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Technical Paper

Failure Prediction and Design Optimization of Exhaust Manifold based on CFD and FEM Analysis

2020-04-14
2020-01-1166
A thermo-mechanical fatigue analysis was conducted based on a coupled Finite Element Analysis (FEA) - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method on the crack failure of the exhaust manifold for an inline 4-cylinder turbo-charged diesel engine under the durability test. In the this analysis, the temperature-dependent material properties were obtained from measurements and the model was calibrated with comparison of the predicted exhaust manifold temperatures with the on-engine measurements under the same engine load condition. Temperature and stress/strain distributions in the exhaust manifold were predicted with the calibrated model. Analysis results showed that the cracks took place at locations with high plastic deformations, suggesting that the cause of the failure be thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). Using the equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) as the indicator for thermal mechanical fatigue, three exhaust manifold design revisions were carried out by CAE analysis.
Technical Paper

A Comparative Study on Influence of EIVC and LIVC on Fuel Economy of A TGDI Engine Part I: Friction Torques of Intake Cams with Different Profiles and Lifts

2017-10-08
2017-01-2245
In order to better understand how the Atkinson cycle and the Miller cycle influence the fuel consumption at different engine speeds and loads, an investigation was conducted to compare influences of early intake valve closing (EIVC) and late intake valve closing (LIVC) on the fuel consumption of a 1.5L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engine. The engine was tested with three different intake cams, covering three intake durations: 251 degCA (the base engine), 196 degCA (the Miller engine), and 274 degCA (the Atkinson engine). Compression ratios are 9.5:1 for the base engine and 11.4:1 for the Atkinson and Miller engines, achieved with piston modifications. Results of this investigation will be reported in three papers focusing respectively on characteristics of the engine friction, in-cylinder charge motions for different intake events, and combustion and fuel economy without and with EGR for the naturally aspirated mode and boost mode.
Technical Paper

A Comparative Study on Influence of EIVC and LIVC on Fuel Economy of a TGDI Engine Part II: Influences of Intake Event and Intake Valve Closing Timing on the Cylinder Charge Motion

2017-10-08
2017-01-2246
The present paper is Part II of an investigation on the influences of the late intake valve closing (LIVC) and the early intake valve closing (EIVC) on the engine fuel consumptions at different loads and speeds. The investigation was conducted with two 1.5L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines, one with a low-lift intake cam and the other with a high-lift intake cam. The focus of this paper is the cylinder charge motion. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses were conducted on the characteristics of the cylinder charge motion for the load points 6 bar-bmep / 2000 rpm, 12 bar-bmep / 3000 rpm, and 19 bar-bmep / 1500 rpm, representing naturally aspirated and boost-mode operations without and with scavenging during the valve overlap.
Technical Paper

A Comparative Study on Influence of EIVC and LIVC on Fuel Economy of A TGDI Engine Part III: Experiments on Engine Fuel Consumption, Combustion, and EGR Tolerance

2017-10-08
2017-01-2232
The present paper is Part III of an investigation on the influences of the late intake valve closing (LIVC) and the early intake valve closing (EIVC) on the engine fuel consumptions at different loads and speeds. The investigation was conducted with two 1.5L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines, one with a low-lift intake cam (the Miller engine) and the other with a high-lift intake cam (the Atkinson engine). This paper focuses on the influence of the intake-valve-closing timing on the fuel economy with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). It was found that the Miller engine had a lower friction than the Atkinson engine; however, the impact of the difference in engine frictions on the fuel economy was mainly for low-speed operations. Across the engine speed range, the Miller engine had longer combustion durations than the Atkinson engine as a result of the impact of EIVC on the cylinder charge motion.
Technical Paper

Characteristics of Abnormal Combustion in the Scavenging Zone for a Highly-Boosted Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-1721
In order to improve low speed torques, turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines often employ scavenging with a help of variable valve timing (VVT) controlled by the cam phasers. Scavenging improves the compressor performance at low flows and boosts low-speed-end torques of the engines. Characteristics of the engine combustion in the scavenging zone were studied with a highly-boosted 1.5L TGDI engine experimentally. It was found that the scavenging zone was associated with the highest blowby rates on the engine map. The blowby recirculation was with heavy oil loading, causing considerable hydrocarbon fouling on the intake ports as well as on the stem and the back of the intake valves after the engine was operated in this zone for a certain period of time. The low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) events observed in the engine tests fell mainly in the scavenging zone.
Journal Article

