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Technical Paper

Ignition Delay Model of Multiple Injections in CI Engines

2019-09-09
2019-24-0071
In compression ignition engines, the combustion starts after the ignition delay period from the start of injection. The degree of mixing between air and fuel during this period impacts combustion characteristics, such as the pressure rise rate, which worsens combustion noise. The formation of soot and nitrogen oxides can also be affected. In addition, ignition delay is essential to estimate the in-cylinder pressure. Therefore, there have been many researches performed to estimate the ignition delay for model-based control applications considering the above relations. In this study, a semiempirical and 0-dimensional ignition delay model is developed for real-time control applications. As the ignition delay consists of physical and chemical delays in compression ignition engines, the integrated ignition delay model considers both of these variables.
Technical Paper

A Study of Flow Characteristics on the Diesel-Gasoline Dual-Fuel Combustion by 3-D CFD

2019-09-09
2019-24-0117
Various advanced combustion concepts, which can achieve higher thermal efficiency and emissions reduction, have been suggested as the emissions regulation gets stricter. Dual-fuel combustion that operates by using different fuels having both premixed and non-premixed combustion characteristics is one of the viable alternatives. In dual-fuel combustion, it is critical to understand air-fuel mixture distribution as it determines the ignition spot and following combustion phase. The fuel distribution in the engine is affected by various factors, such as chamber geometry, injection strategy or in-cylinder flow motion. Furthermore, among them, in-cylinder motion, usually described in terms of swirl or tumble motion, is mostly affected by in-cylinder port geometry. In this paper, 3-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to investigate the effect of in-cylinder flow motion in dual-fuel combustion. Two head and port geometries were used in the simulations.
Technical Paper

New Index for Diagnosis of Abnormal Combustion Using a Crankshaft Position Sensor in a Diesel Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0720
Most research of internal combustion engine focuses on improving the fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions to satisfy regulations and marketability. Engine combustion is a key factor in determining engine performance. Generally, engine operating parameters are optimized for the best performance and less exhaust emissions. However, abnormal combustion results in engine conditions that are far from an optimized operation. Abnormal combustion, including a misfire, can happen for a variety of reasons, such as superannuated vehicles, extreme changes in the driving environment, etc. Abnormal combustion causes serious deterioration of not only noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), but also the fuel economy and exhaust emission. NVH stands for unwanted noise, vibration and harshness from the vehicle. The misfiring especially deteriorates vehicle comfortability. Abnormal combustion at one cylinder breaks the exciting force balance between cylinders and causes unexpected vibration.
Technical Paper

Numerical Analysis on the Effect of Piston Bowl Geometry in Gasoline-Diesel Dual-Fuel Combustion

2019-04-02
2019-01-1164
As emissions regulations become stricter, a variety of advanced combustion concepts that can reduce emissions with a higher thermal efficiency have been suggested. Dual-fuel combustion is one of the alternatives that has both premixed and non-premixed combustion characteristics. Knowing the effects of the mixture formation in dual-fuel combustion is important because it determines the ignition location and the following combustion phase. Hence, a thorough investigation on the related factors, such as the engine hardware or fuel spray, is required. Meanwhile, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a good technique to visualize the in-cylinder phenomena and enables quantitative investigations into the detailed combustion characteristics. In this paper, a 3-dimensional CFD simulation was used to investigate the effects of the mixture formation in dual-fuel combustion. The combustion model consists of two parts.
Technical Paper

Prediction of In-Cylinder Pressure for Light-Duty Diesel Engines

2019-04-02
2019-01-0943
In recent years, emission regulations have been getting increasingly strict. In the development of engines that comply with these regulations, in-cylinder pressure plays a fundamental role, as it is necessary to analyze combustion characteristics and control combustion-related parameters. The analysis of in-cylinder pressure data enables the modelling of exhaust emissions in which characteristic temperature can be derived from the in-cylinder pressure, and the pressure can be used for other investigations, such as optimizing efficiency and emissions through controlling combustion. Therefore, a piezoelectric pressure sensor to measure in-cylinder pressure is an essential element in the engine research field. However, it is difficult to practice the installation of this pressure sensor on all engines and on-road vehicles owing to cost issues.
Technical Paper

