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Technical Paper

Modeling and Measurement of Tribological Parameters between Piston Rings and Liner in Turbocharged Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-1440
This paper presents tribological modeling, experimental work, and validation of tribology parameters of a single cylinder turbocharged diesel engine run at various loads, speeds, intake boost pressures, and cylinder liner temperatures. Analysis were made on piston rings and liner materials, rings mechanical and thermal loads, contact pressure between rings and liner, and lubricant conditions. The engine tribology parameters were measured, and used to validate the engine tribology models. These tribology parameters are: oil film thickness, coefficient of friction between rings and liner, friction force, friction power, friction torque, shear rate, shear stress and wear of the sliding surfaces. In order to measure the oil film thickness between rings and liner, a single cylinder AVL turbocharged diesel engine was instrumented to accept the difference in voltage drop method between rings, oil film, and liner.
Technical Paper

Thermal Barrier Coatings for High Output Turbocharged Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-1442
Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are perceived as enabling technology to increase low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine performance and improve its longevity. The state of the art of thermal barrier coating is the plasma spray zirconia. In addition, other material systems have been investigated for the next generation of thermal barrier coatings. The purpose of this TBC program is to focus on developing binder systems with low thermal conductivity materials to improve the coating durability under high load and temperature cyclical conditions encountered in the real engine. Research and development (R&D) and analysis were conducted on aluminum alloy piston for high output turbocharged diesel engine coated with TBC.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Cylinder Bore Coating for Extreme Operating Conditions

2007-04-16
2007-01-1439
Adiabatics, Inc., with the support of the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research & Development Engineering Center (TARDEC) has developed a low cost, durable ceramic composite cylinder bore coating for diesel engines operating under severe conditions. This bore coating is a ceramic composite consisting primarily of Iron Oxide, Iron Titanate and Partially Stabilized Zirconia. It is applied by unique chemical thermal bonding technology developed at Adiabatics, Inc. and is referred to as Low Temperature Iron Titanate (LTIT). This coating has been tested against a wide range of cylinder bore treatments ranging from hard chrome plate to hard Nickel Silicon Carbide (NikaSil) and found to provide a superior sliding wear surface. It is superior because it is compatible against most common piston ring materials and coatings.
Technical Paper

Development of High Temperature Diesel Engine Piston Ring and Cylinder Liner Tribology

2003-03-03
2003-01-1104
Adiabatics, Inc. with the support of the U.S. Army Tank Automotive & Armaments Command has examined the feasibility of using Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) films and Iron Titanate (Fe2TiO5 or IT) for sliding contact surfaces in Low Heat Rejection (LHR) diesel engines. DLCs have long been a popular candidate for use in sliding contact tribo-surfaces where a perceived reduction of friction losses will result in increased engine efficiency [1]. There exists a broad range of technologies for applying DLC films. This paper examines several types of these technologies and their future application to automotive internal combustion engines. Our work focuses upon DLC use for LHR military diesel engines where operating temperatures and pressures are higher than conventional diesel engines. However, a direct transfer of this technology to automotive diesel or gasoline engines exists for these thin films.
Technical Paper

Racing Applications and Validation of a Hard Carbon Thin Film Coating

2002-12-02
2002-01-3296
A proprietary high hardness carbon thin film coating has been used to enhance the performance capability of engine components for racing applications. Coating properties, including high surface conformance, high adhesion, high hardness, flexibility, and low friction produce benefits for metal components in scuffing and impact applications. Methods to validate the coating's properties include surface topography, adhesion testing, hardness and friction coefficient measurements, and wear rate testing. Hardness testing is accomplished with a nano-indentation tool capable of isolating the coating's properties from those of the substrate, thereby minimizing measurement variations among substrates of varying hardness. The nano-indentation tool also measures elastic properties. Traditional lubricated test methods are used to demonstrate differences in friction and wear rates with coated surfaces compared to uncoated substrates.
Technical Paper

High Pressure Fuel Injection for High Power Density Diesel Engines

2000-03-06
2000-01-1186
High-pressure fuel injection combustion is being applied as an approach to increase the power density of diesel engines. The high-pressure injection enables higher air utilization and thus improved smoke free low air-fuel ratio combustion is obtained. It also greatly increases the injection rate and reduces combustion duration that permits timing retard for lower peak cylinder pressure and improved emissions without a loss in fuel consumption. Optimization of these injection parameters offers increased power density opportunities. The lower air-fuel ratio is also conducive to simpler air-handling and lower pressure ratio turbocharger requirements. This paper includes laboratory data demonstrating a 26 percent increase in power density by optimizing these parameters with injection pressures to 200 mPa.
Technical Paper

