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Technical Paper

Cavitation Intensity Measurements for Internal Combustion Engines

1996-02-01
960884
Recent engine design trends towards increasing power, reducing weight, advancing of injection timing and increasing of injection rate and pressure could result in increased incidence of liner pitting. Liner pitting due to coolant cavitation is a complex function of many engine design parameters and operating conditions as described in reference [1]*. Traditionally, liner cavitation problems were not detected early in the development cycle. Traditional liner vibration and coolant pressure measurements in conjunction with a numerous amount of expensive engine endurance tests were then needed to resolve cavitation problems. A method newly developed by the author and described in reference [2] for cavitation intensity measurements was successfully utilized to map out engine operating condition and develop limit curves. This method could also be applied in a non intrusive fashion.
Technical Paper

Techniques of Structural Vibration Analysis Applied to Diesel Engine Noise Reduction

1975-02-01
750835
This paper presents several techniques used to define quantitatively the problem of excessive noise through engine structural vibration. These techniques include both operating engine tests and bench tests. In addition, analytical techniques are shown which give a better understanding of how the critical components within the engine cause this vibration. Through the use of analytical and experimental techniques, examples illustrate practical solutions for diesel engine noise reduction.
Technical Paper

Design Aspects of Low-Noise Diesel Engines

1973-02-01
730246
Methods of reducing the noise level of a diesel engine include the suppression of the major modes of block vibration and treatment of the external surfaces. Design methods enable the frequencies and noise levels of these modes to be calculated for a conventionally designed engine. The important modes of vibration, the noise signature and the effect of block modifications of a standard production V-8 engine were found by experiments. These provided the basis for the design of an experimental low-noise engine. Design features include a suffer block, removal of the bottom part of the crankcase skirt, the addition of a single bearing beam, and the use of isolated panels and damped surfaces. The noise reduction obtained was 9 dBA. Most of this is due to the use of isolated and damped nonload carrying surfaces.
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