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Technical Paper

An analytical energy-budget model for diesel droplet impingement on an inclined solid wall

2020-04-14
2020-01-1158
The study of spray-wall interaction is of great importance to understand the dynamics that occur during fuel impingement onto chamber wall or piston surfaces in internal combustion engines. The maximum spreading length after droplet impingement on wall is approved that it can provide a quantitative estimation of heat transfer and energy transformation for spray-wall interaction and further influence air-fuel mixing and hydrocarbon and particle emissions at combusting conditions. In this paper, an analytical model of a single diesel droplet impinging on the wall with different inclined angle (α) under isothermal conditions (liquid droplet and wall with the same temperature) is developed in terms of β_m (the ratio of maximum spreading length to initial droplet diameter) to understand the detailed impinging dynamic process.
Technical Paper

An Enhanced Σ-Y Spray Atomization Model Accounting for Diffusion Due to Drift-Flux Velocities

2020-04-14
2020-01-0832
Spray modeling techniques have evolved from the classic DDM (Discrete Drops Method) approach, where the continuous liquid jet is discretized into "drops" or "parcels" till advanced spray models often based on Eulerian approaches. The former technique, although computationally efficient, is essentially inadequate in highly dense jets, as in the near nozzle region of compression ignition engines, while the latter could lead to extreme levels of computational effort when resolved interface capturing methods, such as the VoF (Volume of Fluids) and LS (Level-Set) type, are used. However, in a typical engineering calculation, the mesh resolution is considerably coarser than in these high fidelity computations. If one presumes that these interfacial details are far smaller than the mesh size, smoothing features over at least one cell, the end result is a diffuse-interface treatment in an Eulerian framework.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Reynolds Stress Model for Complex Flow using CONVERGE

2020-04-14
2020-01-1104
The Reynolds Stress turbulence (RSM) model has been developed to go beyond the Boussinesq hypothesis and to improve turbulence modeling of flow with significant mean streamline curvature and secondary flow. In this paper the RSM model in commercial CFD software CONVERGE is tested for its performance and robustness when applying to complex flows such as engine flow. Several validation cases including flow over flat plate, swirling flow in vortex combustor, diesel engine spray and combustion were selected to test the RSM model. The swirling flow in vortex combustor, non-reacting but vaporizing ECN Spray A (free jet) and Sandia small bore diesel engine case which shows spray interaction with piston bowl are used to demonstrate the benefits of the RSM model over the widely used RNG k-epsilon model without model tuning. The vortex combustor case shows the RSM model can provide good prediction for strong swirling flow.
Technical Paper

Numerical Evaluation of Gasoline Compression Ignition at Cold Conditions in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

2020-04-14
2020-01-0778
Achieving robust ignitability for compression ignition of diesel engines at cold conditions is traditionally challenging due to insufficient fuel vaporization, heavy wall impingement, and thick wall films. Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) has shown good potential to offer enhanced NOx-soot tradeoff with diesel-like fuel efficiency, but it is unknown how the volatility and reactivity of the fuel will affect ignition under very cold conditions. Therefore, it is important to investigate the impact of fuel physical and chemical properties on ignition under pressures and temperatures relevant to practical engine operating conditions during cold weather. In this paper, 0-D and 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of GCI combustion at cold conditions were performed.
Technical Paper

Numerical Analysis of Fuel Impacts on Advanced Compression Ignition Strategies for Multi-Mode Internal Combustion Engines

2020-04-14
2020-01-1124
Multi-mode combustion strategies may provide a promising pathway to improve thermal efficiency in light-duty spark ignition (SI) engines by enabling switchable combustion modes, wherein an engine may operate under advanced compression ignition (ACI) at low load and spark-assisted ignition at high load. The extension from the SI mode to the ACI mode requires accurate control of intake charge conditions; e.g., pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio, in order to achieve stable combustion phasing and rapid mode-switches. This study presents results from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to gain physical insights into mixture charge formation and combustion dynamics pertaining to auto-ignition processes.
Technical Paper

Combustion System Optimization of a Light-Duty GCI Engine Using CFD and Machine Learning

2020-04-14
2020-01-1313
In this study, the combustion system of a light-duty compression ignition engine running on a market gasoline fuel with Research Octane Number (RON) of 91 was optimized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Machine Learning (ML). The focus of this study was to optimize the piston bowl geometry at two compression ratios (CR) (17 and 18:1) and this exercise was carried out at full-load conditions (22bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). CAESES, a commercial software tool, was used to automatically perturb key bowl design parameters and CONVERGE software was utilized to perform all CFD simulations. 128 piston bowl designs were evaluated at each compression ratio. Subsequently, a Machine Learning-Grid Gradient Algorithm (ML-GGA) approach was developed to further optimize the piston bowl design. This extensive optimization exercise yielded significant improvements in the engine performance and emissions compared to the baseline piston bowl designs.
Technical Paper

Detailed Analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Engine Targets Compared To Existing Engine Technologies

