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Technical Paper

Soot and PAH Formation Characteristics of Methanol-Gasoline Belnds in Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames

2018-04-03
2018-01-0357
Particulate matter emissions are becoming a big issue for GDI engines as the emission regulations being more stringent. Methanol has been considered to be an important alternative fuel to reduce soot emissions. To understand the effect of methanol addition on soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) formation, the 2-D distributions of soot volume fraction and different size PAHs relative concentrations in methanol/gasoline laminar diffusion flames were measured by TC-LII and PLIF techniques. The effect of methanol was investigated under the conditions of the same carbon flow and the same flame height. The methanol volume fraction was set as M0/20/40/60/80. The results showed that the natural luminescent flame lift-off height and soot lift-off height increases consistently with the increasing methanol content due to the increase of outlet velocity of fuel vapor.
Technical Paper

Regulated and Unregulated Emissions from a Spark Ignition Engine Fueled with Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE)-Gasoline Blends

2017-10-08
2017-01-2328
Bio-butanol has been widely investigated as a promising alternative fuel. However, the main issues preventing the industrial-scale production of butanol is its relatively low production efficiency and high cost of production. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE), the intermediate product in the ABE fermentation process for producing bio-butanol, has attracted a lot of interest as an alternative fuel because it not only preserves the advantages of oxygenated fuels, but also lowers the cost of fuel recovery for individual component during fermentation. If ABE could be directly used for clean combustion, the separation costs would be eliminated which save an enormous amount of time and money in the production chain of bio-butanol.
Journal Article

HC Traps for Gasoline and Ethanol Applications

2013-04-08
2013-01-1297
In-line hydrocarbon (HC) traps are not widely used to reduce HC emissions due to their limited durability, high platinum group metal (PGM) concentrations, complicated processing, and insufficient hydrocarbon (HC) retention temperatures required for efficient conversion by the three-way catalyst component. New trapping materials and system architectures were developed utilizing an engine dynamometer test equipped with dual Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometers for tracking the adsorption and desorption of various HC species during the light-off period. Parallel laboratory reactor studies were conducted which show that the new HC trap formulations extend the traditional adsorption processes (i.e., based on physic-sorption and/or adsorption at acid sites) to chemical reaction mechanisms resulting in oligomerized, dehydro-cyclization, and partial coke formation.
Technical Paper

Surrogate Diesel Fuel Models for Low Temperature Combustion

2013-04-08
2013-01-1092
Diesel fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbons. Since modeling their combustion characteristics with the inclusion of all hydrocarbon species is not feasible, a hybrid surrogate model approach is used in the present work to represent the physical and chemical properties of three different diesel fuels by using up to 13 and 4 separate hydrocarbon species, respectively. The surrogates are arrived at by matching their distillation profiles and important properties with the real fuel, while the chemistry surrogates are arrived at by using a Group Chemistry Representation (GCR) method wherein the hydrocarbon species in the physical property surrogates are grouped based on their chemical classes, and the chemistry of each class is represented by using up to two hydrocarbon species.
Technical Paper

A Visualization Test Setup for Investigation of Water-Deposit Interaction in a Surrogate Rectangular Cooler Exposed to Diesel Exhaust Flow

2012-04-16
2012-01-0364
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers are commonly used in diesel engines to reduce the temperature of recirculated exhaust gases in order to reduce NOx emissions. The presence of a cool surface in the hot exhaust causes particulate soot deposition as well as hydrocarbon and water condensation. Fouling experienced through deposition of particulate matter and hydrocarbons results in degraded cooler effectiveness and increased pressure drop. In this study, a visualization test setup is designed and constructed so that the effect of water condensation on the deposit formation and growth at various coolant temperatures can be studied. A water-cooled surrogate rectangular channel is employed to represent the EGR cooler. One side of the channel is made of glass for visualization purposes. A medium duty diesel engine is used to generate the exhaust stream.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation on Removing PM and NOX Simultaneously from Diesel Exhaust

2008-06-23
2008-01-1793
In order to achieve simultaneous removal of particulate matters (PM) and NOX in diesel exhaust, a new kind of aftertreatment prototype has been developed. The prototype combined effects of static, cyclone, non-thermal plasma and hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction. Experiments have been carried out with standard gases simulating diesel exhaust. Physical and chemical effects that took place in the prototype are as follows: the collection of PM by electrostatic-cyclone system, the oxidative combustion of PM, the selective catalytic reduction of NOX, and the reaction between PM and NOX. The effect of non-thermal plasma makes the density of NO decrease and that of NO2 increase, whereas, the amount of NOX remains the same. Employing catalyst coupled with non-thermal plasma debase the temperature by about 50◻, there the peak value of transform rate appears.
Technical Paper

An Electrohydraulic Gas Sampling Valve with Application to Hydrocarbon Emissions Studies

1980-02-01
800045
Design and development of an electrohydraulically actuated gas sampling valve is presented for use in auto engine combustion studies. The valve was developed with particular emphasis on sampling within the vicinity of the wall quench layer, requiring minimum leakage rates to avoid sample contamination and flush seating of the valve-stem to valve-seat to avoid perturbations of the wall layer. Response in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 milliseconds is attainable for variable valve lifts measured between 0.01 to 0.30 mm while using a net sealing force of approximately 750N. Gas leakage rates ranged from 0.05% to 1% of the sample mass flow rate when sampling from estimated distances from the wall of 0.3 mm to 0.03 mm, respectively, at a cylinder pressure of 10 bar. The gas sampling valve is presently coupled to a gas chromatograph to measure concentrations of major species components.
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