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Technical Paper

Assessment of In-Use Solid Particle Number Measurement Systems against Laboratory Systems

2020-10-01
2020-01-5074
Euro VI regulations in Europe and its adaptors recently extended the regulation to include Particle Number (PN) for in-use conformity testing. However, the in-use PN Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) is still evolving and has higher measurement uncertainty when compared against laboratory-grade PN systems. The PN systems for laboratory require a condensation particle counter (CPC). Thus, in this study, a CPC-based Horiba PN-PEMS was selected for performance evaluation against the laboratory-grade PN systems. This study was divided into four phases. The first two phases’ measurements were conducted from the Constant Volume Sampler (CVS) tunnel where the brake-specific particle number (BSPN) levels of 1010-12 and 1013 (#/bhp-h) were measured from the engines equipped with diesel particulate filter (DPF) and without DPF, respectively. In comparison against PN systems, PN-PEMS, on average, reported 14% lower BSPN from 82 various tests for the BSPN levels of 1010-11.
Technical Paper

Impact of Using Low Thermal Mass Turbine Housing on Exhaust Temperature with Implication on Aftertreatment Warm-Up Benefit for Emissions Reduction

2020-09-02
2020-01-5083
The present study examines the impact of using low thermal mass (LTM) turbine housing designs on the transient characteristics of the turbine outlet temperature for a light-duty diesel standard certification cycle (FTP75). For a controlled exhaust flow, the turbine outlet temperature will directly determine the impact on an aftertreatment system warm-up from a cold state, typical of engine-off and engine idling conditions. The performance of the aftertreatment system such as a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system is highly dependent on how quickly it warms up to its desirable temperature to be able to convert the harmful oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) to gaseous Nitrogen. Previous works have focused on mostly insulating the exhaust manifold and turbine housing to conserve the heat going into the aftertreatment system. The use of LTM turbine housing has not been previously considered as a means for addressing this requirement.
Journal Article

Development and Demonstration of a Class 6 Range-Extended Electric Vehicle for Commercial Pickup and Delivery Operation

2020-04-14
2020-01-0848
Range-extended hybrids are an attractive option for medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicle fleets because they offer the efficiency of an electrified powertrain with the driving range of a conventional diesel powertrain. The vehicle essentially operates as if it was purely electric for most trips, while ensuring that all commercial routes can be completed in any weather conditions or geographic terrain. Fuel use and point-source emissions can be significantly reduced, and in some cases eliminated, as many shorter routes can be fully electrified with this architecture. Under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Powertrain Electrification, Cummins has developed a plug-in hybrid electric Class 6 truck with a range-extending engine designed for pickup and delivery application.
Technical Paper

Flux Residue and Migration in Charge Air-Cooled Engines

2020-03-27
2019-01-5083
Traditionally, most charge air coolers (CACs) have been constructed using the Nocolok aluminum brazing process. The Nocolok process uses flux, some of which remains after the manufacturing process, and migrates through the intake tract to the engine during normal use. This migration and deposition on engine components can cause a variety of issues with engine operation. Currently the only alternative to Nocolok brazed CACs for engines sensitive to flux migration is vacuum brazing, which comes at a significant price increase. In the effort to reduce cost and increase efficiency, there is interest in whether a Nocolok brazed CAC with a reduced amount of flux residue can be successfully applied to flux-sensitive engines.
Technical Paper

Correlation of Cylinder Head Gasket Sealing Analysis Results between Gasket Element and 3D Continuum Element

2020-03-10
2020-01-0049
A head gasket is a component that sits between the engine block/liner and cylinder head(s) in an internal combustion engine. Its purpose is to seal high pressure combustion gasses in the cylinders and to seal coolant and engine oil. It is the most critical sealing application in an engine. As a general practice, the load deflection(L/D) characteristic is generated by the gasket manufacturer for edge molded or composite gasket types. However, in the case of a solid-sheet metallic gasket, where the gasket is expected to undergo localized yielding to provide adequate conformance and sealing, usually supplier may not be able to provide the required L/D curve due to difficulties to experimentally separate the large loads and small displacements from the elastic loads and deflections of the experimental apparatus. In absence of L/D curve, the typical analysis approach is to model gasket as 3D continuum elements available in ansys by considering nonlinear material and frictional contacts.
Technical Paper

