers for passenger cars became effective. Volvo requested the TNO-Human Factors Research Institute (HFRI) to investigate the possible safety benefit of this European side-markers configuration. A test panel at TNO- HFRI was used to determine the difference in response time and detection error of drivers, confronted with slides of vehicles with and without the mentioned new vehicle side-marker configuration in several visibility conditions, crossing illumination and different vehicle approach angles. The investigation showed a significant faster vehicle recognition with less detection errors in case the approaching car was equipped with the bright amber side-markers. This improved vehicle conspicuity can be a benefit in crash avoidance, especially when the driver approaches a crossing with complex light environment and reduced visibility.
Technical Paper

The Inflatable Curtain (IC) - A New Head Protection System in Side Impacts

1998-05-31
986180
Car accident investigations have shown that the head, the chest and the abdomen are the three most vulnerable body regions in side impacts, when serious-to-fatal (MAIS 3-6) injuries are considered. Injuries are much more common to occupants seated on the struck side than to those on the non-struck side. The development of new side impact protection systems has therefore been focused on struck side occupants. The first airbag system for side impact protection, jointly developed by Volvo and Autoliv, was introduced on the market in 1994. The SIPS bag is seat-mounted and protects mainly the chest and the abdomen, and also to some extent the head, since the head's lateral relative displacement is reduced by the side airbag, thereby keeping the head inside the car's outer profile. However, if an external object is exposed in the head area, for example in a truck-to-car side impact or in a single car collision into a pole or a tree, there is a need for an additional head protection device.
Technical Paper

Passenger AIR-BAG Status Indication Awareness Study

1997-02-24
970276
With the growing concern about the potential dangers with rear facing child seats placed in the front seat of passenger airbag equipped cars, various systems are being considered for deactivation of the airbag. To increase the awareness of and confidence in these proposed systems, information displays were developed for the purpose of telling the status of the passenger airbag system and to warn when necessary. A study of the effectiveness, understanding and acceptance of a selection of such information displays was jointly undertaken by Volvo Car Corporation, SAAB Automobile AB and the Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute. Respondents of various age and demographic composition, parents and grand parents of small children, were exposed to six different sets of information displays and were asked to interpret them and also rank which information displays that would most clearly convey the message.
Technical Paper

A Study of Ground Simulation-Correlation between Wind-Tunnel and Water-Basin Tests of a Full-Scale Car

1989-02-01
890368
The aerodynamic properties of a full-scale car have been investigated in a wind-tunnel with upstream boundary layer suction, and in a water-basin where the car was rolling on the bottom. Measurements were carried out of the drag and lift forces, the static pressure distribution on the car body and the total head distribution between the car and the ground. By comparing data from the tunnel and the basin the ground simulation technique could be evaluated. The measured drag coefficients were found to be very similar in both facilities, while the absolute values of the lift coefficients were considerably higher in the tunnel. Lift differences due to configuration changes of the upperbody were essentially the same in the two facilities, while changes of the underbody caused smaller lift differences in the tunnel. In the project the water-basin technique was thoroughly investigated and proven.
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