Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 11 of 11
Technical Paper

The Effect of Cerium Oxide Nano Particles Fuel Additive on Performance, Combustion, NOx Reduction and Nano Particle Emission of Karanja and Jatropha Biodiesel in a Military 585 kW CIDI Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0262
Rapid depletion of petroleum reserves, stringent emission legislations and global warming has given us an opportunity to find biodiesel as an alternative to diesel fuel. Biodiesel is a biogradable, renewable, sulphur free, non-toxic, and oxygenated green fuel. Recent emission legislations have also restricted the nano particles emission in addition to particulate matter, due to their adverse impact on health. Karanja and Jatropha oils are non-edible vegetable oils. Karanja and Jatropha oil methyl ester biodiesel are prepared by the process of transesterification. Biodiesel emits lesser gaseous emission as compared to diesel fuel. However, the only major concern in the use of biodiesel is that it increases NOx emission. Nano particle fuel additive is one of the essential techniques to overcome the NOx emission drawback of biodiesel.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Karanja Oil Biodiesel with Cerium Oxide Nano Particle Fuel Additive on Lubricating Oil Tribology and Engine Wear in a Heavy Duty 38.8L,780 HP Military CIDI Diesel Engine

2018-09-10
2018-01-1753
Biodiesel fuels are an alternative to diesel fuel. Biodiesel is an oxygenated, sulphur free, non-toxic, biogradable and renewable fuel. It is derived from vegetable oils. Since straight vegetable oils have quite high viscosity compared to mineral diesel, they have to be modified to bring their combustion-related properties and viscosity closer to mineral diesel. This is done by modifying their molecular structure through a transesterification process. In the present study, a military heavy duty 38.8 liter, 585 kW supercharged, compression ignition diesel injection (CIDI) engine was fuelled with diesel, Karanja oil methyl ester (KOME) biodiesel, and KOME biodiesel with cerium oxide fuel additive, respectively. These were subjected to 100 hours long term endurance tests. Lubricating oil samples, drawn from the engine fuelled with these fuels after a fixed interval of 20 hours, were subjected to elemental analysis.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Cerium Oxide Nano Particles Fuel Additive on Performance and Emission of Karanja Biodiesel Fueled Compression Ignition Military 585kW Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

2018-09-10
2018-01-1818
Global warming with stringent emission legislation along with the depletion of fossil fuel has given us an opportunity to find biodiesel as alternative to diesel fuel. Biodiesel has been widely accepted as comparable fuel to diesel in diesel engine. This is due to its renewable property, better lubricity, along with lesser gaseous emission as compared to diesel fuel. However, there is a major disadvantage in the use of biodiesel as it increases NOx emission. Fuel additive becomes one of the essential tools to overcome the drawback of biodiesel required to meet the international standard of performance and emission. In this study, the performance, combustion, and gaseous emission of CO, CO2, HC, NOx and PM including particle size number distribution characteristics, were compared for diesel, Karanja oil biodiesel, and Karanja oil biodiesel with Cerium Oxide Nano particles fuel additive, in a 12 cylinder, 585 kW, CIDI military diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Comparison and Evaluation of Performance, Combustion, NOx Reduction and Nano Particle Emission of Diesel, Jatropha and Karanja Oil Methyl Ester Biodiesel in a Military 38.8 L CIDI Engine Applying EGR with Turbo Charging

2018-04-03
2018-01-0919
Stringent emission legislations, brought in due to global warming and rapid depletion of petroleum reserves, have given us the opportunity to find bio fuels. Biodiesel is an alternative to diesel fuel that can be produced from feedstock such as edible and non-edible vegetable oils, bio-mass, wasted frying oils and animal fats. Biodiesel is green, renewable, sulphur free, non-toxic, and oxygenated biogradable fuel. Jatropha and Karanja oils are non- edible vegetable oils. Jatropha and Karanja biodiesel are prepared using methanol by the process of transesterification. JOME and KOME biodiesel were found to be highly compatible alternative fuels. JOME and KOME have comparable performance with low emission characteristics, except for NOx emission, in comparison to diesel fuel. Most recent emission legislations also restrict the total number of nano particles emitted in addition to particulate matter, due to the adverse health impact.
Technical Paper

Comparison and Evaluation of Engine Wear, Combustion and Emissions Performance between Diesel, Karanja and Jatropha Oil Methyl Ester Biodiesel in a 780 hp Military Diesel Engine

2014-04-01
2014-01-1395
The rapid depletion of petroleum reserves and stringent emission legislation due to global warming has compelled us to pursue alternative fuels. Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel that can be produced from renewable feedstock such as edible and non-edible vegetable oils, wasted frying oils and animal fats. Biodiesel is an oxygenated, sulphur free, non-toxic, biogradable and renewable fuel. In the present study, a military 585 kW compression ignition diesel injection (CIDI) engine was fuelled with diesel, Karanja oil methyl ester (KOME) and Jatropha oil methyl ester (JOME) biodiesel respectively. These were subjected to 100 hours long term endurance tests. Lubricating oil samples drawn from engine after a fixed interval (20 hours) were subjected to elemental analysis. Metal debris concentration analysis was done by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Lubricating oil samples were also subjected to ferrography test.
Technical Paper

Comparison and Evaluation of Wear, Performance and Emission of Diesel, Karanja Oil Biodiesel and JP-8 in a Military 585 kW CIDI Engine

