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Technical Paper

Numerical investigation of Electrostatic Spray Painting Transfer Processes for vehicle Coating

2019-09-16
2019-01-1856
In this study we examined numerically the electrostatic spray transfer processes in the rotary bell spray applicator, which is this case implemented in a full 3D representation. The algorithm implemented and developed for this simulation includes airflow, spray dynamics, tracking of paint droplets and an electrostatic modularized solver to present atomization and in-flight spray phenomena for the spray forming procedure. The algorithm is implemented using the OpenFOAM package. The shaping airflow is simulated via an unsteady 3D compressible Navier-Stokes method. Solver for particle trajectory was developed to illustrate the process of spray transport and also the interaction of airflow and particle that is solved by momentum coupling. As the numerical results in this paper indicates dominant operating parameter voltage setting, further the charge to mass ratio and air-paint flow rate deeply effect the spray shape and the transfer efficiency (TE).
Technical Paper

Optimization of CI Engine Performance and Emissions Fueled by Blends of Alternative Fuels Methyl Ester Using Taguchi and Multi Regression Analysis

2019-09-16
2019-01-1893
Today’s frenetic engine manufacturing and transportation sector and its related traces viz; noise and vibration of our modern societies has adverse effect on environment as well as all of us. Modern research affords us the opportunity to understand the subject better and to develop advance technologies. Widely immediate slogan and goal of all industries might be to improve the performance and reduce emission using alternative fuel while, make the quietest and smoothest running Engines. To, reduce the dependency on diesel fuel (Due to rapid worldwide depletion) Biodiesel is one of the immediate, alternative and complimentary solution. In the Present study, to optimize the operating parameters of the Direct Injection Single Cylinder (5.2 kw) CI engine with respect to Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE), Carbon monoxide (CO), Oxides of Nitrogen, Hydrocarbons (HC) etc..
Technical Paper

The benefits of using Composite Bearings in Aircraft Shock Absorbers

2019-09-16
2019-01-1898
This paper will use actual examples from aircraft recently introduced into service, to describe the main advantages of changing from the currently used metallic bearings, to composite bearings. Abstract: The introduction of composite bearing in a recently introduced twin aisle aircraft has resulted in: • Weight saving, by replacing bronze bearings with plastic bearings • Lowering of the particle count in the shock absorber oil, (Reduced contamination with metal particles) leading to reduced wear on seals and bearings. Qualification testing showed that Composite Bearings are able to provide longer service life than bronze bearings.
Technical Paper

Motivation, Development and Verification of a Rapid 3D Lagrangian Impingement Code - Trajectory and Catch 3D+ (TAC3D+)

2019-06-10
2019-01-2011
This paper details the motivation, development and validation of a rapid 3D Lagrangian impingement code, Trajectory and Catch 3D+ (TAC3D+). AeroTex’s motivation to develop a 3D Lagrangian method was primarily driven by the inherent mesh dependent dissipation effect found in their 3D Eulerian Water Catch code (EWC) [1]. Studies performed by AeroTex have shown that for geometries where there are aft impingement regions that are partly shadowed by a more forward impingement region, the level of water flux dissipation can be significant, particularly if the mesh is coarse and the impingement region is far aft. Examples of issues where this may be a particular issue would be impingement on a centerline aft mounted engine or the calculation of impingement on the wing root/belly fairing. The code has been developed around a modified version of the OpenFOAM Lagrangian solver.
Technical Paper

Event-Driven Simulation of Particle-Particle and Particle-Surface Collisions in Ice Crystal Icing

2019-06-10
2019-01-2014
This paper describes an event-driven simulation tool for predicting particle-particle and particle-surface interactions in ice crystal icing (ICI). A new accretion model which is much less empirical than existing models for predicting ICI accretion is also described. Unlike previous models, the new “gouge/bounce model” (GBM) differentiates between (erosion) losses resulting from particle bounce and those resulting from particle gouging. A bounce threshold based on the tangential Stokes number is used to calculate most of the bounce loss. The GBM also predicts ejecta velocities and directions, at least approximately, which is important because most of the mixed-phase mass flux impacting a surface actually bounces off or erodes existing material in ICI, thereby increasing the mass flux downstream.
Technical Paper