Influence of Crankcase Oil Properties on Low-Speed Pre-Ignition Encountered in a Highly-Boosted Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

2016-10-17
2016-01-2270
This paper reports an experimental investigation on the influence of the crankcase oil properties on the engine combustion in the low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) zone. The investigation was conducted on a highly boosted 1.5L TGDI engine operated at the low-speed-end maximum torque, at which LSPI events were observed most frequently. Six different engine oils were tested, covering SAE 0W-20, 0W-30, 0W-40, 5W-20, 5W-30 and 5W-40. In order to evaluate the evaporative characteristics of the crankcase oil, for each of the selected engine oils, the tests were conducted at two different coolant temperatures, 90°C and 105°C. Because SAE 5W-30 was the base oil for the engine under study, for this particular oil, the investigation was extended to the impact of different levels of the mixture enrichment.
Technical Paper

Influence of Fuel Dilution of Crankcase Oil on Ignitability of Oil Particles in a Highly Boosted Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

2015-09-29
2015-01-2811
The relationship between fuel dilution of the crankcase oil and low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) was studied experimentally with a highly-boosted 1.8L turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engine fueled with RON93 gasoline. It was found that properties of oil particles entered the engine cylinder were affected significantly by fuel dilution. The gasoline content in the oil represents those with long carbon chain or heavy species in gasoline, with much lower boiling points and auto ignition temperatures than those for the undiluted engine oil. Thus, dilution of the engine oil by these gasoline species lowers the volatility and the minimum auto ignition temperature of the engine oil. With 15% fuel content in the oil, the flash point and the fire point of the SAE 5W30 oil dropped from 245 °C to 90 °C and from 265 °C to 150 °C, respectively.
Journal Article

An Experimental Investigation on Low Speed Pre-Ignition in a Highly Boosted Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

2015-04-14
2015-01-0758
The biggest challenge in developing Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection (TGDI) engines may be the abnormal combustion phenomenon occurring at low speeds and high loads, known as low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI). LSPI can trigger severe engine knocks with intensities much greater than those of spark knocks and thus characterized as super knocks. In this study, behavior and patterns of LSPI were investigated experimentally with a highly-boosted 1.5L TGDI engine. It was found that LSPI could occur as an isolated event, a couple of events in sequence, or a trail of events. Although occurring randomly among the engine cylinders, LSPI took place frequently when the engine was operated at low speeds and high loads in the zone where scavenging was employed for boosting engine torques at low speeds, typically < 2500 rpm.
Journal Article

Impact of Fuel Injection on Dilution of Engine Crankcase Oil for Turbocharged Gasoline Direct-Injection Engines

2015-04-14
2015-01-0967
Turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines often have a flat torque curve with the maximum torque covering a wide range of engine speeds. Increasing the high-speed-end torque for a TGDI engine provides better acceleration performance to the vehicle powered by the engine. However, it also requires more fuel deliveries and thus longer injection durations at high engine speeds, for which the multiple fuel injections per cycle may not be possible. In this study, results are reported of an experimental investigation of impact of fuel injection on dilution of the crankcase oil for a highly-boosted TGDI engine. It was found in the tests that the high-speed-end torque for the TGDI engine had a significant influence on fuel dilution: longer injection durations resulted in impingement of large liquid fuel drops on the piston top, leading to a considerable level of fuel dilution.
Technical Paper

Mitigating Intensities of Super Knocks Encountered in Highly Boosted Gasoline Direct Injection Engines

2015-03-30
2015-01-0084
Turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines can achieve a very high level of brake mean effective pressure and thus the engines can be downsized. The biggest challenge in developing highly-boosted TGDI engines may be how to mitigate the pre-ignition (PI) triggered severe engine knocks at high loads and low engine speeds. Since magnitudes of cylinder pressure fluctuations during aforementioned engine knocks reach those for peak firing pressures in normal combustion, they are characterized as super knocks. It is widely believed that the root cause for super knocks is the oil particles entering the engine cylinder, which pre-ignite the cylinder mixture in late of the compression stroke. It is neither possible nor practical to completely eliminate the oil particles from the engine cylinder; a reasonable approach to mitigate super knocks is to weaken the conditions favoring super knocks.
Technical Paper

Reducing Temperature Gradients in High-Power, Large-Capacity Lithium-Ion Cells through Ultra-High Thermal Conductivity Heat Spreaders Embedded in Cooling Plates for Battery Systems with Indirect Liquid Cooling

