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Technical Paper

Influence of Freestream Temperature on Ice Accretion Roughness

2019-06-10
2019-01-1993
The influence of freestream static temperature on roughness temporal evolution and spatial variation was investigated in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Glenn Research Center. A 53.34 cm (21-in.) NACA 0012 airfoil model and a 152.4 cm (60-in.) HAARP-II business jet airfoil model were exposed to Appendix C clouds for fixed exposure times and thus fixed ice accumulation parameter. For the base conditions, the static temperature was varied to produce different stagnation point freezing fractions. The resulting ice shapes were then scanned using a ROMER Absolute Arm system and analyzed using the self-organizing map approach of McClain and Kreeger. The ice accretion prediction program LEWICE was further used to aid in interrogations of the ice accretion point clouds by using the predicted surface variations of local collection efficiency.
Technical Paper

The Influence of SLD Drop Size Distributions on Ice Accretion in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

2019-06-10
2019-01-2022
An ice shape database has been created to document ice accretions on a 21-inch chord NACA0012 model and a 72-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model resulting from an exposure to a Supercooled Large Drop (SLD) icing cloud with a bimodal drop size distribution. The ice shapes created were documented with photographs, laser scanned surface measurements over a section of the model span, and measurement of the ice mass over the same section of each accretion. The icing conditions used in the test matrix were based upon previously used conditions on the same models but with an alternate approach to evaluation of drop distribution effects. Ice shapes resulting from the bimodal distribution as well as from equivalent monomodal drop size distributions were obtained and compared.
Technical Paper

Ice Accretion Measurements on an Airfoil and Wedge in Mixed-Phase Conditions

2015-06-15
2015-01-2116
This paper presents measurements of ice accretion shape and surface temperature from ice-crystal icing experiments conducted jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. The data comes from experiments performed at NRC's Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac) in 2012. The measurements are intended to help develop models of the ice-crystal icing phenomenon associated with engine ice-crystal icing. Ice accretion tests were conducted using two different airfoil models (a NACA 0012 and wedge) at different velocities, temperatures, and pressures although only a limited set of permutations were tested. The wedge airfoil had several tests during which its surface was actively cooled. The ice accretion measurements included leading-edge thickness for both airfoils. The wedge and one case from the NACA 0012 model also included 2D cross-section profile shapes.
Technical Paper

Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

2011-06-13
2011-38-0018
Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice-crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations.
Technical Paper

Further Evaluation of Scaling Methods for Rotorcraft Icing

2011-06-13
2011-38-0083
The paper will present experimental results from two recent icing tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The first test, conducted in February 2009, was to evaluate the current recommended scaling methods for fixed wing on representative rotor airfoils at fixed angle of attack. For this test, scaling was based on the modified Ruff method with scale velocity determined by constant Weber number and water film Weber number. Models were un-swept NACA 0012 wing sections. The reference model had a chord of 91.4 cm and scale model had a chord of 35.6 cm. Reference tests were conducted with velocity of 100 kt (52 m/s), droplet medium volume diameter (MVD) 195 μm, and stagnation-point freezing fractions of 0.3 and 0.5 at angle of attack of 5° and 7°. It was shown that good ice shape scaling was achieved with constant Weber number for NACA 0012 airfoils with angle of attack up to 7°.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Icing Scaling on Swept NACA 0012 Airfoil Models

2011-06-13
2011-38-0081
Icing scaling tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel were performed on swept wing models using existing recommended scaling methods that were originally developed for straight wing. Some needed modifications on the stagnation-point local collection efficiency (i.e., Β₀) calculation and the corresponding convective heat transfer coefficient for swept NACA 0012 airfoil models have been studied and reported in 2009, and the correlations will be used in the current study. The reference tests used a 91.4-cm chord, 152.4-cm span, adjustable sweep airfoil model of NACA 0012 profile at velocities of 100 and 150 knots and MVD of 44 and 93 μm. Scale-to-reference model size ratio was 1:2.4. All tests were conducted at 0° angle of attach (AoA) and 45° sweep angle. Ice shape comparison results were presented for stagnation-point freezing fractions in the range of 0.4 to 1.0.
Technical Paper

Parametric Study of Ice Accretion Formation on a Swept Wing at SLD Conditions

2007-09-24
2007-01-3345
An experiment was conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Glenn Research Center to study the effect of sweep angle and temperature on the formation of ice accretions on a NACA 0012 swept wing at SLD conditions. From a baseline Appendix-C condition with a MVD of 20m the drop size was changed to 110 and 200m for the SLD cases. Casting data, ice shape tracings, time-sequence and photographic data were obtained. Time-sequence photography was taken during each run to capture in real time the formation of the ice accretion. Measurements of the critical distance were obtained.
Technical Paper

The Water Film Weber Number in Glaze Icing Scaling

2007-09-24
2007-01-3295
Surface water film dynamics is recognized as playing an important role in the glaze ice accretion process. The solution, in general scaling problems, requires the match of all the relevant non-dimensional parameters to take place individually. However, in water film dynamics similarity, we encounter that is not possible for both Reynolds and Weber numbers to be matched simultaneously, and the strict individual parameter similarity condition has to be relaxed and combination of parameters accepted as a reasonable compromise. In this paper, a film Weber number will be defined and then proposed as a similarity parameter along with the non-dimensional film thickness as well as others that have been long recognized as well established, to form the set of equations that determine the scaled variables in terms of the reference ones.
Technical Paper

Review of Role of Icing Feathers in Ice Accretion Formation

2007-09-24
2007-01-3294
This paper presents a review of our current experimental and theoretical understanding of icing feathers and the role that they play in the formation of ice accretions. It covers the following areas: a short review of past research work related to icing feathers; a discussion of the physical characteristics and terminology used in describing icing feathers; the presence of feathers on ice accretions formed in unswept airfoils, especially at SLD conditions; the role that icing feathers play in the formation of ice accretion shapes on swept wings; the formation of icing feathers from roughness elements; theoretical considerations regarding feather formation, feather interaction to form complex icing structures, the role of film dynamics in the formation of roughness elements and the formation of feathers. Hypotheses related to feather formation and feather growth are discussed.
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