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Standard

Perspectives on Integrating Structural Health Monitoring Systems into Fixed-Wing Military Aircraft

2019-09-18
CURRENT
AIR6245
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is prepared for stakeholders seeking information about the evolution, integration, and approval of SHM technologies for military aircraft systems. The report provides this information in the form of (a) two military organizations’ perspectives on requirements, and (b) general SHM challenges and industry perspectives. The report only provides information to generate awareness of perspectives for military aircraft and, hence, assists those who are involved in developing SHM systems understanding the broad range of regulations, requirements, and standards published by military organizations that are available in the public domain from the military organizations.
Standard

S400 Copper Media Interface Characteristics Over Extended Distances

2019-07-09
CURRENT
AS5643/1A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes guidelines for the use of IEEE-1394-2008 Beta (formerly IEEE-1394b) as a data bus network in military and aerospace vehicles. It encompasses the data bus cable and its interface electronics for a system utilizing S400 over copper medium over extended lengths. This document contains extensions/restrictions to “off-the-shelf” IEEE-1394 standards, and assumes that the reader already has a working knowledge of IEEE-1394. This document does not identify specific environmental requirements (electromagnetic compatibility, temperature, vibration, etc.); such requirements will be vehicle-specific and even LRU-specific. However, the hardware requirements and examples contained herein do address many of the environmental conditions that military and aerospace vehicles may experience. One should refer to the appropriate sections of MIL-STD-461E for their particular LRU, and utilize handbooks such as MIL-HDBK-454A and MIL-HDBK-5400 for guidance.
Book

Counterfeit Parts and Their Impact on the Supply Chain, Second Edition

2018-11-15
Why should the supply chain be concerned if their buyers or subcontractors are purchasing counterfeit electronic parts or if their products contain counterfeit electronic parts? If these parts end up in items that are safety critical and security-risk sensitive such as aviation, space, and defense products, whole secure systems can be comprised. As organizations have become aware of counterfeit parts, one of their responses may be to test upon acceptance or prior to receipt. But testing alone may not detect all counterfeits. Possible sources of counterfeits include products that did not meet quality control requirements and were not destroyed, overruns sold into the market place, unauthorized production shifts, theft, and e-waste. The counterfeited electronic part ends up in the supply chain when ordered by an unsuspecting buyer, who does not confirm the originating source of the part.
Magazine

Tech Briefs: September 2018

2018-09-01
Enhanced SATCOMs for Unmanned Aerial Systems The Bus Too Tough to Die Combating Infrared Threats on the Battlefield Optical Interconnect Design Challenges in Space High-Performance Computing for the Next-Generation Combat Vehicle Merging Antenna and Electronics Boosts Energy and Spectrum Efficiency Integrated Magneto-Optical Devices for On-Chip Photonic Systems Development of magneto-optical (MO) materials could lead to a range of nonreciprocal optical devices for emerging standardized photonic integrated circuit (PIC) fabrication processes. Low Power Optical Phase Array Using Graphene on Silicon Photonics Electrostatic doping of 2D materials embedded in waveguides could enable ultrafast devices with unprecedented power. Spatial Resolution and Contrast of a Focused Diffractive Plenoptic Camera New technology captures spectral and spatial information of a scene in one snapshot while raising pixel counts and improving image quality.
Magazine

Tech Briefs: June 2018

2018-06-01
Beyond VMEbus - A New Concept Taming the Thermal Behavior of Solid-State Military Lasers Solving the Challenge of Thermal Design in Aerospace Electronics Improving Component Life in Abrasive, Corrosive Aerospace Environments New Pulse Analysis Techniques for Radar and EW Validation of Ubiquitous 2D Radar Converting Existing Copper Wire Firing System to a Fiber-Optically Controlled Firing System for Electromagnetic Pulsed Power Experiments Technological improvements make pulsed-power experiments with gunpowder- or air-driven guns safer. Low-Cost Ground Sensor Network for Intrusion Detection COTS-based system could provide increased level of security with less manpower. In-Network Processing on Low-Cost IoT Nodes for Maritime Surveillance Commercially available system of distributed wireless sensors could increase the Navy's intelligence collection footprint.
Technical Paper

Computing Remaining Fatigue Life Under Incrementally Updated Loading Histories

2018-04-03
2018-01-0623
After manufacture, every military vehicle experiences a unique history of dynamic loads, depending on loads carried, missions completed, etc. Damage accumulates in vehicle structures and components accordingly, leading eventually to failures that can be difficult to anticipate, and to unpredictable consequences for mission objectives. The advent of simulation-based fatigue life prediction tools opens a path to Digital Twin based solutions for tracking damage, and for gaining control over vehicle reliability. An incremental damage updating feature has now been implemented in the Endurica CL fatigue solver with the aim of supporting such applications for elastomer components. The incremental updating feature is demonstrated via the example of a simple transmission mount component. The damage state of the mount is computed as it progresses towards failure under a series of typical loading histories.
Technical Paper

Navy Command Culture Assessments and Error Reduction in Aviation and Aviation Maintenance

2005-10-03
2005-01-3256
In 1996 a series of costly and preventable mishaps in Naval Aviation were determined to be the cause of dysfunctional cultures that existed within the mishap squadrons. Soon after, the Navy implemented a two-part process to root out dysfunctional cultures before they could cause further mishaps. The first step is for the squadron to complete a Climate Survey. The Climate Survey is an indicator of potential problems. The next step is for a trained Senior Naval Aviator to conduct a Culture Assessment of the squadron to accurately define the current culture of safety as well as any dysfunctional subcultures. Over the last five years, the Navy has saved $1.1 billion from the implementation of this program.1
Standard

Emergency Warning Device and Emergency Warning Device Protective Container

1989-12-01
HISTORICAL
J774_198912
This SAE Standard provides test procedures and performance requirements for emergency warning devices (triangular shape), without self-contained energy sources, that are designed to be carried in motor vehicles and used to warn approaching traffic of the presence of a stopped vehicle, except for devices designed to be permanently affixed to the vehicle, and provides test procedures and performance requirements for protective containers for such emergency warning devices.
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