2013-04-08
2013-01-0234
For lithium-ion battery systems assembled with high-capacity, high-power pouch cells, the cells are commonly cooled with thin aluminum cooling plates in contact with the cells. The cooling plates extract the cell heat and dissipate it to a cooling medium (air or liquid). During the pack utilizations with high-pulse currents, large temperature gradients along the cell surfaces can be encountered as a result of non-uniform distributions of the ohmic heat generated in the cells. The non-uniform cell temperature distributions can be significant for large-size cells. Maximum cell temperatures typically occur near the cell terminal tabs as a result of the ohmic heat of the terminal tabs and connecting busbars and the high local current densities. In this study, a new cooling plate is proposed for improving the uniformity in temperature distributions for the cells with large capacities.
Technical Paper

Characterizing Thermal Behavior of an Air-Cooled Lithium-Ion Battery System for Hybrid Electrical Vehicle Applications Using Finite Element Analysis Approach

2013-04-08
2013-01-1520
Thermal behavior of a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery module under a user-defined cycle corresponding to hybrid electrical vehicle (HEV) applications is analyzed. The module is stacked with 12 high-power 8Ah pouch Li-ion battery cells connected in series electrically. The cells are cooled indirectly with air through aluminum cooling plate sandwiched between each pair of cells. The cooling plate has extended cooling surfaces exposed in the cooling air flow channel. Thermal behavior of the battery system under a user specified electrical-load cycle for the target hybrid vehicle is characterized with the equivalent continuous load profile using a 3D finite element analysis (FEA) model for battery cooling. Analysis results are compared with measurements. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured cell temperatures. Improvement of the cooling system design is also studied with assistance of the battery cooling analyses.
Journal Article

Characterizing Thermal Runaway of Lithium-ion Cells in a Battery System Using Finite Element Analysis Approach

2013-04-08
2013-01-1534
In this study, thermal runaway of a 3-cell Li-ion battery module is analyzed using a 3D finite-element-analysis (FEA) method. The module is stacked with three 70Ah lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) pouch cells and indirectly cooled with a liquid-cooled cold plate. Thermal runaway of the module is assumed to be triggered by the instantaneous increase of the middle cell temperature due to an abusive condition. The self-heating rate for the runaway cell is modeled on the basis of Accelerating Rate Calorimetry (ARC) test data. Thermal runaway of the battery module is simulated with and without cooling from the cold plate; with the latter representing a failed cooling system. Simulation results reveal that a minimum of 165°C for the middle cell is needed to trigger thermal runaway of the 3-cell module for cases with and without cold plate cooling.
Journal Article

Design of Direct and Indirect Liquid Cooling Systems for High- Capacity, High-Power Lithium-Ion Battery Packs

2012-09-24
2012-01-2017
Battery packs for plug-in hybrid electrical vehicle (PHEV) applications can be characterized as high-capacity and high-power packs. For PHEV battery packs, their power and electrical-energy capacities are determined by the range of the electrical-energy-driven operation and the required vehicle drive power. PHEV packs often employ high-power lithium-ion (Li-ion) pouch cells with large cell capacity in order to achieve high packing efficiency. Lithium-ion battery packs for PHEV applications generally have a 96SnP configuration, where S is for cells in series, P is for cells in parallel, and n = 1, 2 or 3. Two PHEV battery packs with 355V nominal voltage and 25-kWh nominal energy capacity are studied. The first pack is assembled with 96 70Ah high-power Li-ion pouch cells in 96S1P configuration. The second pack is assembled with 192 35Ah high-power Li-ion pouch cells in 96S2P configuration.
Technical Paper

A Model-Based Analysis on Size Distribution and Rate of Evaporation for Fuel Drops in a Gasoline Spray in the Engine

2012-04-16
2012-01-1264
Good understanding of fuel sprays in the engine cylinder is crucial to optimizing the operation of direct injection gasoline engines. In this paper, a detailed analysis is conducted on direct gasoline injection sprays from a multi-hole injector. Penetrations and angles of the sprays are characterized with a homogeneous model for the fuel spray. The drop size distributions in the sprays are analyzed using an empirical distribution model. Predicted spray penetrations, spray angles, and drop size distributions under three different injection pressures are compared with the measurements for injection pressures = 40, 100 and 150 bar and good agreements are observed. Transient evaporation rates are also studied for fuel drops in an environment simulating the cylinder condition during the intake stroke of a direct injection gasoline engine.
Technical Paper