Advancements in High Temperature Cylinder Liner and Piston Ring Tribology

2000-03-06
2000-01-1237
The high temperature tribology issue for uncooled Low Heat Rejection (LHR) diesel engines where the cylinder liner piston ring interface exceeds temperatures of 225°C to 250°C has existed for decades. It is a problem that has persistently prohibited advances in non-watercooled LHR engine development. Though the problem is not specific to non-watercooled LHR diesel engines, it is the topic of this research study for the past two and one half years. In the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s, a tremendous amount of research had been placed upon the development of the LHR diesel engine. LHR engine finite element design and cycle simulation models had been generated. Many of these projected the cylinder liner piston ring top ring reversal (TRR) temperature to exceed 540°C[1]. In order for the LHR diesel to succeed, a tribological solution for these high TRR temperatures had to be developed.
Technical Paper

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Monolithic Ceramic Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine Components

2000-03-06
2000-01-1236
The future of maintaining a superior mobile military ground vehicle fleet rests in high power density propulsion systems. As the U.S. Government desires to convert its powerplant base to heavy fuel operation, there arises the opportunity to incorporate new advanced materials into these heavy fuel engines. These newer materials serve the purpose of decreasing powerplant weight and develop new component designs to take advantage of improved strength and temperature capability of those materials. In addition, the military continues the effort for a non-watercooled Low Heat Rejection (LHR) diesel engine. This type of engine demands the use of ceramic and advanced ceramic composite material hardware. Furthermore, today's higher pressure fuel injection systems, coupled with reduced air/fuel ratio as a means of increasing horsepower to size and weight, will require thermal protection or change in material specification for many of the engine's components.
Technical Paper

Injection Characteristics that Improve Performance of Ceramic Coated Diesel Engines

1999-03-01
1999-01-0972
Thin thermal barrier ceramic coatings were applied to a standard production direct injection diesel engine. The resultant fuel economy when compared to the standard metallic engine at full load and speed (2600) was 6% better and 3.5% better at 1600 RPM. Most coated diesel engines todate have not shown significant fuel economy one way or the other. Why are the results more positive in this particular case? The reasons were late injection timing, high injection pressure with high injection rates to provide superior heat release rates with resultant lower fuel consumption. The recent introduction of the high injection pressure fuel injection system makes it possible to have these desirable heat release rates at the premixed combustion period. Of course the same injection characteristics were applied to the standard and the thin thermal barrier coating case. The thin thermal barrier coated engine displayed superior heat release rate.
Technical Paper

Improving the Fuel Economy of Insulated Engine by Matching the Fuel System

1998-02-23
980885
This paper deals with the analysis of heat release characteristics of an insulated turbocharged, six cylinder, DI contemporary diesel engine. The engine is fully insulated with thin thermal barrier coatings. Effect of insulation on the heat release was experimentally verified. Tests were carried over a range of engine speeds at 100%, 93%, 75% and 50% of rated torque. Fuel injection system was instrumented to obtain injection pressure characteristics. The study shows that rate of heat release, particularly in the major portion of the combustion, is higher for the insulated engine. Improvement in heat release and performance are primarily attributed to reduction in heat transfer loss due to the thin thermal barrier coating. Injection pressure at the rated speed and torque was found to be 138 MPa and there was no degradation of combustion process in the insulated engine. Improvements in BSFC at 93% load are 3.25% and 6% at 1600 and 2600 RPM, respectively.
Technical Paper

Emissions Comparisons of an Insulated Turbocharged Multi-Cylinder Miller Cycle Diesel Engine

1998-02-23
980888
The experimental emissions testing of a turbocharged six cylinder Caterpillar 3116 diesel engine converted to the Miller cycle operation was conducted. Delayed intake valve closing times were also investigated. Effects of intake valve closing time, injection time, and insulation of piston, head, and liner on the emission characteristics of the Miller cycle engine were experimentally verified. Superior performance and emission characteristic was achieved with a LHR insulated engine. Therefore, all emission and performance comparisons are made with LHR insulated standard engine with LHR insulated Miller cycle engine. Particularly, NOx, CO2, HC, smoke and BSFC data are obtained for comparison. Effect of increasing the intake boost pressure on emission was also studied. Poor emission characteristics of the Miller cycle engine are shown to improve with increased boost pressure. Performance of the insulated Miller cycle engine shows improvement in BSFC when compared to the base engine.
Technical Paper

