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Technical Paper

Effects of Oil Aging on Laboratory Measurement of Emissions from a Legacy Heavy-duty Diesel Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-1163
Diesel engines are highly reliable, durable and are used for a wide range of applications with low fuel usage owing to its higher thermal efficiency compared to other mobile power sources. Heavy-duty diesel engines are used for both on-road and off-road applications and dominate the heavy-duty engine segment of the United States transportation market. Due to their high reliability, there are considerable numbers of on-road legacy heavy-duty diesel engine fleets still in use in the United States. These engines are relatively higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) producers than post 2007 model year diesel engines. There have been various emission certification or verification programs which are carried out in states like California and Texas for different aftermarket retrofit devices, fuels and additive technologies for reducing NOx and PM emissions from these legacy diesel engines.
Technical Paper

In-Cylinder Combustion Pressure Characteristics of Fischer-Tropsch and Conventional Diesel Fuels in a Heavy Duty CI Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1472
The emissions reduction benefits of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel have been shown in several recent published studies in both engine testing and in-use vehicle testing. FT diesel fuel shows significant advantages in reducing regulated engine emissions over conventional diesel fuel primarily to: its zero sulfur specification, implying reduced particulate matter (PM) emissions, its relatively lower aromaticity, and its relatively high cetane rating. However, the actual effect of FT diesel formulation on the in-cylinder combustion characteristics of unmodified modern heavy-duty diesel engines is not well documented. As a result, a Navistar T444E (V8, 7.3 liter) engine, instrumented for in-cylinder pressure measurement, was installed on an engine dynamometer and subjected to steady-state emissions measurement using both conventional Federal low sulfur pump diesel and a natural gas-derived FT fuel.
Technical Paper

Investigation of a Radio Frequency Plasma Ignitor for Possible Internal Combustion Engine Use

1997-02-24
970071
This paper outlines the development process of a radio frequency (RF) plasma ignitor and its application to internal combustion engines. The system features a high Q quarter-wave coaxial cavity resonator that serves as an electric field magnifier and as a discharge device. The preliminary characteristics of the cavity have been studied by the construction and operation of larger scaled devices. Testing has been performed using these devices in a testing apparatus operating under ambient conditions. Once an analysis of the large-scale device is complete, a smaller device, more inclined to interfacing with a standard engine, will be constructed and tested on a full scale engine. The final device is intended to operate in the 800-1500 MHz range.
Technical Paper

Zero Dimensional Combustion Modeling of an Axial Vane Rotary Engine

1997-02-24
970069
A zero dimensional combustion model of an axial vane rotary engine has been developed. The engine is a positive displacement mechanism that permits the four “stroke” action to occur in one revolution of the shaft with a minimum number of moving components. Current modeling efforts for this engine require improved estimations of engine parameters such as chamber pressure, chamber wall temperature, gas temperature, and heat loss. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a zero dimensional combustion model that predicts the above-mentioned parameters in a quick and accurate manner for a spark ignition or compression ignition version of the engine. For this effort, NASA's ZMOTTO code was modified. Piston engine data and the results from the modified ZMOTTO code are in good agreement.
Technical Paper

Crash Analysis Response of a Midsize Car Subjected to Side Impact

1997-02-24
970783
Crashworthiness is a measure of a vehicle's structural integrity during mechanical impact and of its ability to absorb energy and provide occupant protection in crash situations. Finite element modeling has been successfully used to simulate collision events; the present work uses these techniques to simulate the side impact of a mid-size car in order to investigate the crash characteristics of a 45 km/hr impact. Five different analyses were conducted on orthogonal and oblique impacts under varying conditions. The numerical results from the first analysis were compared with published experimental crash results, showing favorable comparisons for this numerical model prediction.
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