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Technical Paper

Diagnostics of Field-Aged Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) on Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engines

2019-04-02
2019-01-0998
Three-way catalysts have been used in a variety of stoichiometric natural gas engines for emission control. During real-world operation, these catalysts have experienced a large number of temporary and permanent deactivations including thermal aging and chemical contamination. Thermal aging is typically induced either by high engine-out exhaust temperatures or the reaction exotherm generated on the catalysts. Chemical contamination originates from various inorganic species such as Phosphorous (P) and Sulfur (S) that contain in engine fluids, which can poison and/or mask the catalyst active components. Such deactivations are quite difficult to simulate under laboratory conditions, due to the fact that multiple deactivation modes may occur at the same time in the real-world operations. In this work, a set of field-aged TWCs has been analyzed through detailed laboratory research in order to identify and quantify the real-world aging mechanisms.
Technical Paper

Reactor System with Diesel Injection Capability for DOC Evaluations

2018-04-03
2018-01-0647
Plug flow reactors, simulating engine exhaust gas, are widely used in emissions control research to gain insight into the reaction mechanisms and engineering aspects that controls activity, selectivity, and durability of catalyst components. The choice of relevant hydrocarbon (HC) species is one of the most challenging factor in such laboratory studies, given the variety of compositions that can be encountered in different application scenarios. Furthermore, this challenge is amplified by the experimental difficulties related to introducing heavier and multi-component HCs and analyzing the reaction products.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Kinetic Modeling of Degreened and Aged Three-way Catalysts: Aging Impact on Oxygen Storage Capacity and Catalyst Performance

2018-04-03
2018-01-0950
The aging impact on oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and catalyst performance was investigated on one degreened and one aged (hydrothermally aged at 955 °C for 50 h) commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) by experiments and modeling. The difference of OSC between the degreened and aged TWCs was dependent on catalyst temperature. The largest difference was found at 600 °C, at which the amount of OSC decreased by 45.5%. Catalyst performance was evaluated through lightoff tests at two simulated engine exhaust conditions (lean and rich) on a micro-reactor. The aging impact on the catalyst performance was different under lean and rich environments and investigated separately. At the lean condition, oxidation of CO and C3H6 was significantly suppressed while oxidation of C3H8 was relatively less degraded. At the rich condition, the inhibition effect was more pronounced on the aged TWC and inhibiting hydrocarbon species from C3H6 partial oxidation can survive at temperatures up to 450 °C.
Journal Article

Effect of Transition Metal Ion Properties on the Catalytic Functions and Sulfation Behavior of Zeolite-Based SCR Catalysts

2017-03-28
2017-01-0939
Copper- and Iron- based metal-zeolite SCR catalysts are widely used in US and European diesel aftertreatment systems to achieve drastic reduction in NOx emission. These catalysts are highly selective to N2 under wide range of operating conditions. Nevertheless, the type of transition metal has a significant impact on the key performance and durability parameters such as NOx conversion, selectivity towards N2O, hydrothermal stability, and sensitivity to fuel sulfur content. In this study, we explained the differences in the performance characteristics of these catalysts based on their relative acidic-basic nature of transition metal present in these catalysts using practically relevant gas species present in diesel exhaust such as NO2, SOx, and NH3. These experiments show that Fe-zeolite has relatively acidic nature as compared to Cu-zeolite that causes NH3 inhibition and hence explains low NOx conversion on Fe-zeolite at low temperature under standard SCR conditions.
Journal Article

The Impact of Ammonium Nitrate Species on Low Temperature NOx Conversion Over Cu/CHA SCR Catalyst

