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Standard

Legal Issues Associated with the Use of Probabilistic Design Methods

2002-06-07
CURRENT
AIR5113
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) addresses legal issues concerning use of non-deterministic methods in the design and/or analysis of systems. The investigation includes an assessment of legal precedent for use of these methods both in the aerospace industry and in other non-aerospace engineering contexts. The investigation is primarily, but not exclusively, focused on United States of America Federal and State Law. This document is not intended to be used in any way as a “legal justification” for the use of Probabilistic Methods - it is simply a compilation of experience and past precedent. Many engineers note that the use of Probabilistic Methods for failure risk assessment implies an acceptance that any design will have a finite, albeit small, risk of loss of function, and express concern that this could be seized upon in a Court of Law to indicate that the design was “unsafe”.
Standard

Applications of Probabilistic Methods

2002-02-15
CURRENT
AIR5109
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) addresses the following: 1 Captures previous experience and lessons learned in the application of PM. 2 Tabulates public-domain applications, and several representative examples discussed in detail. 3 Notes relative merits and barriers to implementation. The document does not contain technical details of probabilistic methods, benchmarking of specific approaches or legal aspects. These subjects are covered in other AIRs, referenced in Section 2 and prepared by the Probabilistic Methods Committee of the G-11 Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability and Logistics (RMSL) Division of SAE.
Standard

Perceptions and Limitations Inhibiting the Application of Probabilistic Methods

1998-12-01
CURRENT
AIR5086
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) addresses the following: a Perceptions which inhibit the introduction of probabilistic methods b Technical limitations of probabilistic methods c Recommendations to help promote the use of probabilistic methods The document does not contain technical details of probabilistic methods, applications or benchmarking of specific approaches. These subjects are covered in other AIRs, referenced in Section 2 and prepared by the Probabilistic Methods Committee of the G-11 Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability and Logistics (RMSL) Division of SAE.
Standard

Integration of Probabilistic Methods into the Design Process

1997-01-01
CURRENT
AIR5080
This document discusses a recommended new approach to integrate probabilistic methodologies with design practices, procedures, and software codes currently being used. In addition to complementing design methods currently in use, this new procedure will permit the designer to quantify the amount of conservatism that exists for a particular design due to the large amount of additional information which is provided to the designer. This additional information will allow the designer to make better decisions when faced with tradeoffs between cost, reliability, performance, and weight. Although the methodologies described herein can be used heavily in the design process, their applicability is much more encompassing. They can be used from product concept to customer delivery.
Standard

RELIABILITY AND SAFETY PROCESS INTEGRATION

1996-07-01
CURRENT
AIR5022
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes several of the commonly performed Reliability and Safety (R&S) analysis tasks, with emphasis on their inter-relationships and common data elements. This document also describes how the R&S process can be integrated, reducing duplicate work effort and providing more accurate, comprehensive, and standardized analysis results. To illustrate how this integration can be accomplished, several specific reliability and safety tasks are performed on a subsystem of an example product.
Standard

LIQUID ROCKET ENGINE RELIABILITY CERTIFICATION

1996-04-01
CURRENT
ARP4900
Current design and development practices leading to formal liquid rocket engine qualification (USAF) or certification (NASA) will not achieve the specific reliability objectives of future programs. New rocket engine programs are dictating quantified requirements for high reliability in parallel with a cost-constrained procurement environment. These specified reliability levels cannot be validated with the necessary confidence in a timely or cost-effective manner by present methods. Therefore, a new improved process is needed and has been developed. This new reliability certification methodology will be discussed in detail in the five sections that comprise this document.
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