Impact of Grid Density on the LES Analysis of Flow CCV: Application to the TCC-III Engine under Motored Conditions

2018-04-03
2018-01-0203
Large-eddy simulation (LES) applications for internal combustion engine (ICE) flows are constantly growing due to the increase of computing resources and the availability of suitable CFD codes, methods and practices. The LES superior capability for modeling spatial and temporal evolution of turbulent flow structures with reference to RANS makes it a promising tool for describing, and possibly motivating, ICE cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) and cycle-resolved events such as knock and misfire. Despite the growing interest towards LES in the academic community, applications to ICE flows are still limited. One of the reasons for such discrepancy is the uncertainty in the estimation of the LES computational cost. This in turn is mainly dependent on grid density, the CFD domain extent, the time step size and the overall number of cycles to be run. Grid density is directly linked to the possibility of reducing modeling assumptions for sub-grid scales.
Journal Article

An Experimental Study on the Effect of Stroke-to-Bore Ratio of Atkinson DISI Engines with Variable Valve Timing

2018-04-03
2018-01-1419
In this study, fundamental questions in improving thermal efficiency of spark-ignition engine were revisited, regarding two principal factors, that is, stroke-to-bore (S/B) ratio and valve timings. In our experiment, late intake valve closing (LIVC) camshaft and variable valve timing (VVT) module for valve timing control were equipped in the single-cylinder, direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) engine with three different S/B ratios (1.00, 1.20, and 1.47). In these three setups, displacement volume and compression ratio (CR) were fixed. In addition, the tumble ratio for cylinder head was also kept the same to minimize the flow effect on the flame propagation caused by cylinder head while focusing on the sole effect of changing the S/B ratio.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Sub-Grid Model Effect on the Accuracy of In-Cylinder LES of the TCC Engine under Motored Conditions

2017-09-04
2017-24-0040
The increasing interest in the application of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to Internal Combustion Engines (hereafter ICEs) flows is motivated by its capability to capture spatial and temporal evolution of turbulent flow structures. Furthermore, LES is universally recognized as capable of simulating highly unsteady and random phenomena driving cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) and cycle-resolved events such as knock and misfire. Several quality criteria were proposed in the recent past to estimate LES uncertainty: however, definitive conclusions on LES quality criteria for ICEs are still far to be found. This paper describes the application of LES quality criteria to the TCC-III single-cylinder optical engine from University of Michigan and GM Global R&D; the analyses are carried out under motored condition.
Technical Paper

Study of LES Quality Criteria in a Motored Internal Combustion Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0549
In recent years, Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is spotlighted as an engineering tool and severe research efforts are carried out on its applicability to Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). However, there is a general lack of definitive conclusions on LES quality criteria for ICE. This paper focuses on the application of LES quality criteria to ICE and to their correlation, in order to draw a solid background on future LES quality assessments for ICE. In this paper, TCC-III single-cylinder optical engine from University of Michigan is investigated and the analysis is conducted under motored condition. LES quality is mainly affected by grid size and type, sub-grid scale (SGS) model, numeric schemes. In this study, the same grid size and type are used in order to focus on the effect on LES quality of SGS models and blending factors of numeric scheme only.
Technical Paper

A Study on the Refinement of Turbulence Intensity Prediction for the Estimation of In-Cylinder Pressure in a Spark-Ignited Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0525
The role of 1D simulation tool is growing as the engine system is becoming more complex with the adoption of a variety of new technologies. For the reliability of the 1D simulation results, it is necessary to improve the accuracy and applicability of the combustion model implemented in the 1D simulation tool. Since the combustion process in SI engine is mainly determined by the turbulence, many models have been concentrating on the prediction of the evolution of in-cylinder turbulence intensity. In this study, two turbulence models which can resemble the turbulence intensity close to that of 3D CFD tool were utilized. The first model is dedicated to predicting the evolution of turbulence intensity during intake and compression strokes so that the turbulence intensity at the spark timing can be estimated properly. The second model is responsible for predicting the turbulence intensity of burned and unburned zone during the combustion process.
Technical Paper

