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Technical Paper

A Unified, Scalable and Replicable Approach to Development, Implementation and HIL Evaluation of Autonomous Shuttles for Use in a Smart City

2019-04-02
2019-01-0493
As the technology in autonomous vehicle and smart city infrastructure is developing fast, the idea of smart city and automated driving has become a present and near future reality. Both Highway Chauffeur and low speed shuttle applications are tested recently in different research to test the feasibility of autonomous vehicles and automated driving. Based on examples available in the literature and the past experience of the authors, this paper proposes the use of a unified computing, sensing, communication and actuation architecture for connected and automated driving. It is postulated that this unified architecture will also lead to a scalable and replicable approach. Two vehicles representing a passenger car and a small electric shuttle for smart mobility in a smart city are chosen as the two examples for demonstrating scalability and replicability.
Technical Paper

High Speed Ridged Fasteners for Multi-Material Joining

2019-04-02
2019-01-1117
Automobile manufacturers are reducing the weight of their vehicles in order to meet strict fuel economy legislation. To achieve this goal, a combination of different materials such as steel, aluminum and carbon fiber composites are being considered for use in vehicle bodies. The ability to join these different materials is an ongoing challenge and an area of research for automobile manufacturers. Multiridged fasteners are a viable option for this type of multi-material joining. Commercial systems exist and are being used in the industry, however, new ridged nail designs offer the potential for improvement in several areas. The goal of this paper is to prototype and test a safer flat-end fastener whilst not compromising on strength characteristics, to prevent injury to factory workers. The nails were prototyped using existing RIVTAC® nails.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation on Surge Phenomena in an Automotive Turbocharger Compressor

2018-04-03
2018-01-0976
Downsizing and turbocharging are today considered an effective way to reduce CO2 emissions in automotive gasoline engines, especially for the European and US markets. In the broad field of research and development for engine boosting systems, the instability phenomenon of surge has gathered considerable interest in recent years, as the main limiting factor to high performance boosting and boost pressure control. To this extent, developing an in-depth knowledge of the surge dynamics and on the phenomena governing the transition from stable to unstable operation can provide very valuable information for the design of the intake system and boost pressure control algorithms, allowing optimal boost pressure without compromising the transient response.
Technical Paper

Adaptation of TruckSim Models to Simulate Experimental Heavy Truck Hard Braking Test Data Under Various Levels of Brake Disablement

2010-10-05
2010-01-1920
This research focuses on the development and performance of analytical models to simulate a tractor-semitrailer in straight-ahead braking. The simulations were modified and tuned to simulate full-treadle braking with all brakes functioning correctly, as well as the behavior of the tractor-semitrailer rig under full braking with selected brakes disabled. The models were constructed in TruckSim and based on a tractor-semitrailer used in dry braking performance testing. The full-scale vehicle braking research was designed to define limits for engineering estimates on stopping distance when Class 8 air-braked vehicles experience partial degradation of the foundation brake system. In the full scale testing, stops were conducted from 30 mph and 60 mph, with the combination loaded to 80,000 lbs (gross combined weight or GCW), half payload, and with the tractor-semitrailer unladen (lightly loaded vehicle weight, or LLVW).
Technical Paper

Flight Investigation of Natural Laminar Flow on the Bellanca Skyrocket II

1983-02-01
830717
Two major concerns have inhibited the use of natural laminar flow (NLF) for viscous drag reduction on production aircraft. These are the concerns of achieveability of NLF on practical airframe surfaces, and maintainability in operating environments. Previous research in this area left a mixture of positive and negative conclusions regarding these concerns. While early (pre-1950) airframe construction methods could not achieve NLF criteria for waviness, several modern construction methods (composites for example) can achieve the required smoothness. This paper presents flight experiment data on the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on a high-performance, single-propeller, composite airplane, the Bellanca Skyrocket II. The significant contribution of laminar flow to the performance of this airplane was measured. Observations of laminar flow in the propeller slipstream are discussed, as are the effects of insect contamination on the wing.
Technical Paper

The Highway Research Laboratory of Ohio's Transportation Research Center

1970-02-01
700524
This paper presents some of the technical considerations that underlie the development of the master plan and the establishment of design specifications for Ohio's Highway Research Laboratory. It describes the overall features of the master plan and discusses some of the critical design features as these relate to the various tracks and other field facilities. The development of the master plan was guided by a study of the layout of existing proving grounds and by the experience gained over the years in their operations. It was guided furthermore by a set of principles relating to operational considerations, considerations of flexibility in the layout, land utilization, safety, capacity, and cost. Finally, it was guided by an indication of future research and development needs as expressed by researchers and potential sponsors in both government and industry.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Intermediate-Combustion Products Formed in Engine with and without Ignition

1955-01-01
550262
RESULTS of tests performed on a modified type F-4 CFR engine show that precombustion reactions in both the fired and motored engine gave the same carbonyl products. The maximum specific yields of these carbonyls were similar for a given fuel compressed with comparable pressure-time-temperature histories in both motored- and fired-engine tests. As the motored engine seems to duplicate precombustion reactions occurring in a fired engine under normal operating conditions, the authors of this paper conclude that the motored engine, offering ease of control and sampling, is a convenient and valid tool for combustion research.
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