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Journal Article

Insights into Engine Knock: Comparison of Knock Metrics across Ranges of Intake Temperature and Pressure in the CFR Engine

2018-04-03
2018-01-0210
Of late there has been a resurgence in studies investigating parameters that quantify combustion knock in both standardized platforms and modern spark-ignition engines. However, it is still unclear how metrics such as knock (octane) rating, knock onset, and knock intensity are related and how fuels behave according to these metrics across a range of conditions. As part of an ongoing study, the air supply system of a standard Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) F1/F2 engine was modified to allow mild levels of intake air boosting while staying true to its intended purpose of being the standard device for American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)-specified knock rating or octane number tests. For instance, the carburation system and intake air heating manifold are not altered, but the engine was equipped with cylinder pressure transducers to enable both logging of the standard knockmeter readout and state-of-the-art indicated data.
Technical Paper

Quantifying Uncertainty in Predictions of Kinetically Modulated Combustion: Application to HCCI Using a Detailed Transportation Fuel Model

2018-04-03
2018-01-1251
Simulation of chemical kinetic processes in combustion engine environments has become ubiquitous towards the understanding of combustion phenomenology, the evaluation of controlling parameters, and the design of configurations and/or control strategies. Such calculations are not free from error however, and the interpretation of simulation results must be considered within the context of uncertainties in the chemical kinetic model. Uncertainties arise due to structural issues (e.g., included/missing reaction pathways), as well as inaccurate descriptions of kinetic rate parameters and thermochemistry. In fundamental apparatuses like rapid compression machines and shock tubes, computed constant-volume ignition delay times for simple, single-component fuels can have variations on the order of factors of 2-4.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Ignition Timing Predictions Using Control-Oriented Models in Kinetically-Modulated Combustion Regimes

2012-04-16
2012-01-1136
Knock integrals and corresponding ignition delay (τ) correlations are often used in model-based control algorithms in order to predict ignition timing for kinetically modulated combustion regimes such as HCCI and PCCI. They can also be used to estimate knock-inception during conventional SI operation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of various τ correlations proposed in the literature, including those developed based on fundamental data from shock tubes and rapid compression machines, those based on predictions from isochoric simulations using detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms, and those deduced from data of operating engines. A 0D engine simulation framework is used to compare the correlation performance where evaluations are based on the temperatures required at intake valve closure (TIVC) in order to achieve a fixed CA50 point over a range of conditions.
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