Closed-Loop Control Method for Monitoring and Improving the Diesel Combustion Noise

2016-06-15
2016-01-1770
This paper presents two closed-loop control methods for monitoring and improving the combustion behavior and the combustion noise on two 4-cylinder diesel engines, in which an in-cylinder pressure and an accelerometer transducer are used to monitor and control them. Combustion processes are developed to satisfy the stricter and stricter regulations on emissions and fuel consumption. These combustion processes are influenced by the factors such as engine durability, driving conditions, environmental influences and fuel properties. Combustion noise could be increased by these factors and is detrimental to interior sound quality. Therefore, it is necessary to develop robust combustion behaviors and combustion noise. For this situation, we have developed two closed-loop control methods. Firstly, a method using in-cylinder pressure data was developed for monitoring and improving the combustion noise of a 1.7L engine. A new index using the values calculated from the data was proposed.
Technical Paper

Virtual NOx sensor for Transient Operation in Light-Duty Diesel Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0561
Currently, diesel engine-out exhaust NOx emission level prediction is a major challenge for complying with the stricter emission legislation and for control purpose of the after-treatment system. Most of the NOx prediction research is based on the Zeldovich thermal mechanism, which is reasonable from the physical point of view and for its simplicity. Nevertheless, there are some predictable range limitations, such as low temperature with high EGR rate operating conditions or high temperature with low EGR rates. In the present paper, 3 additional considerations, pilot burned gas mixing before the main injection; major NO formation area; concentration correction, were applied to the previously developed real-time NO estimation model based on in-cylinder pressure and data available from ECU. The model improvement was verified on a 1.6 liter EURO5 diesel engine in both steady and transient operation.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Soot Emission in Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition Engines Using a Detailed Soot Model Framework

2016-04-05
2016-01-0580
The soot emission in direct-injection spark-ignition engines under various operating conditions was numerically investigated in the present study. A detailed soot model was used to resolve the physical soot process that consists of polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbon (PAH) formation and soot particle dynamics. The primary propagating flame in partially-premixed field was described by G-equation model, and the concentrations of burned species as well as PAH behind of the flame front were determined from the laminar flamelet library that incorporates the PAH chemical mechanism. The particle dynamics in post-flame region include nucleation, surface growth, coagulation, and oxidation were modeled by method of moments. To improve the model predictability, a gasoline surrogate model was proposed to match the real fuel properties, and the input of droplet size distribution of fuel spray was obtained from Phase-Doppler Particle Analyzer.
Technical Paper

Study on the Effect of Injection Strategies on Particulate Emission Characteristics under Cold Start Using In-cylinder Visualization

2016-04-05
2016-01-0822
Due to the direct injection of fuel into a combustion chamber, particulate emission is a challenge in DISI engines. Specifically, a significant amount of particulate emission is produced under the cold start condition. In this research, the main interest was to investigate particulate emission characteristics under the catalyst heating condition because it is one of the significant particulate-emissionproducing stages under the cold start condition. A single-cylinder optically accessible engine was used to investigate the effect of injection strategies on particulate emission characteristics under the catalyst heating condition. The split injection strategy was applied during intake stroke with various injection pressures and injection timings. Using luminosity analysis of the soot radiation during combustion, the particulate formation characteristics of each injection strategy were studied. Moreover, the factors that affect PM formation were analyzed via fuel injection visualization.
Technical Paper

Development of a Vehicle System Model for the First Medium- and Heavy-Duty Commercial Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Standards in Korea

2015-09-29
2015-01-2774
To properly respond to demands to reduce national energy consumption and meet greenhouse gas emission targets based on environment policy, the Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy of Korea formed a research consortium consisting of government agencies and academic and research institutions to establish the first fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty (MHD) commercial vehicles. The standards are expected to be introduced in 2017 as Phase 1 of the plan and will regulate trucks with a gross vehicle weight in excess of 3.5 tons and buses with a carrying capacity of more than 16 persons. Most MHD commercial vehicles are custom-made and manufactured in diversified small-quantity batch production systems for commercial or public use, resulting in difficulties in utilizing mandatory vehicle tests for fuel efficiency evaluations.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study on the Multiple Injection Strategy in Diesel Engines using a Modified 2-D Flamelet Model