2017-03-28
2017-01-0953
Cu/CHA catalysts have been widely used in the industry, due to their desirable performance characteristics including the unmatched hydrothermal stability. While broadly recognized for their outstanding activity at or above 200°C, these catalysts may not show desired levels of NOx conversion at lower temperatures. To achieve high NOx conversions it is desirable to have NO2/NOx close to 0.5 for fast SCR. However even under such optimal gas feed conditions, sustained use of Cu/CHA below 200°C leads to ammonium nitrate formation and accumulation, resulting in the inhibition of NOx conversion. In this contribution, the formation and decomposition of NH4NO3 on a commercial Cu/CHA catalyst have been investigated systematically. First, the impact of NH4NO3 self-inhibition on SCR activity as a function of temperature and NO2/NOx ratios was investigated through reactor testing.
Technical Paper

Catalyst Sulfur Poisoning and Recovery Behaviors: Key for Designing Advanced Emission Control Systems

2017-01-10
2017-26-0133
Advanced emission control systems for diesel engines usually include a combination of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), and Ammonia Slip Catalyst (ASC). The performance of these catalysts individually, and of the aftertreatment system overall, is negatively affected by the presence of oxides of sulfur, originating from fuel and lubricant. In this paper, we illustrated some key aspects of sulfur interactions with the most commonly used types of catalysts in advanced aftertreatment systems. In particular, DOC can oxidize SO2 to SO3, collectively referred to as SOx, and store these sulfur containing species. The key functions of a DOC, such as the ability to oxidize NO and HC, are degraded upon SOx poisoning. The impact of sulfur poisoning on the catalytic functions of a DPF is qualitatively similar to DOC.
Journal Article

Impact of Carbonaceous Compounds Present in Real-World Diesel Exhaust on NOx Conversion over Vanadia-SCR Catalyst

2016-04-05
2016-01-0921
Exposure of hydrocarbons (HCs) and particulate matter (PM) under certain real-world operating conditions leads to carbonaceous deposit formation on V-SCR catalysts and causes reversible degradation of its NOx conversion. In addition, uncontrolled oxidation of such carbonaceous deposits can also cause the exotherm that can irreversibly degrade V-SCR catalyst performance. Therefore carbonaceous deposit mitigation strategies, based on their characterization, are needed to minimize their impact on performance. The nature and the amount of the deposits, formed upon exposure to real-world conditions, were primarily carried out by the controlled oxidation of the deposits to classify these carbonaceous deposits into three major classes of species: i) HCs, ii) coke, and iii) soot. The reversible NOx conversion degradation can be largely correlated to coke, a major constituent of the deposit, and to soot which causes face-plugging that leads to decreased catalyst accessibility.
Journal Article

Impact of Accelerated Hydrothermal Aging on Structure and Performance of Cu-SSZ-13 SCR Catalysts

2015-04-14
2015-01-1022
In this contribution, nuanced changes of a commercial Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst with hydrothermal aging, which have not been previously reported, as well as their corresponding impact on SCR functions, are described. In particular, a sample of Cu-SSZ-13 was progressively aged between 550 to 900°C and the changes of performance in NH3 storage, oxidation functionality and NOx conversion of the catalyst were measured after hydrothermal exposure at each temperature. The catalysts thus aged were further characterized by NH3-TPD, XRD and DRIFTS techniques for structural changes. Based on the corresponding performance and structural characteristics, three different regimes of hydrothermal aging were identified, and tentatively as assigned to “mild”, “severe” and “extreme” aging. Progressive hydrothermal aging up to 750°C decreased NOx conversion to a small degree, as well as NH3 storage and oxidation functions.
Technical Paper

SCR Architectures for Low N2O Emissions

2015-04-14
2015-01-1030
The high global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) led to its inclusion in the list of regulated greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutants [1, 2]. The mitigation of N2O on aftertreatment catalysts was shown to be ineffective as its formation and decomposition temperatures do not overlap. Therefore, the root causes for N2O formation were investigated to enable the catalyst architectures and controls development for minimizing its formation. In a typical heavy-duty diesel exhaust aftertreatment system based on selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia derived from urea (SCR), the main contributors to tailpipe N2O are expected to be the undesired reaction between NOx and NH3 over SCR catalyst and NH3 slip in to ammonia slip catalyst (ASC), part of which gets oxidized to N2O.
Technical Paper