The Thermodynamic Design, Analysis and Test of Cummins’ Supertruck 2 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency Engine System

2019-04-02
2019-01-0247
Current production heavy duty diesel engines have a brake thermal efficiency (BTE) between 43-46% [1]. In partnership with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Supertruck 2 program, Cummins has undertaken a research program to develop a new heavy-duty diesel engine designed to deliver greater than 50% BTE without the use of waste heat recovery. A system level optimization focused on: increased compression ratio, higher injection rate, carefully matched highly efficient turbocharging, variable lube oil pump, variable cooling components, and low restriction after treatment designed to deliver 50% BTE at a target development point. This work will also illustrate the system level planning and understanding of interactions required to allow that same 50% BTE heavy duty diesel engine to be integrated with a waste heat recovery (WHR) system to deliver system level efficiency of 55% BTE at a single point.
Technical Paper

Development of Parametric Tool to Design Base Frame for Cummins Marine Application Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0798
A spread sheet based parametric tool is developed to design the base frame for a marine generator-set. Factors such as engine details, generator details, anti-vibration mount (AVM) etc., that determine the design of the base frame, are set as parameters in the spreadsheet. The spreadsheet has formulae to calculate channel specifications, and AVM deflections. It is linked to channel standards database and selects the optimal channel based on calculations. Similarly, the tool provides guidance in selection of AVM from supplier catalogues, helps to predict number of anti-vibration mounts required and their location on base frame. This spread sheet is integrated with a generic base frame 3D model and 2D print in “Creo 3d modelling software” (Creo), which is auto-updated based on calculated parameters in the spreadsheet. Using this tool, the user can generate a 3D-model and 2D print. This tool helps to standardize the design process and reduces design turnaround time considerably.
Technical Paper

Cooling Fan Selection in Power Car Application Using CFD and FEA Analysis

2019-04-02
2019-01-0900
This paper describes the methodology used to select an application-based fan that has optimum operating characteristics in terms of cooling air flow rate, fan power, and noise. The selected fan is then evaluated for structural strength. To evaluate different fans, complete rail coach under-hood simulations were carried out using steady-state 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. These simulations considered an actual, highly non-uniform flow field. For each fan option, fan power, air flow rate, and surface acoustic power was evaluated. Pressure profiles on the fan blades were studied to assess the effect of non-uniform downstream air passage designs. Surface acoustic power was calculated using broadband noise source (BNS) model in ANSYS Fluent®. Surface pressure profiles over fan blades imported from 3D CFD were used in finite element analysis (FEA) in ANSYS. Analyses were carried out for blade linear and non-linear properties.
Technical Paper

Multi-Domain Optimization for Fuel Economy Improvement of HD Trucks

2019-04-02
2019-01-0312
Fuel usage negatively impacts the environment and is a significant portion of operational costs of moving freight globally. Reducing fuel consumption is key to lessening environmental impacts and maximizing freight efficiency, thereby increasing the profit margin of logistic operators. In this paper, fuel economy improvements of a cab-over style 49T heavy duty Foton truck powered by a Cummins 12-liter engine are studied and systematically applied for the China market. Most fuel efficiency improvements are found within the vehicle design when compared to opportunities available at the engine level. Vehicle design (improved aerodynamics), component selection/matching (low rolling resistance tires), and powertrain electronic features integration (shift schedule/electronic trim) offer the largest opportunities for lowering fuel consumption.
Journal Article

Durability Study of a High Pressure Common Rail Fuel Injection System Using Lubricity Additive Dosed Gasoline-Like Fuel - Additional Cycle Runtime and Teardown Analysis

2019-04-02
2019-01-0263
This study is a continuation of previous work assessing the robustness of a Cummins XPI common rail injection system operating with gasoline-like fuel. All the hardware from the original study was retained except for the high pressure pump head and check valves which were replaced due to cavitation damage. An additional 400 hour NATO cycle was run on the refurbished fuel system to achieve a total exposure time of 800 hours and detect any other significant failure modes. As in the initial investigation, fuel system parameters including pressures, temperatures and flow rates were logged on a test bench to monitor performance over time. Fuel and lubricant samples were taken every 50 hours to assess fuel consistency, metallic wear, and interaction between fuel and oil. High fidelity driving torque and flow measurements were made to compare overall system performance when operating with both diesel and light distillate fuel.
Technical Paper

