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Technical Paper

Potential to Reduce Nano-Particle Emission in SG-DISI Engine with Normal Butane

2019-09-09
2019-24-0022
Lean stratified combustion is a mean to dilute the fuel-air mixture leaner than stoichiometric ratio, by using stratification of fuel gradient in a spark ignition engine. Under the lean stratified combustion, differed from the stoichiometric homogeneous charge combustion, flame could propagate through extremely rich air-fuel mixture, while the global air-fuel mixture is under lean condition. The rich mixture causes considerable amount of particulate matter, but, due to large effect of efficiency improvement, the attractive point is on fuel economy compare to homogeneous charge SI combustion. The easiest way to reduce particulate matter is changing fuel to gaseous hydrocarbon, to minimize evaporating and mixing period.
Technical Paper

Particle Reduction in LPG Lean Stratified Combustion by Intake Strategies

2019-04-02
2019-01-0253
Lean stratified combustion shows high potential to reduce fuel consumption because it operates without the intervention of a throttle valve. Despite its high fuel economy potential, it emits large amounts of particulate matter (PM) because the locally rich mixture is formed at the periphery of a spark plug. Furthermore, the combustion phasing angle is not realized at MBT ignition timing, which can bring high work conversion efficiency. Since PM emission and work conversion efficiency are in a trade-off relation, this research focused on reducing PM emission through achieving high work conversion efficiency. Two intake air control strategies were examined in this research; throttle operation and late intake valve closing (LIVC). The experiment was conducted in a single cylinder spray-guided direct injection spark ignition (SG-DISI) engine with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The injected fuel amount was fixed so as to investigate the effect of each strategy.
Technical Paper

The Fuel Economy Improvement through the Knock Margin Expansion in a Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

2018-09-10
2018-01-1671
Knocking combustion limits the downsized gasoline engines’ potential for improvement with regard to fuel economy. The high in-cylinder pressure and temperature caused by the adaptation of a turbocharger aggravates the tendency of the end-gas to autoignite. Thus, the knocking combustion does not allow for further advancing of the combustion phase. In this research, the effects of the ignition and valve timings on knocking combustion were investigated under steady-state conditions. Moreover, the optimal ignition and valve timings for the transient operations were derived with the aim of a greater fuel economy improvement, based on the steady-state analysis. A 2.0 liter turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine with continuously variable valve timing (CVVT), was utilized for this experiment. 2, 10, and 18 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) load conditions were used to represent the low, medium, and high load operations, respectively.
Technical Paper

Effects of Hot and Cooled EGR for HC Reduction in a Dual-Fuel Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engine

2018-09-10
2018-01-1730
Most internal combustion engine makers have adopted after-treatment systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR), diesel particulate filter (DPF), and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), to meet emission regulations. However, as the emission regulations become stricter, the size of the after-treatment systems become larger. This aggravates the price competitiveness of engine systems and causes fuel efficiency to deteriorate due to the increased exhaust pressure. Dual-fuel premixed charge compression ignition (DF-PCCI) combustion, which is one of the advanced combustion technologies, makes it possible to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) during the combustion process, while keeping the combustion phase controllability as a conventional diesel combustion (CDC). However, DF-PCCI combustion produces high amounts of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions due to the bulk quenching phenomenon under low load conditions as a huddle of commercialization.
Technical Paper

Operating Characteristics of DME-Gasoline Dual-fuel in a Compression Ignition Engine at the Low Load Condition

2013-03-25
2013-01-0049
Combustion and emission characteristics were investigated in a compression ignition engine with dual-fuel strategy using dimethyl ether (DME) and gasoline. Experiments were performed at the low load condition corresponding to indicated mean effective pressure of 0.45 MPa. DME was directly injected into the cylinder and gasoline was injected into the intake manifold during the intake stroke. The proportion of DME in the total input energy was adjusted from 10% to 100%. DME DME injection timing was widely varied to investigate the effect of injection timing on the combustion phase. Injection pressure of DME was varied from 20 MPa to 60 MPa. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was controlled from 0% to 60% to explore the effect of EGR on the combustion and emission characteristics. As DME proportion was decreased with the increased portion of gasoline, the combustion efficiency was decreased but thermal efficiency was increased.
Technical Paper

Effects of Stratified EGR on the Performance of a Liquid Phase LPG Injection Engine

2004-03-08
2004-01-0982
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and lean burn utilize the diluents into the engine cylinder to control combustion leading to enhanced fuel economy and reduced emissions. However, the occurrence of excessive cyclic variation with high diluent rates, brings about an undesirable combustion instability within the engine cylinder resulting in the deterioration of both engine performance and emissions. Proper stratification of mixture and diluents could improve the combustion stability under high diluent environment. EGR stratification within the cylinder was made by adopting a fast-response solenoid valve in the midst of EGR line and controlling its timing and duty. With EGR in both homogeneous mode and stratified mode, in-cylinder pressure and emissions were measured. The thermodynamic heat release analysis showed that the burning duration was decreased in case of stratified EGR. It was found that the stratification of EGR hardly affected the emissions.
Technical Paper

Effect of Design Parameters on the Performance of Finned Exhaust Heat Exchanger

2003-10-27
2003-01-3076
This paper describes the results of a DOE (design of experiment) applied to an exhaust heat exchanger to lower the exhaust gas temperature mainly under high load conditions. The heat exchanger was installed between the exhaust manifold and the inlet of the close-coupled catalytic converter (CCC) to avoid thermal aging. The DOE evaluates the influence of the selected eight design parameters of the heat exchanger geometry on the performance of the exhaust gas cooling system, and the interaction between these parameters. To maximize the heat transfer between exhaust gas and coolant, fins were implemented at the inner surface of the heat exchanger. The design parameters consist of the fin geometry (length, thickness, arrangement, number of fin), coolant direction, exchanger wall thickness, and the length of the heat exchanger. The acceptable range of each design parameter is discussed by analyzing the DOE results.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Fuel/Air Mixture Formation for Heavy Duty Liquid Phase LPG Injection (LPLI) Engines

2003-03-03
2003-01-0636
Submodels are developed for injection, evaporation and wall impingement of a liquid LPG spray. The injection model determines the quality of fuel as two-phase choke flow at the nozzle exit. Wind tunnel experiments show the spray penetration more sensitive to ambient flow velocity than to injection pressure. Most evaporation occurs during choking, while heat transfer from surrounding air has a negligible effect on downstream droplet sizes. Three dimensional simulation shows that the bathtub cavity is better than the dog-dish cavity for stable flame propagation in lean-burn conditions. The injection timing during the IVC period has a negligible effect, while injection during an intake stroke enhances fuel/air mixing to result in more homogeneous cylinder charge.
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