Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Technical Paper

Dual-Fuel Ethanol-Diesel Technology Applied in Mild and Full Hybrid Powertrains

2019-09-09
2019-24-0115
The increasingly stringent emissions regulations together with the demand of highly efficient vehicles from the customers lead to rapid developments of distinct powertrain solutions, especially when electrification is present in a certain degree. The combination of electric machines with conventional powertrains diversifies the powertrain architectures and brings the opportunity to save energy in greater extents. On the other hand, alternative combustion modes as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) have shown to provide simultaneous ultra-low NOx and soot emissions with similar or better thermal efficiency than conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Therefore, the combination of both growing technologies could be a way to achieve clean and efficient vehicles.
Technical Paper

PIV and DBI Experimental Characterization of Air flow-Spray Interaction and Soot Formation in a Single Cylinder Optical Diesel Engine Using a Real Bowl Geometry Piston

2019-09-09
2019-24-0100
With demanding emissions legislations and the need for higher efficiency, new technologies for compression ignition engines are in development. One of them relies on reducing the heat losses of the engine during the combustion process as well as to devise injection strategies that reduce soot formation. Therefore, it is necessary a better comprehension about the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) distribution inside the cylinder and how it is affected by the interaction between air flow motion and fuel spray. Furthermore, new diesel engines are characterized by massive decrease of NOx emissions. Therefore, considering the well-known NOx-soot trade-off, it is necessary a better comprehension and overall quantification of soot formation and how the different injection strategies can impact it.
Technical Paper

Combined CFD - PIV Methodology for the Characterization of Air Flow in a Diesel Engine

2018-09-10
2018-01-1769
It is known that in-cylinder airflow structures during intake and compression strokes deeply affects the combustion process in compression ignition (CI) engines. This work presents a methodology for the analysis of the swirling structures by means of the CFD proprietary code Converge 2.3. The methodology is based on the CFD modelling and the comparison of results with in-cylinder velocity fields measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the accuracy evaluation of other methods available to define the flow in the cylinder of internal combustion engines, such as experiments in steady flow rigs. These methods, in junction with simple phenomenological models, have been traditionally used to determine some of the fundamental variables that define the in-cylinder flow in ICE engines. The CFD analysis is focused in the flow structures around top dead centre (TDC) at the end of the compression stroke.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation on Spray Mixing and Combustion Characteristics for Spray C/D Nozzles in a Constant Pressure Vessel

2018-09-10
2018-01-1783
The Engine Combustion Network (ECN) is a coordinate effort from research partners from all over the world which aims at creating a large experimental database to validate CFD calculations. Two injectors from ECN, namely Spray C and D, have been compared in a constant pressure flow vessel, which enables a field of view of more than 100 mm. Both nozzles have been designed with similar flow metrics, with Spray D having a convergent hole shape and Spray C a cylindrical one, the latter being therefore more prone to cavitation. Although the focus of the study is on reacting conditions, some inert cases have also been measured. High speed schlieren imaging, OH* chemiluminescence visualization and head-on broadband luminosity have been used as combustion diagnostics to evaluate ignition delay, lift off length and reacting tip penetration. Parametric variations include ambient temperature, oxygen content and injection pressure variations.
Technical Paper

Evaluating the Efficiency of a Conventional Diesel Oxidation Catalyst for Dual-Fuel RCCI Diesel-Gasoline Combustion

2018-09-10
2018-01-1729
Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion has demonstrated to be able to avoid the NOx-soot trade-off appearing during conventional diesel combustion (CDC), with similar or better thermal efficiency than CDC under a wide variety of engine platforms. However, a major challenge of this concept comes from the high hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, which are orders of magnitude higher than CDC and similar to those of port fuel injected (PFI) gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures during RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatment technologies. RCCI has been successfully implemented on different compression ignition engine platforms with only minor modifications on the combustion system to include a PFI for feeding the engine with the low reactivity fuel.
Technical Paper

Influence of Direct-Injected Fuel Properties on Performance and Emissions from a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Running Under RCCI Combustion Mode