Influence of Terminal Tabs/Busbar Ohmic Heat on Maximum Cell Temperature of a Li-ion Battery System for PHEV Applications

2012-04-16
2012-01-0119
The battery packs for plug-in hybrid electrical vehicle (PHEV) applications are relatively small in the charge depleting (CD) mode but fairly large in the charge sustaining (CS) mode for their duties in comparison to the battery packs for hybrid electrical vehicle (HEV) applications. Thus, the heaviest battery thermal load for a PHEV pack is encountered at the end of the CD mode. Because the cells in PHEV battery packs are generally larger than those in the HEV packs in both capacity and size, control of the maximum cell temperature and the maximum differential cell temperature for the cells in a PHEV pack with high packing efficiency is a challenge for the cooling system design. The maximum cell temperatures locate in the areas near the terminal tabs where the current densities are highest.
Journal Article

Thermal Analysis of a High-Power Lithium-Ion Battery System with Indirect Air Cooling

2012-04-16
2012-01-0333
Thermal behavior of a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery module for hybrid electrical vehicle (HEV) applications is analyzed in this study. The module is stacked with 12 high-power pouch Li-ion battery cells. The cells are cooled indirectly with air through aluminum fins sandwiched between each two cells in the module, and each of the cooling fins has an extended cooling surface exposed in the cooling air flow channel. The cell temperatures are analyzed using a quasi-dimensional model under both the transient module load in a user-defined cycle for the battery system utilizations and an equivalent continuous load in the cycle. The cell thermal behavior is evaluated with the volume averaged cell temperature and the cell heat transfer is characterized with resistances for all thermal links in the heat transfer path from the cell to the cooling air. Simulations results are compared with measurements. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured cell temperatures.
Journal Article

Thermal Analysis of a Li-ion Battery System with Indirect Liquid Cooling Using Finite Element Analysis Approach

2012-04-16
2012-01-0331
The performance and life of Li-ion battery packs for electric vehicle (EV), hybrid electrical vehicle (HEV), and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicle (PHEV) applications are influenced significantly by battery operation temperatures. Thermal management of a battery pack is one of the main factors to be considered in the pack design, especially for those with indirect air or indirect liquid cooling since the cooling medium is not in contact with the battery cells. In this paper, thermal behavior of Li-ion pouch cells in a battery system for PHEV applications is studied. The battery system is cooled indirectly with liquid through aluminum cooling fins in contact with each cell and a liquid cooled cold plate for each module in the battery pack. The aluminum cooling fins function as a thermal bridge between the cells and the cold plate. Cell temperature distributions are simulated using a finite element analysis approach under cell utilizations corresponding to PHEV applications.
Journal Article

Thermal Characterization of a Li-ion Battery Module Cooled through Aluminum Heat-Sink Plates

2011-09-13
2011-01-2248
The temperature distribution is studied theoretically in a battery module stacked with 12 high-power Li-ion pouch cells. The module is cooled indirectly with ambient air through aluminum heat-sink plates or cooling plates sandwiched between each pair of cells in the module. Each of the cooling plates has an extended cooling fin exposed in the cooling air channel. The cell temperatures can be controlled by changing the air temperature and/or the heat transfer coefficient on the cooling fin surfaces by regulating the air flow rate. It is found that due to the high thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the cooling plates, heat transfer of the cooling plate governs the cell temperature distribution by spreading the cell heat over the entire cell surface. Influence of thermal from the cooling fins is also simulated.
Journal Article

An Analysis of a Lithium-ion Battery System with Indirect Air Cooling and Warm-Up

2011-09-13
2011-01-2249
Ideal operation temperatures for Li-ion batteries fall in a narrow range from 20°C to 40°C. If the cell operation temperatures are too high, active materials in the cells may become thermally unstable. If the temperatures are too low, the resistance to lithium-ion transport in the cells may become very high, limiting the electrochemical reactions. Good battery thermal management is crucial to both the battery performance and life. Characteristics of various battery thermal management systems are reviewed. Analyses show that the advantages of direct and indirect air cooling systems are their simplicity and capability of cooling the cells in a battery pack at ambient temperatures up to 40°C. However, the disadvantages are their poor control of the cell-to-cell differential temperatures in the pack and their capability to dissipate high cell generations.
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