EGR Cooler Field Return Rate Evaluation Based on Product and Application Variation

2019-04-02
2019-01-0915
The automotive industry drives some of the most stringent product requirements to ensure long product life and customer satisfaction. To demonstrate compliance with these requirements new and more accurate evaluation methods are needed. Thermal fatigue life in EGR coolers for heavy duty diesel applications have historically been a critical focus for engine OEMs. Being able to accurately evaluate product return rates due to thermal fatigue failures gives the OEM confidence that all end users will be satisfied, and allows program management to properly make fiscal decisions. Additionally, weight and cost optimization can be conducted with greater confidence. This is accomplished by accounting for product variation and application variation in thermal fatigue life evaluations. Including these variations requires a simplified numerical method to calculate product life, as tens of thousands of samples will be run through the analysis to represent real life random variation.
Technical Paper

Phenomenological Investigations of Mid-Channel Ash Deposit Formation and Characteristics in Diesel Particulate Filters

2019-04-02
2019-01-0973
Accumulation of lubricant and fuel derived ash in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during vehicle operation results in a significant increase of pressure drop across the after-treatment system leading to loss of fuel economy and reduced soot storage capacity over time. Under certain operating conditions, the accumulated ash and/or soot cake layer can collapse resulting in ash deposits upstream from the typical ash plug section, henceforth termed mid-channel ash deposits. In addition, ash particles can bond (either physically or chemically) with neighboring particles resulting in formation of bridges across the channels that effectively block access to the remainder of the channel for the incoming exhaust gas stream. This phenomenon creates serious long-term durability issues for the DPF, which often must be replaced. Mid-channel deposits and ash bridges are extremely difficult to remove from the channels as they often sinter to the substrate.
Technical Paper

Diagnostics of Field-Aged Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) on Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engines

2019-04-02
2019-01-0998
Three-way catalysts have been used in a variety of stoichiometric natural gas engines for emission control. During real-world operation, these catalysts have experienced a large number of temporary and permanent deactivations including thermal aging and chemical contamination. Thermal aging is typically induced either by high engine-out exhaust temperatures or the reaction exotherm generated on the catalysts. Chemical contamination originates from various inorganic species such as Phosphorous (P) and Sulfur (S) that contain in engine fluids, which can poison and/or mask the catalyst active components. Such deactivations are quite difficult to simulate under laboratory conditions, due to the fact that multiple deactivation modes may occur at the same time in the real-world operations. In this work, a set of field-aged TWCs has been analyzed through detailed laboratory research in order to identify and quantify the real-world aging mechanisms.
Journal Article

Model-Based Approaches in Developing an Advanced Aftertreatment System: An Overview

2019-01-15
2019-01-0026
Cummins has recently launched next-generation aftertreatment technology, the Single ModuleTM aftertreatment system, for medium-duty and heavy-duty engines used in on-highway and off-highway applications. Besides meeting EPA 2010+ and Euro VI regulations, the Single ModuleTM aftertreatment system offers 60% volume and 40% weight reductions compared to current aftertreatment systems. In this work, we present model-based approaches that were systematically adopted in the design and development of the Cummins Single ModuleTM aftertreatment system. Particularly, a variety of analytical and experimental component-level and system-level validation tools have been used to optimize DOC, DPF, SCR/ASC, as well as the DEF decomposition device.
Technical Paper

Alternate Approach: Acoustics and Cooling Performance Management

2018-04-03
2018-01-0084
Development of quick and efficient numerical tools is key to the design of industrial machines. While Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques based on Navier Stokes (N-S) and Lattice Boltzman methods are becoming popular, predicting aeroacoustic behavior for complex geometries remains computationally intensive for design process and iteration. The goal of this paper is to evaluate application Navier-Stokes approach coupled with Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H), and Broad-band Noise Model (BNS) to evaluate noise levels and predict design direction for industrial applications. Steady-state RANS based approaches are used to evaluate under-hood cooling performance and fan power demand. At each design iteration, noise levels and strength of noise source are evaluated using Gutin’s and broad-band noise models, respectively along with cooling performance. Each design feature selected for the final design has lower fan power and noise level with improved cooling.
Technical Paper