High Temperature Tribological Coatings for Advanced Military Diesel Engines

1997-02-24
970203
Experimental results focused towards developing tribological surface coatings coupled with liquid lubricant boundary layer effects, for advanced high temperature military diesel engine applications are presented. The primary focus of this work is in the area of advanced, low heat rejection (LHR) high output diesel engines, where high temperature boundary lubrication between the piston ring and the cylinder liner wall surface is critical for successful engine operation. The target temperature focused upon in our research is an operating top ring reversal (TRR) temperature of approximately 538°C. The technology advancement used for this application involves treating porous iron oxide/titanium oxide (Fe2O3/TiO2) and molybdenum (Mo) based composite thermal sprayed coatings with chemical binders to improve coating strength, integrity, and tribological properties. This process dramatically decreases open porosity to form an almost monolithic appearing coating at the surface1.
Technical Paper

Insulated Miller Cycle Diesel Engine

1996-02-01
961050
This paper investigates theoretically the benefits of the Miller cycle diesel engine with and without low heat rejection on thermodynamic efficiency, brake power, and fuel consumption. It further illustrates the effectiveness of thin thermal barrier coatings to improve the performance of military and commercial IC engines. A simple model which includes a friction model is used to estimate the overall improvement in engine performance. Miller cycle is accomplished by closing the intake valve late and the engine components are coated with PSZ for low heat rejection. A significant improvement in brake power and thermal efficiency are observed.
Technical Paper

Low Heat Rejection From High Output Ceramic Coated Diesel Engine and Its Impact on Future Design

1993-03-01
931021
A high output experimental single cylinder diesel engine that was fully coated and insulated with a ceramic slurry coated combustion chamber was tested at full load and full speed. The cylinder liner and cylinder head mere constructed of 410 Series stainless steel and the top half of the articulated piston and the cylinder head top deck plate were made of titanium. The cylinder liner, head plate and the piston crown were coated with ceramic slurry coating. An adiabaticity of 35 percent was predicted for the insulated engine. The top ring reversal area on the cylinder liner was oil cooled. In spite of the high boost pressure ratio of 4:1, the pressure charged air was not aftercooled. No deterioration in engine volumetric efficiency was noted. At full load (260 psi BMEP) and 2600 rpm, the coolant heat rejection rate of 12 btu/hp.min. was achieved. The original engine build had coolant heat rejection of 18.3 btu/hp-min and exhaust energy heat rejection of 42.3 btu/hp-min at full load.
Technical Paper

Ceramic Seats and Intermetallic Coated Valves in a Natural Gas Fired Engine

1991-04-01
910951
Significant reductions in valve and valve-seat insert wear have been demonstrated with the use of advanced materials for natural gas fueled engines. Total valve and insert wear was reduced by a factor of 10. It was demonstrated that the seat insert wear can be completely eliminated by using ceramic materials. All wear is then limited to the valve seat-face. The direct benefits to users of natural gas engines with advanced technology valve system materials can include reduced operating costs, greater convenience, and improved availability.
Technical Paper

Performance of Thin Thermal Barrier Coating on Small Aluminum Block Diesel Engine

1991-02-01
910461
The cylinder of the aluminum engine block without iron sleeve was coated directly with thin thermal barrier coatings of zirconia and chrome oxide. The cylinder head and valve face and the piston crown were also coated. These three engine components were tested individually and together. The fuel consumption performance of this 84 x 70 mm direct injection diesel engine improved 10% with only coated cylinder bore. When the fuel injection timing of the coated cylinder bore engine was retarded by about 2°CA, emissions characteristics were approximately the same level as for the baseline engine with 8% improvement in brake specific fuel consumption compared with the baseline engine. At constant fuel flow rate to the engine, the exhaust and cylinder head temperatures were higher for the insulated bore case. One can summarize the combustion temperature must have been higher and heat release rates were faster in the insulated case.
Technical Paper

Ceramic Valve Train Materials Investigation for Advanced Industrial Natural Gas Engine

1987-02-01
870418
Valve wear has been identified as a major durability problem in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines. Over the years, progress has been made to alleviate this problem through improved valve design and materials development. Recently high performance ceramics have shown promise for wear component applications. This paper presents the results of a valve train component materials investigation supported by the Gas Research institute. Testing tools and methods are described. The testing program culminated in a 300 hour component test in a full size turbocharged natural gas engine. Results of the engine test appeared to confirm preceding laboratory tests. Sintered silicon nitride valve seat inserts and Stellite 6 coated 21-12 stainless steel valves appeared to be the most promising material combination evaluated.
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