Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
Technical Paper

Role of Late Soot Oxidation for Low Emission Combustion in a Diffusion-controlled, High-EGR, Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

2009-11-02
2009-01-2813
Soot formation and oxidation are complex and competing processes during diesel combustion. The balance between the two processes and their history determines engine-out soot values. Besides the efforts to lower soot formation with measures to influence the flame lift-off distance for example or to use HCCI-combustion, enhancement of late soot oxidation is of equal importance for low-λ diffusion-controlled low emissions combustion with EGR. The purpose of this study is to investigate soot oxidation in a heavy duty diesel engine by statistical analysis of engine data and in-cylinder endoscopic high speed photography together with CFD simulations with a main focus on large scale in-cylinder gas motion. Results from CFD simulations using a detailed soot model were used to reveal details about the soot oxidation.
Technical Paper

Ion Current Sensing for HCCI Combustion Feedback

2003-10-27
2003-01-3216
Measurement of ion current signal from HCCI combustion was performed. The aim of the work was to investigate if a measurable ion current signal exists and if it is possible to obtain useful information about the combustion process. Furthermore, influence of mixture quality in terms of air/fuel ratio and EGR on the ion current signal was studied. A conventional spark plug was used as ionization sensor. A DC voltage (85 Volt) was applied across the electrode gap. By measuring the current through the gap the state of the gas can be probed. A comparison between measured pressure and ion current signal was performed, and dynamic models were estimated by using system identification methods. The study shows that an ion current signal can be obtained from HCCI combustion and that the signal level is very sensitive to the fuel/air equivalence ratio.
Technical Paper

Supercharged Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) with Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Pilot Fuel

2000-06-19
2000-01-1835
In an attempt to extend the upper load limit for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), supercharging in combination with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) have been applied. Two different boost pressures were used, 1.1 bar and 1.5 bar. High EGR rates were used in order to reduce the combustion rate. The highest obtained IMEP was 16 bar. This was achieved with the higher boost pressure, at close to stoichiometric conditions and with approximately 50 % EGR. Natural gas was used as the main fuel. In the case with the higher boost pressure, iso-octane was used as pilot fuel, to improve the ignition properties of the mixture. This made it possible to use a lower compression ratio and thereby reducing the maximum cylinder pressure. The tests were performed on a single cylinder engine operated at low speed (1000 rpm). The test engine was equipped with a modified cylinder head, having a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) mechanism.
Technical Paper

Influence of Mixture Quality on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition

1998-10-19
982454
The major advantages with Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, HCCI, is high efficiency in combination with low NOx-emissions. The major drawback with HCCI is the problem to control the ignition timing over a wide load and speed range. Other drawbacks are the limitation in attainable IMEP and relativly high emissions of unburned hydrocarbons. But the use of Exhaust Gas Recycling (EGR) instead of only air, slows down the rate of combustion and makes it possible to use lower air/fuel ratio, which increases the attainable upper load limit. The influence of mixture quality was therefore experimentally investigated. The effects of different EGR rates, air/fuel ratios and inlet mixture temperatures were studied. The compression ratio was set to 18:1. The fuels used were iso-octane, ethanol and commercially available natural gas. The engine was operated naturally aspirated mode for all tests.
X