2018-04-03
2018-01-0250
The dual-fuel combustion mode known as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) allows an effective control of the combustion process by means of modulating the in-cylinder fuel reactivity depending on the engine operating conditions. This strategy has been found to be able to avoid the NOx-soot trade-off appearing during conventional diesel combustion (CDC), with diesel-like or better thermal efficiency in a great part of the engine map. The role of the low reactivity fuel properties and engine settings over RCCI combustion has been widely investigated in literature, concluding that the direct-injected fuel injection timing is a key parameter for controlling the in-cylinder fuel stratification. From this, it can be inferred that the physical and chemical characteristics of the direct-injected fuel should have also an important role on the RCCI combustion process.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of the Engine Combustion Network ‘Spray B’ in a Light Duty Single Cylinder Optical Engine

2018-04-03
2018-01-0220
Engine Combustion Network promotes fundamental investigations on a number of different spray configurations with the goal of providing experimental results under highly controlled conditions for CFD validation. Most of the available experiments up to now have been obtained in spray vessels, which miss some of the interactions governing spray evolution in the combustion chamber of an engine, such as the jet wall interaction and the transient conditions in the combustion chamber. The main aim of the present research is to compare the results obtained with a three-hole, 90 μm injector, known as ECN’s Spray B, in these constant-volume vessels and more recent Heavy-Duty engines with those obtained in a Light Duty Single Cylinder Optical Engine, under inert and reactive conditions, using n-dodecane. In-cylinder conditions during the injection were estimated by means of a 1-D and 0-D model simulation, accounting for heat transfer and in-cylinder mass evolution.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Vortex Center Location Algorithms for Particle Image Velocimetry Data in an Optical Light-Duty Compression Ignition Engine

2018-04-03
2018-01-0209
Ever decreasing permitted emission levels and the necessity of more efficient engines demand a better understanding of in-cylinder phenomena. In swirl-supported compression ignition (CI) engines, mean in-cylinder flow structures formed during the intake stroke deeply influence mixture preparation prior to combustion, heat transfer and pollutant oxidation all of which could potentially improve engine performance. Therefore, the ability to characterize these mean flow structures is relevant for achieving performance improvements. CI mean flow structure is mainly described by a precessing vortex. The location of the vortex center is key for the characterization of the flow structure. Consequently, this work aims at evaluating algorithms that allow for the location of the vortex center both, in ensemble-averaged velocity fields and in instantaneous velocity fields.
Technical Paper

Soot Characterization of Diesel/Gasoline Blends Injected through a Single Injection System in CI engines

2017-09-04
2017-24-0048
In the past few years’ various studies have shown how the application of a highly premixed dual fuel combustion for CI engines leads a strong reduction for both pollutant emissions and fuel consumption. In particular a drastic soot and NOx reduction were achieved. In spite of the most common strategy for dual fueling has been represented by using two different injection systems, various authors are considering the advantages of using a single injection system to directly inject blends in the chamber. In this scenario, a characterization of the behavior of such dual-fuel blend spray became necessary, both in terms of inert and reactive ambient conditions. In this work, a light extinction imaging (LEI) has been performed in order to obtain two-dimensional soot distribution information within a spray flame of different diesel/gasoline commercial fuel blends. All the measurements were conducted in an optically accessible two-stroke engine equipped with a single-hole injector.
Journal Article

Particulates Size Distribution of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) on a Medium-Duty Engine Fueled with Diesel and Gasoline at Different Engine Speeds

2017-09-04
2017-24-0085
This work investigates the particulates size distribution of reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion, a dual-fuel concept which combines the port fuel injection of low-reactive/gasoline-like fuels with direct injection of highly reactive/diesel-like fuels. The particulates size distributions from 5-250 nm were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer at six engine speeds, from 950 to 2200 rpm, and 25% engine load. The same procedure was followed for conventional diesel combustion. The study was performed in a single-cylinder engine derived from a stock medium-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine of 15.3:1 compression ratio. The combustion strategy proposed during the tests campaign was limited to accomplish both mechanical and emissions constraints. The results confirms that reactivity controlled compression ignition promotes ultra-low levels of nitrogen oxides and smoke emissions in the points tested.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Spray Evaporation and Mixing Using Blends of Commercial Gasoline and Diesel Fuels in Engine-Like Conditions