2020-04-14
2020-01-0835
The U.S. Department of Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office (U.S. DOE-VTO) has been developing more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that would enable the United States to burn less petroleum on the road. System simulation is an accepted approach to evaluate the fuel economy potential of advanced (future) technology targets. U.S. DOE-VTO defines the targets for advancement in powertrain technologies (e.g., engine efficiency targets, battery energy density, lightweighting, etc.) Vehicle system simulation models based on these targets have been generated in Autonomie, to reflect the different EPA classifications of vehicles for different advanced timeframes as part of DOE Benefits and Scenario Analysis (BaSce). It is also important to evaluate the progress of these component technical targets compared to existing technologies available in the market.
Technical Paper

Comparative Analysis between a Barrier Discharge Igniter and a Streamer-type Radio-Frequency Corona Igniter in an Optically Accessible Engine in Lean Operating Conditions

2020-04-14
2020-01-0276
Among plasma-assisted ignition technologies, the Radio-Frequency (RF) corona family represents an interesting solution for the ability to extend the engine operating range. These systems generate transient, non-thermal plasma, which is able to enhance the combustion onset by means of thermal, kinetic and transport effects. Streamer-type RF corona discharge, at about 1 MHz, ignites the air-fuel mixture in multiple filaments, resulting in many different flame kernels. The main issue of this system is that at high electrode voltage and low combustion chamber pressure a transition between streamer and arc easily occurs: in this case transient plasma benefits are lost. A barrier discharge igniter (BDI), supplied with the same RF energy input, instead, is more breakdown-resistant, so that voltage can be raised to higher levels. In this work, a streamer-type RF corona igniter and a BDI were tested in a single-cylinder optical engine fueled with gasoline.
Technical Paper

Hybrid Powertrain Choices for Emerging Engine Technologies

2020-04-14
2020-01-0440
US department of energy estimates the peak efficiency of a modern spark ignited naturally aspirated Otto cycle engine to be 36%. Atkinson cycle engines are estimated to get 40% peak efficiency. Most engines can achieve this peak efficiency only for a limited operating region. Hybrid powertrains enable engine to operate in this efficiently. Overall efficiency is improved by shutting down engine during idle events and by adjusting the operating speed and load on the engine using electric machines. The choice of the powertrain and component sizes depends on the engine characteristics, drive cycles and vehicle technical requirements. This study examines what type of powertrains will be suitable for more efficient engines that are likely to be available in the near future. Some of these technologies achieve higher efficiency with a trade off on power or by accepting a more restrictive operating region.
Technical Paper

Performance of a Printed Bimetallic (Stainless Steel and Bronze) Engine Head Operating Under Stoichiometric and Lean Spark Ignited (SI) Combustion of Natural Gas

2020-04-14
2020-01-0770
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durability and operational performance of a bimetallic (stainless steel and bronze) natural gas engine head. The performance was evaluated against a stock cast iron head for comparison. During manufacturing of the printed head, efforts were made to ensure that the internal features, including the fire deck geometry for the two head were identical. The engine was operated under two engine speeds (1200 rpm and 1800 rpm) and two Brake Mean Effective Pressures (6 bar and 10 bar). For each speed and BMEP combination, two equivalence ratios (0.7 and 1.0) were evaluated. In addition to emissions and engine performance data, the research team also took thermal images of both operating heads to ascertain heat transfer and thermal loss differences between the two head materials. The results showed that the brake efficiency, coolant and exhaust temperature were the same for both heads.
Technical Paper

Analytical approach to characterize the effect of engine control parameters and fuel properties on ACI operation in a GDI engine

2020-04-14
2020-01-1141
Advanced compression ignition (ACI) operation in gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines is a promising concept to reduce fuel consumption and emissions at part load conditions. However, combustion phasing control and the limited operating range in ACI mode are a perennial challenge. In this study the combined impact of fuel properties and engine control strategies are investigated. A design of experiments method was implemented using a three level orthogonal array to determine the sensitivity of five engine control parameters on four engine response variables under low load ACI operation for three 98 RON gasoline fuels, exhibiting disparate chemical composition. Furthermore, the thermodynamic state of the compression histories was studied with the aid of the pressure-temperature framework and correlations were drawn to analogous HCCI experiments conducted in an instrumented CFR engine.
Technical Paper

Improvements to a CFR Engine Three Pressure Analysis GT-Power Model for HCCI and SI Conditions

2020-01-24
2019-32-0608
While experimental data measured directly on the engine are very valuable, there is a limitation of what measurements can be made without modifying the engine or the process that is being investigated, such as cylinder temperature. In order to supplement the experimental results, a Three Pressure Analysis (TPA) GT-Power model of the Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was previously developed and validated for estimating cylinder temperature and residual fraction. However, this model had only been validated for normal and knocking spark ignition (SI) combustion with RON-like intake conditions (naturally aspirated, <52 °C). This work presents improvements made to the GT-Power model and the expansion of its use for HCCI combustion. The burn rate estimation sub-model was modified to allow for low temperature heat release estimation and compression ignition operation.
Technical Paper