Exhaust Heating System Performance for Boosting SCR Low Temperature Efficiency

2018-04-03
2018-01-1428
Real world driving conditions and tightening legislations require improved performance of aftertreatment systems at lower temperatures. Electric heat has been shown to be an effective method of heating exhaust, but having a practical means to provide power and control for the heater has been a barrier for implementation. Recent testing has demonstrated the ability of a 24Vdc heating and control system to effectively heat exhaust using only conventional alternator and battery power sources. Results from transient cycles show the effectiveness of the electrical system and the extent of exhaust heating.
Technical Paper

Gear Interference-Fit Joint Considerations and Design for the Resultant Tooth Distortion

2018-04-03
2018-01-1293
Automotive timing gear trains, transmission gearboxes, and wind turbine gearboxes are some of the application examples known to use interference-fit to attach the gear to the rotating shaft. This paper discusses the interference-fit joint design and the finite element analysis to demonstrate the distortion. The mechanism of tooth profile distortion due to the interference-fit assembly in gear trains is discussed by demonstrating the before and after assembly gear profile measurements. An algorithm to calculate the profile slope deviation change is presented. The effectiveness of the computational algorithm to predict the distortion is demonstrated by comparing with measurements. Finally, steps to mitigate the interference assembly effects are discussed.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Cylinder Deactivation for Improved System Performance over Transient Real-World Drive Cycles

2018-04-03
2018-01-0880
Effective control of exhaust emissions from modern diesel engines requires the use of aftertreatment systems. Elevated aftertreatment component temperatures are required for engine-out emissions reductions to acceptable tailpipe limits. Maintaining elevated aftertreatment components temperatures is particularly problematic during prolonged low speed, low load operation of the engine (i.e. idle, creep, stop and go traffic), on account of low engine-outlet temperatures during these operating conditions. Conventional techniques to achieve elevated aftertreatment component temperatures include delayed fuel injections and over-squeezing the turbocharger, both of which result in a significant fuel consumption penalty. Cylinder deactivation (CDA) has been studied as a candidate strategy to maintain favorable aftertreatment temperatures, in a fuel efficient manner, via reduced airflow through the engine.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Kinetic Modeling of Degreened and Aged Three-way Catalysts: Aging Impact on Oxygen Storage Capacity and Catalyst Performance

2018-04-03
2018-01-0950
The aging impact on oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and catalyst performance was investigated on one degreened and one aged (hydrothermally aged at 955 °C for 50 h) commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) by experiments and modeling. The difference of OSC between the degreened and aged TWCs was dependent on catalyst temperature. The largest difference was found at 600 °C, at which the amount of OSC decreased by 45.5%. Catalyst performance was evaluated through lightoff tests at two simulated engine exhaust conditions (lean and rich) on a micro-reactor. The aging impact on the catalyst performance was different under lean and rich environments and investigated separately. At the lean condition, oxidation of CO and C3H6 was significantly suppressed while oxidation of C3H8 was relatively less degraded. At the rich condition, the inhibition effect was more pronounced on the aged TWC and inhibiting hydrocarbon species from C3H6 partial oxidation can survive at temperatures up to 450 °C.
Technical Paper

Durability Test Suite Optimization Based on Physics of Failure

2018-04-03
2018-01-0792
Dynamometer (dyno) durability testing plays a significant role in reliability and durability assessment of commercial engines. Frequently, durability test procedures are based on warranty history and corresponding component failure modes. Evolution of engine designs, operating conditions, electronic control features, and diagnostic limits have created challenges to historical-based testing approaches. A physics-based methodology, known as Load Matrix, is described to counteract these challenges. The technique, developed by AVL, is based on damage factor models for subsystem and component failure modes (e.g. fatigue, wear, degradation, deposits) and knowledge of customer duty cycles. By correlating dyno test to field conditions in quantifiable terms, such as customer equivalent miles, more effective and efficient durability test suites and test procedures can be utilized. To this end, application of Load Matrix to a heavy-duty diesel engine is presented.
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