2017-03-28
2017-01-0843
Recent studies have shown that the use of highly premixed dual fuel combustion reduces pollutant emissions and fuel consumption in CI engines. The most common strategy for dual fueling is to use two injection systems. Port fuel injection for low reactivity fuel and direct injection for high reactivity fuel. This strategy implies some severe shortcomings for its real implementation in passenger cars such as the use of two fuel tanks. In this sense, the use of a single injection system for dual fueling could solve this drawback trying to maintain pollutant and efficiency benefits. Nonetheless, when single injection system is used, the spray characteristics become an essential issue. In this work the fundamental characteristics of dual-fuel sprays with a single injection system under non-evaporating engine-like conditions are presented.
Journal Article

An Experimental Study on Diesel Spray Injection into a Non-Quiescent Chamber

2017-03-28
2017-01-0850
Visualization of single-hole nozzles into quiescent ambient has been used extensively in the literature to characterize spray mixing and combustion. However in-cylinder flow may have some meaningful impact on the spray evolution. In the present work, visualization of direct diesel injection spray under both non-reacting and reacting operating conditions was conducted in an optically accessible two-stroke engine equipped with a single-hole injector. Two different high-speed imaging techniques, Schlieren and UV-Light Absorption, were applied here to quantify vapor penetration for non-reacting spray. Meanwhile, Mie-scattering was used to measure the liquid length. As for reacting conditions, Schlieren and OH* chemiluminescence were simultaneously applied to obtain the spray tip penetration and flame lift-off length under the same TDC density and temperature. Additionally, PIV was used to characterize in-cylinder flow motion.
Journal Article

Study of Air Flow Interaction with Pilot Injections in a Diesel Engine by Means of PIV Measurements

2017-03-28
2017-01-0617
With ever-demanding emission legislations in Compression Ignition (CI) engines, new premixed combustion strategies have been developed in recent years seeking both, emissions and performance improvements. Since it has been shown that in-cylinder air flow affects the combustion process, and hence the overall engine performance, the study of swirling structures and its interaction with fuel injection are of great interest. In this regard, possible Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) distribution changes after fuel injection may be a key parameter for achieving performance improvements by reducing in-cylinder heat transfer. Consequently, this paper aims to gain an insight into spray-swirl interaction through the analysis of in-cylinder velocity fields measured by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) when PCCI conditions are proposed. Experiments are carried out in a single cylinder optical Diesel engine with bowl-in-piston geometry.
Journal Article

A Combination of Swirl Ratio and Injection Strategy to Increase Engine Efficiency

2017-03-28
2017-01-0722
Growing awareness about CO2 emissions and their environmental implications are leading to an increase in the importance of thermal efficiency as criteria to design internal combustion engines (ICE). Heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls contributes to a decrease in the indicated efficiency. A strategy explored in this study to mitigate this efficiency loss is to promote low swirl conditions in the combustion chamber by using low swirl ratios. A decrease in swirl ratio leads to a reduction in heat transfer, but unfortunately, it can also lead to worsening of combustion development and a decrease in the gross indicated efficiency. Moreover, pumping work plays also an important role due to the effect of reduced intake restriction to generate the swirl motion. Current research evaluates the effect of a dedicated injection strategy to enhance combustion process when low swirl is used.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of EGR Effect on the Global Energy Balance of a High Speed DI Diesel Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0646
Regulated emissions and fuel consumption are the main constraints affecting internal combustion engine (ICE) design. Over the years, many techniques have been used with the aim of meeting these limitations. In particular, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has proved to be an invaluable solution to reduce NOx emissions in Diesel engines, becoming a widely used technique in production engines. However, its application has a direct effect on fuel consumption due to both the changes in the in-cylinder processes, affecting indicated efficiency, and also on the air management. An analysis, based on the engine Global Energy Balance, is presented to thoroughly assess the behavior of a HSDI Diesel engine under variable EGR conditions at different operating points. The tests have been carried out keeping constant the conditions at the IVC and the combustion centering.
Journal Article