Ice-Crystal Icing Accretion Studies at the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

2019-06-10
2019-01-1921
This paper describes an ice-crystal icing experiment conducted at the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory during June 2018. This test produced ice shape data on an airfoil for different test conditions similar to those inside the compressor region of a turbo-fan jet engine. Mixed-phase icing conditions were generated by partially freezing out a water spray using the relative humidity of flow as the primary parameter to control freeze-out. The paper presents the ice shape data and associated conditions which include pressure, velocity, temperature, humidity, total water content, melt ratio, and particle size distribution. The test featured a new instrument traversing system which allowed surveys of the flow and cloud. The purpose of this work was to provide experimental ice shape data and associated conditions to help develop and validate ice-crystal icing accretion models.
Technical Paper

NRC Particle Detection Probe: Results and Analysis from Ground and Flight Tests

2019-06-10
2019-01-1933
High altitude ice crystals are causing in-service events in excess of one per month for commercial aircraft. The effects include air data probes malfunctioning (pitot pressure and total air temperature in particular), and uncommanded engine power loss or flameout events. The National Research Council Canada (NRC) has developed a particle detection probe (PDP) that mounts on the fuselage of aircraft to sense and quantify the ice crystals in the environment. The probe is low-power and non-intrusive. This paper presents the results of ground and flight testing of this probe. Results are presented for ground testing in a sea level ice crystal wind tunnel and an altitude icing tunnel capable of generating both ice crystal and super-cooled liquid. The PDP was operated on several flight campaigns and the results of two will be presented.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study and Analysis of Ice Crystal Accretion on a Gas Turbine Compressor Stator Vane

2019-06-10
2019-01-1927
A significant number of historical engine powerloss events have recently been attributed to ingestion of high altitude ice crystals, prompting regulators to expand engine certification envelopes to incorporate ‘ice crystal icing’ conditions. There has been a resulting effort by OEMs and academia to develop analytical and semi-empirical models for the phenomenon, partly through use of rig testing. The current study presents results and analysis of experiments conducted in the National Research Council’s Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). The experiments used a simplified compressor stator vane test article, designed to produce data to build semi-empirical models and validate an existing ice crystal icing code. Accretion growth rates, extracted from backlit shadowgraphy, are presented as a function of test condition, and the algorithm of a new image processing technique using Canny filtering is discussed.
Technical Paper

Analysis and Automated Detection of Ice Crystal Icing Conditions Using Geostationary Satellite Datasets and In Situ Ice Water Content Measurements

2019-06-10
2019-01-1953
Recent studies have found that high mass concentrations of ice particles in regions of deep convective storms can adversely impact aircraft engine and air probe (e.g. pitot tube and air temperature) performance. Radar reflectivity in these regions suggests that they are safe for aircraft penetration, yet high ice water content (HIWC) is still encountered. The aviation weather community seeks additional remote sensing methods for delineating where ice particle (or crystal) icing conditions are likely to occur, including products derived from geostationary (GEO) satellite imagery that is now available in near-real time at increasingly high spatio-temporal detail from the global GEO satellite constellation.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of a Wind-Driven Water Droplet over the Slippery Liquid Infused Porous Surface

2019-06-10
2019-01-1951
The promising anti-icing performance of the slippery liquid infused porous surface (SLIPS) has been recently demonstrated for various engineering applications. The runback icing for aircraft and wind turbines could be effectively mitigated considering the timely removal of water droplet by the wind shearing force due to the low adhesion on the SLIPS. In this study, the flow field both inside and around the wind-driven droplet over the SLIPS was experimentally investigated by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. Previous studies majorly focus on the internal flow pattern before the droplet incipient motion. In this study, the flow field inside a moving droplet was firstly investigated. As a result of the low surface adhesion of the SLIPS, droplet oscillations were eliminated and the droplet internal flow field could be corrected from the optical distortion.
Technical Paper