2015-09-06
2015-24-2406
The flamelet model is a widely used combustion model that demonstrates a good prediction of non-premixed combustion. In this model, the chemical time scales are considered to be smaller compared to those of the turbulence, which allows the heat and mass transfer equation to be decoupled from the flow equation. However, the model's dependency on the mixture fraction limits the combustion analysis to a single injection. To overcome this limitation, a two dimensional flamelet model, which uses two mixture fraction variables, was introduced to represent the non-premixed combustion of multiple injections. However, the model's computational time drastically increased due to the expansion of the solution domain. Thus, a modified 2-D flamelet model was introduced to reduce the computational time of the two dimensional flamelet model.
Technical Paper

Characteristics of Diesel Engine Noise According to EGR Rate Change during Transient Operation

2015-06-15
2015-01-2296
Diesel engine noise is classified into mechanical noise, flow dynamic noise and combustion noise. Among these, combustion noise level is higher than the others due to the high compression ratio of diesel combustion and auto ignition. The injected fuel is mixed with air in the ignition delay process, followed by simultaneous ignition of the premixed mixture. This process results in a rapid pressure rise, which is the main source of combustion noise. The amount of fuel burned during premixed combustion is mainly affected by the ignition delay. The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate has an impact on ignition delay, and thus, it influences the combustion noise characteristics. Therefore, during the transient state, the combustion noise characteristics change as the EGR rate deviates from the target value. In this study, the effect of the EGR rate deviation during the transient state of the combustion noise is examined. A 1.6 liter diesel engine with a VGT was used for the experiment.
Technical Paper

Closed-Loop Control for Diesel Combustion Noise Using Engine Vibration Signals

2015-06-15
2015-01-2297
The combustion noise of a diesel engine can be deteriorated by combustion characteristics such as the maximum rate of heat release and the start of combustion. These combustion characteristics in turn are influenced by the factors such as the engine NVH durability, driving conditions, environmental factors and fuel properties. Therefore, we need to develop the robust combustion noise that is insensitive to these factors. To achieve this aim, methods for predicting combustion characteristics has been developed by analyzing the vibration signal measured from the engine cylinder block. The closed-loop control of injection parameters through combustion characteristics prediction has been performed to produce the desired engine combustion performance. We constructed an ECU logic for the closed-loop control and verified the design in a diesel passenger car. We also evaluated the effect of combustion noise and fuel consumption by applying the closed-loop control.
Technical Paper

Study on the Correlation between the Heat Release Rate and Vibrations from a Diesel Engine Block

2015-04-14
2015-01-1673
In this study, a correlation between the maximum heat release rate and vibrations from a diesel engine block was derived, and a methodology to determine the maximum heat release rate is presented. To investigate and analyze the correlation, an engine test and an actual road vehicle test were performed using a 1.6-L diesel engine. By varying the engine speed, load and main injection timing, the vibration signals from the engine block were measured and analyzed using a continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The results show that the maximum heat release rate has a strong correlation with the magnitude of the vibrations. A specific bandwidth, the vibration signals between 0.3∼1.5 kHz, was affected by the variation in the heat release rate. The vibrations excited by combustion lasted over 50 CAD; however, the signals during the period of 35 CAD after the start of injection had a dominant effect on the maximum heat release rate.
Technical Paper

An Investigation into the Operating Strategy for the Dual-Fuel PCCI Combustion with Propane and Diesel under a High EGR Rate Condition

2015-04-14
2015-01-0854
In this work, the operating strategy for diesel injection methods and a way to control the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate under dual-fuel PCCI combustion with an appropriate ratio of low-reactivity fuel (propane) to achieve high combustion stability and low emissions is introduced. The standards of combustion stability were carbon monoxide (CO) emissions below 5,000 ppm and a CoV of the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) below 5 %. Additionally, the NOx emissions was controlled to not exceed 50 ppm, which is the standard of conventional diesel combustion, and PM emissions was kept below 0.2 FSN, which is a tenth of the conventional diesel value without a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The operating condition was a low speed and load condition (1,500 rpm/ near gIMEP of 0.55 MPa).
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