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Journal Article

Automotive Brake Hose Fluid Consumption Characteristics and Its Effects on Brake System Pedal Feel

2010-04-12
2010-01-0082
During the automotive brake system design and development process, a large number of performance characteristics must be comprehended, assessed, and balanced against each other and, at times, competing performance objectives for the vehicle under development. One area in brake development that is critical to customer acceptance due to its impact on a vehicle's perceived quality is brake pedal feel. While a number of papers have focused on the specification, quantification and modeling of brake pedal feel and the various subsystem characteristics that affect it, few papers have focused specifically on brake corner hoses and their effect on pedal feel, in particular, during race-track conditions. Specifically, the effects of brake hose fluid consumption pedal travel and brake system response is not well comprehended during the brake development process.
Technical Paper

Technical Potential for Thermally Driven Mobile A/C Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-0297
Aqua-ammonia absorption refrigeration cycle and R-134a Vapor jet-ejector refrigeration cycle for automotive air-conditioning were studied and analyzed. Thermally activated refrigeration cycles would utilize combustion engine exhaust gas or engine coolant to supply heat to the generator. For the absorption system, the thermodynamic cycle was analyzed and pressures, temperatures, concentrations, enthalpies, and mass flow rates at every point were computed based on input parameters simulate practical operating conditions of vehicles. Then, heat addition to the generator, heat removal rates from absorber, condenser, and rectifying unit, and total rejection heat transfer area were all calculated. For the jet-ejector system, the optimum ejector vapor mass ratio based on similar input parameters was found by solving diffuser's conservation equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and flow through primary ejector nozzle simultaneously.
Technical Paper

Impact of Engine Design on Vehicle Heating System Performance

1997-05-19
971839
A global thermal model of a vehicle powertrain is used to quantify how different engine design and powertrain calibration strategies influence the performance of a vehicle heating system. Each strategy is evaluated on its ability to improve the warm-up and heat rejection characteristics of a small-displacement, spark-ignition engine while minimizing any adverse effect on fuel consumption or emissions. An energy audit analysis shows that the two strategies having the greatest impact on heating system performance are advancing the spark and forcing the transmission to operate in a lower gear. Changes in head mass, exhaust port diameter, and coolant flow rate influence the coolant warm-up rate but have relatively little effect on steady state heat transfer at the heater core.
Technical Paper

Dual Fan Alternator Design Analysis

1996-02-01
960272
Component operating temperatures affect both the reliability and performance of automotive alternators. It is desirable to keep the rectifier bridge and regulator temperatures below 175 C because of the semiconductors contained in this area. At temperatures greater than this, expected lifespans have been observed to decay exponentially [1]. The air flow field surrounding an alternator and component temperature fields were investigated with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The objectives of the simulations were to examine the velocity field for the flow passage and the temperature fields for the components. Design proposals have been made to improve the air flow and to reduce the operating temperature. An initial investigation was performed by setting an alternator in a test configuration and applying the appropriate heat generation for each component. The high temperatures in the alternator components occurred in the stator and the rectifier.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Analysis of Front End Air Flow for a Simplified Engine Compartment

1992-06-01
921091
A computer code for predicting cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser has been developed. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, together with the porous flow model for the radiator and the condenser, were solved to simulate front end air flow and the engine compartment flow simultaneously. These transport equations were discretized based on a finite-volume method in a transformed domain. The computational results for a simplified engine compartment showed overall flow information, such as the cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser, the effects of an air dam, and the effects of fresh air vents near the top of the radiator and the condenser. Comparison of the available experimental data with the analysis showed excellent prediction of the cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser.
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