Icing Test and Measurement Capabilities of the NRC’s Gas Turbine Laboratory

2019-06-10
2019-01-1943
The National Research Council’s Gas Turbine Laboratory provides industry leading icing facilities that allow manufacturers to develop, validate and certify new products for flight in adverse conditions. This paper shows how NRC measurement techniques are used across the facilities, and presents a literature-review of recently developed capabilities. The overview includes new details on some facilities, and future capabilities that are in development or planned for the near future. Methods developed at the NRC for characterizing inclement conditions are discussed and include the Isokinetic Probe, Particle Shadow Velocimetry, the Particle Detection Probe, and a size-binned real-time thermodynamic evaporation model.
Technical Paper

Validation and Instrumentation of a Small Modular Multi-Stage Axial Compressor for Ice Crystal Icing Research

2019-06-10
2019-01-1940
The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) has undergone the development of a Small Axial Compressor Rig for modelling altitude ice accretion in aircraft engines. The rig consists of two axial compressor stages measuring approximately 150mm in diameter, an extension duct to allow residence time for partial melting of ice crystals and a test piece. The axial compressor stages are intended to provide realistic engine conditioning such as fracture, pressure rise, temperature rise and centrifuging of glaciated ice crystals entering the rig. The rig was designed for use in altitude icing wind tunnels such as the NRC’s altitude icing wind tunnel (AIWT), research altitude test facility (RATFac.), and those of other organization such as NASA Glenn and Technical University of Braunshweig. Previous development work [1] provided partial validation of the aerodynamic performance of just the first compressor stage at 90% power.
Technical Paper

Wind Tunnel Measurements of Simulated Glaciated Cloud Conditions to Evaluate Newly Developed 2D Imaging Probes

2019-06-10
2019-01-1981
Instrumentation that has been used for characterization of mixed-phase and glaciated conditions in the past, like the OAP probes, are subject to errors caused by variations in diffraction on the images away from the object plane and by the discrete nature of their particle detection and sizing. Correction methods are necessary to consider their measurements adequate for high ice water content (IWC) environments judged to represent a significant safety hazard to propellers and turbofan engine operability and performance. For this reason, within the frame of EU FP7 HAIC project, instrumentation characterization and validation is considered a major element need for successful execution of flight tests campaigns. Clearly, instrumentation must be sufficiently reliable to assess the reproducibility of artificial clouds with high ice water content generated in icing tunnels.
Technical Paper

Uncertainty of the Ice Particles Median Mass Diameters Retrieved from the HAIC-HIWC Dataset: A Study of the Influence of the Mass Retrieval Method

2019-06-10
2019-01-1983
In response to the ice crystal icing hazard identified twenty years ago, aviation industry, regulation authorities, and research centers joined forces into the HAIC-HIWC international collaboration launched in 2012. Two flight campaigns were conducted in the high ice water content areas of tropical mesoscale convective systems in order to characterize this environment conducive to ice crystal icing. Statistics on cloud microphysical properties, such as Ice Water Content (IWC) or Mass Median Diameter (MMD), derived from the dataset of in situ measurements are now being used to support icing certification rulemaking and anti-icing systems design (engine and air data probe) activities. This technical paper focuses on methodological aspects of the derivation of MMD. MMD are estimated from PSD and IWC using a multistep process in which the mass retrieval method is a critical step.
Technical Paper

How Dual Polarization Technique May Improve Weather Radar on Commercial Aircraft

2019-06-10
2019-01-1982
The airborne weather radar on a commercial aircraft is essential to ensure flight safety. It is able to detect severe weather, probable areas where presence of hail may be suspected, and thanks to its Doppler capability, the wind shears that may be dangerous when taking-off or landing. However, because it operates at X-band, the picture that it offers to the pilot may be seriously biased in situation of severe weather, in reason of the attenuation of the radar wave. The adoption of the dual pol technique in this weather radar would be most beneficial for the quality of the information delivered to the pilot for the following reasons: 1 Dual pol technique allows to operate a classification of the precipitation: distinguishing rain, melting layer, snow, hail, small ice particles. 2 Dual pol technique allows correcting the return signal for attenuation in rain.
Technical Paper

A Three-Layer Thermodynamic Model for Ice Crystal Accretion on Warm Surfaces: EMM-C