2013-10-14
2013-01-2658
Investigating the impact of Karanja oil biodiesel and JP-8 fuel on diesel engine performance, emission and wear are very important for military track and wheeled vehicles due to their great potential as alternative fuels. In the present study, a military 585 kW CIDI engine was fuelled and tested with diesel, Karanja oil biodiesel and JP-8 respectively. The performances of fuels were evaluated in terms of brake horse power, specific fuel consumption, brake specific energy consumption, brake mean effective pressure, thermal efficiency and heat release rates. The emission of carbon monoxide (CO), unburnt hydrocarbon (UHC), and oxides of nitrogen NOx with the three fuels were also compared. Both Karanja oil, after transesterification and JP-8 exhibit the properties (density, viscosity and calorific value) within acceptable limits of ASTM standard. Performance of both JP-8 and pure Karanja oil biodiesel were slightly lower than diesel.
Technical Paper

Wear Assessment in a Karanja Oil Methyl Ester Biodiesel Fueled 38.8 L Military CIDI Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-1192
Karanja biodiesel is prepared using Karanja oil and methanol by the process of transesterification. Use of Karanja oil methyl ester (KOME) in a 780 hp CIDI military engine was found to be a highly compatible alternative fuel with low emission characteristics. Engine was operated for 100 hours each using pure karanja biodiesel and mineral diesel fuel, respectively. These were subjected to long-term endurance tests. Lubricating oil samples, drawn from both fuelled engine after a fixed interval of 20 hours, were subjected to elemental analysis. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was done for quantification of various metal debris concentrations. Wear metals were found lower for a biodiesel operated engine system. Lubricating oil samples were also subjected to ferrography indicating lower wear debris concentrations for a biodiesel-operated engine. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted on the cylinder liner surfaces exposed to wear.
Technical Paper

Performance and Emission Characteristics of a 780 hp CIDI Military Diesel Engine Operated on Karanja Oil Methyl Ester Biodiesel Applying EGR with Supercharging

2011-04-12
2011-01-0639
Global warming due to increasing pollution and rapid depletion in petroleum reserves has given us opportunity to find bio fuels. Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel that can be produced from renewable feedstock such as edible and non-edible vegetable oils, waste frying oils, and animal fats. Biodiesel is an oxygenated, sulphur free, non-toxic, biogradable, and renewable fuel. The diesel performance and emission characteristics depend upon the fuel properties such as cetane number, density, low caloric value, and kinematic viscosity. In this experiment, 12 cylinders, 780hp CIDI military diesel engine performance and emission characteristics from non-edible karanja oil methyl ester (KOME) biodiesel and diesel fuel were compared by applying EGR with supercharging. The test results showed that the engine performance of karanja oil methyl ester biodiesel fuel was similar to that of diesel fuel.
Technical Paper

Comparison and Evaluation of Performance, Combustion and Emissions of Diesel, Jatropha and Karanja Oil Methyl Ester Biodiesel in a Military 780 hp CIDI Engine

2010-10-25
2010-01-2138
The depleting fossil fuel resources and stringent emission legislation due to global warming have driven the engine technology towards the search for alternative fuels for diesel engines. In the present study, a military 780 hp CIDI engine was fuelled with diesel, jatropha oil methyl ester (JOME) and karanja oil methyl ester (KOME) biodiesel respectively. The performances of fuels were evaluated in terms of power out put, specific fuel consumption and heat release rates. The emission of carbon monoxide (CO), unburnt hydrocarbon (UHC), and oxides of nitrogen NOx with the three fuels were also compared. Both karanja and jatropha oil, after transesterification exhibit the properties within acceptable limits of ASTM standard. Performance of both KOME and JOME were slightly lower than diesel. Emissions of CO, and UHC were found lower with both KOME and JOME as compared to diesel fuel, but with slightly higher NOx emission.
Journal Article

Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Esterified Karanja Oil Biodiesel on Lubricating Oil and Wear of a 780 hp Military CIDI Engine

2010-05-05
2010-01-1521
Global warming due to exhaust pollution and rapid depletion of petroleum reserves, has given us opportunity to find bio fuels. Bio diesel is an alternative diesel fuel that can be produced from renewable feedstock such as edible and non-edible vegetable oils, wasted frying oils and animal fats. Bio diesel is an oxygenated, sulphur free, non-toxic, biogradable and renewable fuel. Use of karanja oil methyl ester (KOME) biodiesel in a compression ignition engine was found highly compatible with engine performance along with low emission characteristics. A Military 780 hp, CIDI engine was operated using biodiesel (KOME) and diesel fuel respectively. These were subjected to 100 hours long term endurance tests. Lubricating oil samples drawn from engine after a fixed interval (20 hours), were subjected to elemental analysis. Metal debris concentration analysis was done by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Wear of metals were found to be about 30% lower for biodiesel operated engine.
Journal Article

Performance, Emission and Pump Wear Analysis of JP-8 Fuel for Military Use on a 558 kW, CIDI Diesel Engine

2010-05-05
2010-01-1518
Investigating the impact of JP-8 fuel on diesel engine performance and emission is very important for military combat vehicles, due to its great potential as alternative fuel under single fuel strategy program for military operation. There is a known torque, horsepower and fuel economy penalty associated with the operation of a diesel engine with JP-8 fuel. On the other hand, a few experimental studies have suggested that JP-8 fuels have the potential for lowering exhaust emissions, especially NOx, CO, HC and smoke opacity compared to diesel fuel. This research evaluates the effect of using JP-8 fuel in a heavy duty diesel engine on performance, emission, and pump wear, and subsequently proposes change to the fuel injection pump calibration to match the designed required operational engine performance with diesel fuel. Experiments were carried out on a 558 kW, B-46-6, supercharged, 12-cylinders, CIDI engine with a hydraulic dynamometer.
X