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Technical Paper

Developing a Precision and Severity Monitoring System for CEC Performance Tests

2004-06-08
2004-01-1892
The Coordinating European Council, CEC, develops performance tests for the motor, oil, petroleum, additive and allied industries. In recent years, CEC has moved away from using round robin programmes (RRP's) for monitoring the precision and severity of test methods in favour of regular referencing within a test monitoring system (TMS). In a TMS, a reference sample of known performance, determined by cross-laboratory testing, is tested at regular intervals at each laboratory. The results are plotted on control charts and determine whether the installation is and continues to be fit to evaluate products. Results from all laboratories are collated and combined to monitor the general health of the test. The TMS approach offers considerable benefits in terms of detecting test problems and improving test quality. However, the effort required in collating data for statistical analysis is much greater, and there are technical difficulties in determining precision from TMS data.
Technical Paper

A Statistical Review of Available Data Correlating the BMW and Ford Intake Valve Deposit Tests

1998-05-04
981365
A 100-hour engine dynamometer test for intake valve deposits (IVD) which uses a Ford 2.3L engine was developed by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC). Recently, this test has been approved by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as Test Method D 6201-97. Since this test offers improvements in test variability, duration, and cost, it is expected to replace ASTM D 5500-94, a 16,000-km vehicle test run using a BMW 318i, as the key performance test for the Certification of Gasoline Deposit Control Additives by the EPA Final Rule. As a step in the replacement process, a correlation between valve deposit levels for the CRC 2.3L Ford IVD test and ASTM D 5500 BMW IVD test must be determined. This paper provides a statistical review of available data in an attempt to provide such a correlation.
Technical Paper

Development of Engine Oils Meeting North American, European and Japanese Performance Standards

1984-10-01
841353
The development of engine oil specifications in North America, Europe and Japan has resulted in a proliferation of performance tests of increasing complexity and cost. At the same time, the transportation industry is becoming more international with vehicle populations of mixed national origin the rule, rather than the exception. In this context, regional specification writing bodies are making efforts to rationalize their own specifications and to enter into dialogue with each other. Central to any attempt at rationalization, regionally or internationally, is the availability of high-quality reference oils. Data on two formulations (a passenger car motor oil and a heavy-duty engine oil) which have met major requirements of North American, European and Japanese engine builders are presented.
Technical Paper

Current Developments in Diesel Engine Oil Technology

1978-02-01
780182
Multifunctional or universal lubricating oils which service both gasoline and diesel engines have gained widespread commercial acceptance. Since 1970, numerous changes and additions have altered the performance tests and specifications which define the quality of these lubricants. New parameters include single cylinder and multicylinder diesel engine testing, valve train wear protection, clutch plate friction retention, extended drain interval and lubricant related fuel economy. In response to these requirements, new additive systems were developed. This paper discusses observed base oil-additive-engine test interactions and compares the performance of one of these additive systems to that of the old.
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