2019-06-10
2019-01-1963
Ingestion of high altitude atmospheric ice particles can be hazardous to gas turbine engines in flight. Ice accretion may occur in the core compression system, leading to blockage of the core gas path, blade damage and/or flameout. Numerous engine powerloss events since 1990 have been attributed to this mechanism. An expansion in engine certification requirements to incorporate ice crystal conditions has spurred efforts to develop analytical models for phenomenon, as a method of demonstrating safe operation. A necessary component of a complete analytical icing model is a thermodynamic accretion model. Continuity and energy balances are performed using the local flow conditions and the mass fluxes of ice and water that are incident on a surface to predict the accretion growth rate.
Technical Paper

Non-Spherical Particle Trajectory Modelling for Ice Crystal Conditions

2019-06-10
2019-01-1961
Aircraft icing is a significant issue for aviation safety. In this paper, recent developments for calculating the trajectory of non-spherical particles are used to determine the trajectory and impingement of ice crystals in aircraft icing scenarios. Two models are used, each formulated from direct numerical simulations, to give the drag, lift and torque correlations for various shaped particles. Previously, within the range of Reynolds number permitted in this study, it was only possible to model the trajectory and full rotational progression of cylindrical particles. The work presented in this paper allows for analysis of a wider range of ice shapes that are commonly seen in icing conditions, capturing the dynamics and behaviours specific to ice crystals. Previous limitations relate to the in ability to account for particle rotation and the dependency of force correlations on the measure of particle sphericity - which are now overcome.
Technical Paper

ICICLE: A Model for Glaciated & Mixed Phase Icing for Application to Aircraft Engines

2019-06-10
2019-01-1969
High altitude ice crystals can pose a threat to aircraft engine compression and combustion systems. Cases of engine damage, surge and rollback have been recorded in recent years, believed due to ice crystals partially melting and accreting on static surfaces (stators, endwalls and ducting). The increased awareness and understanding of this phenomenon has resulted in the extension of icing certification requirements to include glaciated and mixed phase conditions. Developing semi-empirical models is a cost effective way of enabling certification, and providing simple design rules for next generation engines. A comprehensive ice crystal icing model is presented in this paper, the Ice Crystal Icing ComputationaL Environment (ICICLE). It is modular in design, comprising a baseline code consisting of an axisymmetric or 2D planar flowfield solution, Lagrangian particle tracking, air-particle heat transfer and phase change, and surface interactions (bouncing, fragmentation, sticking).
Technical Paper

Simulation of Ice Particle Breakup and Ingestion into the Honeywell Uncertified Research Engine (HURE)

2019-06-10
2019-01-1965
Numerical solutions have been generated which simulate flow inside an aircraft engine flying at altitude through an ice crystal cloud. The geometry used for this study is the Honeywell Uncertified Research Engine (HURE) which was recently tested in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) in January 2018. The simulations were carried out at predicted operating points with a potential risk of ice accretion. The extent of the simulation is from upstream of the engine inlet to downstream past the strut in the core and bypass. The flow solution is produced using GlennHT, a NASA in-house code. A mixing plane approximation is used upstream and downstream of the fan. The use of the mixing plane allows for steady state solutions in the relative frame. The flow solution is then passed on to LEWICE3D for particle trajectory, impact and breakup prediction. The LEWICE3D code also uses a mixing plane approximation at the boundaries upstream and downstream of the fan.
Technical Paper

Predicted Ice Shape Formations on a Boundary Layer Ingesting Engine Inlet

2019-06-10
2019-01-2025
Computational ice shapes were generated on the boundary layer ingesting engine nacelle of the D8 Double Bubble aircraft. The computations were generated using LEWICE3D, a well-known CFD icing post processor. A 50-bin global drop diameter discretization was used to capture the collection efficiency due to the direct impingement of water onto the engine nacelle. These discrete results were superposed in a weighted fashion to generate six drop size distributions that span the Appendix C and O regimes. Due to the presence of upstream geometries, i.e. the fuselage nose, the trajectories of the water drops are highly complex. Since the ice shapes are significantly correlated with the collection efficiency, the upstream fuselage nose has a significant impact on the ice accretion on the engine nacelle. These complex trajectories are caused by the ballistic nature of the particles and are thus exacerbated as particle size increases.
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