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Technical Paper

Cloud Point Depressant Response Effects in Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel

2005-10-24
2005-01-3898
Cloud point depressants (CPD) have been successfully used for many years in low-sulfur diesel fuels. For over ten years, custom-designed, specialty polymer chemistry has enabled refiners to meet cloud point (CP) guidelines with substantially less kerosene. This translates into greater refined yields through cut-point adjustment upgrades and the potential for diverting kerosene to more lucrative market opportunities, such as jet fuel. The practice of cut-point downgrades to gas oil can be costly because diesel fuel generally has greater value. Kerosene dilutions have historically been as high as 30%-40% by volume with low-sulfur diesel fuels [1, 2]. While kerosene addition enables fuels to reach CP guidelines, it may negatively impact the fuel's energy content, cetane number, lubricity, flash point and density. Properly designed CP additives are able to substantially reduce or even eliminate the need for kerosene, thus substantially reducing refinery costs.
Technical Paper

Jet Fuel Low Temperature Operability

2002-05-06
2002-01-1650
Jet-A and Jet-A-1 have fueled commercial and military jets for decades. With -40°C and -47°C freeze point specifications respectively, Jet-A and Jet-A-1 have adequate low temperature operability for the current demands of jet-powered planes. However next generation military and commercial jet aircraft will need fuels with improved low temperature performance to reap the benefits of flying higher, longer and taking polar routes. The extreme cold these new routes will expose jet fuel to makes it necessary to have fuel that flows at much lower temperatures than is currently available. Changing the jet fuel refining conditions can achieve the desired low temperature characteristics however this is very expensive.
Technical Paper

Jet Fuel Thermal Stability Additives - Electrical Conductivity and Interactions with Static Dissipator Additive

2002-05-06
2002-01-1652
The primary goal of the USAF JP-8+100 thermal stability additive (TSA) program is to increase the heat-sink capacity of JP-8 fuel by 50%. Current engine design is limited by a fuel nozzle temperature of 325°F (163°C); JP-8+100 has been designed to allow a 100°F increase in nozzle temperatures up to 425°F (218°C) without serious fuel degradation leading to excessive deposition. Previous studies have shown that TSA formulations increase the electrical conductivity of base jet fuel. In the present paper, further characterization of this phenomenon is described, as well as interactions of newer TSAs with combinations of SDA and other surface-active species in hydrocarbons, will be discussed.
Technical Paper

Jet Fuel Thermal Stability - Lab Testing for JP8+100

2002-05-06
2002-01-1651
The continued development of more powerful aviation turbine engines has demanded greater thermal stability of the fuel as a high temperature heat sink. This in turn requires better definition of the thermal stability of jet fuels. Thermal stability refers to the deposit-forming tendency of the fuel. It is generally accepted that dissolved oxygen initiates the deposition process in freshly refined fuels. While there are many tests that are designed to measure or assess thermal stability, many of these either do not display sufficient differentiation between fuels of average stability (JP-8) and intermediate stability (JP-8+100, JP-TS), or require large test equipment, large volumes of fuels and/or are costly. This paper will discuss the use of three laboratory tests as “concept thermal stability prediction” tools with aviation fuels, including Jet A-1 or JP-8, under JP8+100 test conditions.
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