Impact of Sulfur-Oxides on the Ammonia Slip Catalyst Performance

2014-04-01
2014-01-1545
The ammonia slip catalyst (ASC), typically composed of Pt oxidation catalyst overlaid with SCR catalyst, is employed for the mitigation of NH3 slip originating from SCR catalysts. Oxidation and SCR functionalities in an ASC can degrade through two key mechanisms i) irreversible degradation due to thermal aging and ii) reversible degradation caused by sulfur-oxides. The impact of thermal aging is well understood and it mainly degrades the SCR function of the ASC and increases the NH3 conversion to undesired products [1]. This paper describes the impact of sulfur-oxides on critical functions of ASC and on NH3 oxidation activity and selectivity towards N2, NOx and N2O. Furthermore impact of desulfation under selected conditions and its extent of ASC performance recovery is explained.
Technical Paper

New Insights into the Unique Operation of Small Pore Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst: Overlapping NH3 Desorption and Oxidation Characteristics for Minimizing Undesired Products

2014-04-01
2014-01-1542
An operational challenge associated with SCR catalysts is the NH3 slip control, particularly for commercial small pore Cu-zeolite formulations as a consequence of their significant ammonia storage capacity. The desorption of NH3 during increasing temperature transients is one example of this challenge. Ammonia slipping from SCR catalyst typically passes through a platinum based ammonia oxidation catalyst (AMOx), leading to the formation of the undesired byproducts NOx and N2O. We have discovered a distinctive characteristic, an overlapping NH3 desorption and oxidation, in a state-of-the-art Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst that can minimize NH3 slip during temperature transients encountered in real-world operation of a vehicle.
Journal Article

Hydrocarbon Storage on Small-Pore Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

2013-04-08
2013-01-0508
In this study we investigated the interaction of short- and long-chain hydrocarbons (HCs), represented by propene (C₃H₆) and n-dodecane (n-C₁₂H₂₆), respectively, with a state-of-the-art small-pore Cu-Zeolite SCR catalyst. By varying HC adsorption conditions, we determined that physisorption was the primary mechanism for some minor HC storage at low temperatures (≺ 200°C), while chemical transformation was involved in more substantial HC storage at higher temperatures (200-400°C). The latter was evidenced by the oxygen-dependent and thermally activated nature of the storage process, and further confirmed by the carbon-rich composition of the deposits. The nature of HC-derived deposits of different origins and amounts was further probed using the standard SCR reaction at kinetically challenging conditions (at 200°C), as well by ammonia adsorption/desorption experiments.
Journal Article

Mitigation of Platinum Poisoning of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalysts

2013-04-08
2013-01-1065
A typical diesel exhaust emission control system for meeting the US EPA 2010 regulations includes one or more platinum-group metal (PGM)-containing catalysts, located upstream of an SCR unit. However, as was previously reported in literature, under certain operating conditions PGM elements can get transferred onto the downstream SCR catalyst, resulting in the loss of its NOx conversion efficiency. In the same studies, the effect of Pt poisoning was found to be mitigated by catalyst treatment at 850°C, presumably due to Pt volatilization and migration. In the present study, we have explored the process of Pt poisoning mitigation, and identified that the recovery can take place at lower temperatures, reducing the risk of hydrothermal damage to the catalyst.
Journal Article