An Investigation of Radiation Heat Transfer in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

2015-09-06
2015-24-2443
In the last two decades engine research has been mainly focused on reducing pollutant emissions. This fact together with growing awareness about the impacts of climate change are leading to an increase in the importance of thermal efficiency over other criteria in the design of internal combustion engines (ICE). In this framework, the heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls can be considered as one of the main sources of indicated efficiency diminution. In particular, in modern direct-injection diesel engines, the radiation emission from soot particles can constitute a significant component of the efficiency losses. Thus, the main of objective of the current research was to evaluate the amount of energy lost to soot radiation relative to the input fuel chemical energy during the combustion event under several representative engine loads and speeds. Moreover, the current research characterized the impact of different engine operating conditions on radiation heat transfer.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of the Energy Balance in a DI Diesel Engine

2015-04-14
2015-01-1651
In recent years, the spread use of after-treatment systems together with the growing awareness about the climate change is leading to an increase in the importance of the efficiency over other criteria during the design of internal combustion engines. In this sense, it has been demonstrated that performing an energy balance is a suitable methodology to assess the potential of different injection or air management strategies, to reduce consumption as well as determining the more relevant energy terms that could be improved. In this work, an experimental energy balance with the corresponding comprehensive analysis is presented. The main objective is the identification of how the energy is split, considering internal and external balances. For this purpose, some parametric studies varying the coolant temperature, the intake air temperature and the start of the injection timing have been performed. The results quantify the effect of each parametrical study on engine efficiency.
Journal Article

Impact of Spark Assistance and Multiple Injections on Gasoline PPC Light Load

2014-10-13
2014-01-2669
Along the last years, engine researchers are more and more focusing their efforts on the advanced low temperature combustion (LTC) concepts with the aim of achieving the stringent limits of the current emission legislations. In this regard, several studies based on highly premixed combustion concepts such as HCCI has been confirmed as a promising way to decrease drastically the most relevant CI diesel engine-out emissions, NOx and soot. However, the major HCCI drawbacks are the narrow load range, bounded by either misfiring (low load, low speed) or hardware limitations (higher load, higher speeds) and the combustion control (cycle-to-cylce control and combustion phasing). Although several techniques have been widely investigated in order to overcome these drawbacks, the high chemical reactivity of the diesel fuel remains as the main limitation for the combustion control.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Emissions and Performances from Partially Premixed Compression Ignition Combustion using Gasoline and Spark Assistance

2013-04-08
2013-01-1664
Several new combustion concepts have been developed during last decade with the aim of reducing pollutant emissions. Specifically, these strategies allow a simultaneous reduction of NOx and soot emissions by reducing the local combustion temperatures, enhancing the fuel/air mixing (PCCI, HCCI…). In spite of their benefits, these concepts present difficulties controlling the appropriate combustion phasing as well as high knocking levels and therefore, their operating range is reduced to low-medium loads. In this work gasoline is considered as a fuel in order to improve combustion strategies based on fully or partially premixed combustion in CI engines. Its use provides more flexibility to achieve lean and low combustion temperature, however the concept has demonstrated difficulty under light load conditions using gasoline with ON up to 95.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of Diesel-Gasoline Blends Effects in a Direct-Injection Compression-Ignition Engine Operating in PCCI Conditions

2013-04-08
2013-01-1676
Compared to the gasoline engine, the diesel engine has the advantage of being more efficient and hence achieving a reduction of CO₂ levels. Unfortunately, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from diesel engines are high. To overcome these drawbacks, several new combustion concepts have been developed, including the PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) combustion mode. This strategy allows a simultaneous reduction of NOx and soot emissions through the reduction of local combustion temperatures and the enhancement of the fuel/air mixing. In spite of PCCI benefits, the concept is characterized by its high combustion noise levels. Currently, a promising way to improve the PCCI disadvantages is being investigated. It is related with the use of low cetane fuels such as gasoline and diesel-gasoline blends.
X