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Technical Paper

The ISS Water Processor Catalytic Reactor as a Post Processor for Advanced Water Reclamation Systems

2007-07-09
2007-01-3038
Advanced water processors being developed for NASA's Exploration Initiative rely on phase change technologies and/or biological processes as the primary means of water reclamation. As a result of the phase change, volatile compounds will also be transported into the distillate product stream. The catalytic reactor assembly used in the International Space Station (ISS) water processor assembly, referred to as Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA), has demonstrated high efficiency oxidation of many of these volatile contaminants, such as low molecular weight alcohols and acetic acid, and is considered a viable post treatment system for all advanced water processors. To support this investigation, two ersatz solutions were defined to be used for further evaluation of the VRA. The first solution was developed as part of an internal research and development project at Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), and is based primarily on ISS experience related to the development of the VRA.
Technical Paper

Development Status of the Carbon Dioxide and Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS)

2007-07-09
2007-01-3157
Under a NASA-sponsored technology development project, a multi-disciplinary team consisting of industry, academia, and government organizations led by Hamilton Sundstrand is developing an amine based humidity and carbon dioxide (CO2) removal process and prototype equipment for Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) applications. This system employs thermally linked amine sorbent beds operating as a pressure swing adsorption system, using the vacuum of space for regeneration. The prototype hardware was designed based on a two fault tolerant requirement, resulting in a single system that could handle the metabolic water and carbon dioxide load for a crew size of six. Two, full scale prototype hardware sets, consisting of a linear spool valve, actuator and amine sorbent canister, have been manufactured, tested, and subsequently delivered to NASA JSC. This paper presents the design configuration and the pre-delivery performance test results for the CAMRAS hardware.
Technical Paper

Development Status of an EVA-sized Cycling Amine Bed System for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Removal

2007-07-09
2007-01-3272
Under a NASA sponsored technology development activity, Hamilton Sundstrand has designed, fabricated, tested and delivered a prototype solid amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor removal system sized for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operation. The prototype system employs two alternating and thermally-linked solid amine sorbent beds to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a closed environment. While one sorbent bed is exposed to the vent loop to remove CO2 and water vapor, the other bed is exposed to a regeneration circuit, defined as either vacuum or an inert sweep gas stream. A linear spool valve, coupled directly to the amine canister assembly, is utilized to simultaneously divert the vent loop flow and regeneration circuit flow between the two sorbent beds.
Technical Paper

Development Status of Amine-based, Combined Humidity, CO2 and Trace Contaminant Control System for CEV

2006-07-17
2006-01-2192
Under a NASA-sponsored technology development project, a multi-disciplinary team consisting of industry, academia, and government organizations lead by Hamilton Sundstrand is developing an amine-based humidity and CO2 removal process and prototype equipment for Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) applications. Originally this project sought to research enhanced amine formulations and incorporate a trace contaminant control capability into the sorbent. In October 2005, NASA re-directed the project team to accelerate the delivery of hardware by approximately one year and emphasize deployment on board the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as the near-term developmental goal. Preliminary performance requirements were defined based on nominal and off-nominal conditions and the design effort was initiated using the baseline amine sorbent, SA9T.
Technical Paper

Toward Human-Robot Interface Standards: Use of Standardization and Intelligent Subsystems for Advancing Human-Robotic Competency in Space Exploration

2006-07-17
2006-01-2019
NASA's plans to implement the Vision for Space Exploration include extensive human-robot cooperation across an enterprise spanning multiple missions, systems, and decades. To make this practical, strong enterprise-level interface standards (data, power, communication, interaction, autonomy, and physical) will be required early in the systems and technology development cycle. Such standards should affect both the engineer and operator roles that humans adopt in their interactions with robots. For the engineer role, standards will result in reduced development lead-times, lower cost, and greater efficiency in deploying such systems. For the operator role, standards will result in common autonomy and interaction modes that reduce operator training, minimize workload, and apply to many different robotic platforms. Reduced quantities of spare hardware could also be a benefit of standardization.
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