N2O Formation and Mitigation in Diesel Aftertreatment Systems

2012-04-16
2012-01-1085
The high global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N₂O) led to its recent inclusion in the list of regulated pollutants under the emerging greenhouse gas regulations. While N₂O can be present in small quantities among the combustion products, it can also be generated as a minor byproduct in various types of aftertreatment systems. In this work, a systematic review of sources of N₂O is presented, along with the potential mechanisms of formation in a typical selective-catalytic-reduction-based diesel exhaust aftertreatment system. It is demonstrated that diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and ammonia slip catalyst (ASC) can all potentially contribute to N₂O formation, depending on the catalyst material and exhaust gas conditions, as well as aftertreatment operation strategies. Furthermore, catalysts used in SCR aftertreatment system are also shown to decompose and/or reduce N₂O to N₂ under select conditions.
Journal Article

Axially Resolved Performance of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalysts

2012-04-16
2012-01-1084
In this work, an alternative method is proposed and validated for quantifying the axial performance of a state-of-the-art Cu zeolite SCR catalyst. Catalyst cores of a standard length, with varying lengths of wash-coated regions were used to axially resolve the functional performance of the SCR catalyst. This proposed method was validated by quantifying the catalyst entrance and exit effects, as well as the effect of non-uniform wash-coat loading densities. This method is less susceptible to some of the complications highlighted in the previous studies, such as flow uniformity between channels, as well as radiative heating effects, since the product gases are sampled across the entire monolith cross-section rather than through a single catalyst channel. The specific catalyst functions quantified include: NO and NH₃ oxidation, NH₃ storage capacity, as well as NOx conversion efficiency.
Technical Paper

Hydrocarbon Poisoning of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalysts

2012-04-16
2012-01-1096
The effects of propylene (C₃H₆) and dodecane (n-C₁₂H₂₆) exposure on the NH₃-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) performance of two Cu-exchanged zeolite catalysts were investigated. The first sample was a model Cu/beta zeolite sample and the second a state-of-the-art Cu/zeolite sample, with the zeolite material characterized by relatively small pores. Overall, the state-of-the-art sample performed better than the model sample, in terms of hydrocarbon inhibition (which was reduced) and N₂O formation (less formed). The state-of-the-art sample was completely unaffected by dodecane at temperatures lower than 300°C, and only slightly inhibited (less than 5% conversion loss), for standard SCR, by C₃H₆. There was no evidence of coke formation on this catalyst with C₃H₆ exposure. The model sample was more significantly affected by hydrocarbon exposure. With C₃H₆, inhibition is associated with its partial oxidation intermediates adsorbed on the catalyst surface.
Journal Article

New Insights into Reaction Mechanism of Selective Catalytic Ammonia Oxidation Technology for Diesel Aftertreatment Applications

2011-04-12
2011-01-1314
Mitigation of ammonia slip from SCR system is critical to meeting the evolving NH₃ emission standards, while achieving maximum NOx conversion efficiency. Ammonia slip catalysts (ASC) are expected to balance high activity, required to oxidize ammonia across a broad range of operating conditions, with high selectivity of converting NH₃ to N₂, thus avoiding such undesirable byproducts as NOx or N₂O. In this work, new insights into the behavior of an advanced ammonia slip catalyst have been developed by using accelerated progressive catalyst aging as a tool for catalyst property interrogation. The overall behavior was deconstructed to several underlying functions, and referenced to an active but non-selective NH₃ oxidation function of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and to the highly selective but minimally active NH₃ oxidation function of an SCR catalyst.
Journal Article

Why Cu- and Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Behave Differently At Low Temperatures

2010-04-12
2010-01-1182
Cu- and Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts emerged in recent years as the primary candidates for meeting the increasingly stringent lean exhaust emission regulations, due to their outstanding activity and durability characteristics. It is commonly known that Cu-zeolite catalysts possess superior activity to Fe-zeolites, in particular at low temperatures and sub-optimal NO₂/NOx ratios. In this work, we elucidate some underlying mechanistic differences between these two classes of catalysts, first based on their NO oxidation abilities, and then based on the relative properties of the two types of exchanged metal sites. Finally, by using the ammonia coverage-dependent NOx performance, we illustrate that state-of-the-art Fe-zeolites can perform better under certain transient conditions than in steady-state.
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