Computational Chemistry Consortium: Surrogate Fuel Mechanism Development, Pollutants Sub-Mechanisms and Components Library

2019-09-09
2019-24-0020
The Computational Chemistry Consortium (C3) is dedicated to leading the advancement of combustion and emissions modeling. The C3 cluster combines the expertise of different groups involved in combustion research aiming to refine existing chemistry models and to develop more efficient tools for the generation of surrogate and multi-fuel mechanisms, and suitable mechanisms for CFD applications. In addition to the development of more accurate kinetic models for different components of interest in real fuel surrogates and for pollutants formation (NOx, PAH, soot), the core activity of C3 is to develop a tool capable of merging high-fidelity kinetics from different partners, resulting in a high-fidelity model for a specific application. A core mechanism forms the basis of a gasoline surrogate model containing larger components including n-heptane, iso-octane, n-dodecane, toluene and other larger hydrocarbons.
Technical Paper

Heavy-Duty Compression-Ignition Engines Retrofitted to Spark-Ignition Operation Fueled with Natural Gas

2019-09-09
2019-24-0030
Natural gas is a promising alternative gaseous fuel due to its availability, economic, and environmental benefits. A solution to increase its use in the heavy-duty transportation sector is to convert existing heavy-duty compression ignition engines to spark-ignition operation by replacing the fuel injector with a spark plug and injecting the natural gas inside the intake manifold. The use of numerical simulations to design and optimize the natural gas combustion in such retrofitted engines can benefit both engine efficiency and emission. However, experimental data of natural gas combustion inside a bowl-in-piston chamber is limited. Consequently, the goal of this study was to provide high-quality experimental data from such a converted engine fueled with methane and operated at steady-state conditions, exploring variations in spark timing, engine speed and equivalence ratio.
Technical Paper

Experimental High Temperature Analysis of a Low-Pressure Diesel Spray for DPF Regeneration

2019-09-09
2019-24-0035
In the current automotive scenario, particulate filter technology is mandatory in order to attain emission limits in terms of particulate matter for diesel engines. Despite the fact that the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is often considered a mature technology, significant issues can result from the use of the engine fuel injectors to introduce into the exhaust pipe the fuel needed to ignite the particulate matter accumulated in the filter during its regeneration. The most important issue is lubricant oil dilution with fuel as a consequence of significant spray impact on the cylinder liner. As an alternative, the fuel required to start DPF regeneration can be introduced in the exhaust pipe by an auxiliary low-pressure injector spraying in the hot exhaust gas stream.
Technical Paper

CFD Investigation of the Effects of Gas’ Methane Number on the Performance of a Heavy-Duty Natural-Gas Spark-Ignition Engine

2019-09-09
2019-24-0008
Natural gas (NG) is an alternative fuel for spark-ignition engines. In addition to its cleaner combustion, recent breakthroughs in drilling technologies increased its availability and lowered its cost. NG consists of mostly methane, but it also contains heavier hydrocarbons and inert diluents, the levels of which vary substantially with geographical source, time of the year and treatments applied during production or transportation. To investigate the effects of NG composition on engine performance and emissions, a 3D CFD model of a heavy-duty diesel engine retrofitted to NG spark ignition simulated lean-combustion engine operation at low speed and medium load conditions. The work investigated three NG blends with similar lower heating value (i.e., similar energy density) but different Methane Number (MN). The results indicated that a lower MN increased flame propagation speed and thus increased in-cylinder pressure and indicated mean effective pressure.
Technical Paper

Development of a CFD Solver for Primary Diesel Jet Atomization in FOAM-Extend

2019-09-09
2019-24-0128
Ongoing development of a CFD framework for the simulation of primary atomization of a high pressure diesel jet is presented in this work. The numerical model is based on a second order accurate, polyhedral Finite Volume (FV) method implemented in foam-extend-4.1, a community driven fork of the OpenFOAM software. A geometric Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method isoAdvector is used for interface advection, while the Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) is used to handle the discontinuity of the pressure and the pressure gradient at the interface between the two phases: n-dodecane and air in the combustion chamber. In order to obtain highly resolved interface while minimizing computational time, an Adaptive Grid Refinement (AGR) strategy for arbitrary polyhedral cells is employed in order to refine the parts of the grid near the interface. Dynamic Load Balancing (DLB) is used in order to preserve parallel efficiency during AGR.
Technical Paper

Zero-Dimensional Heat Release Modeling Framework for Gasoline Compression-Ignition Engines with Multiple Injection Events

2019-09-09
2019-24-0083
A zero-dimensional heat release model was developed for compression ignition engines. This type of model can be utilized for parametric studies, off-line optimization to reduce experimental efforts as well as model-based control strategies. In this particular case, the combustion model, in a simpler form, will be used in future efforts to control the combustion in compression ignition engines operating on gasoline-like fuels. To allow for a realistic representation of the in-cylinder combustion process, a spray model has been employed to allow for the quantification of fuel distribution as well as turbulent kinetic energy within the injection spray. The combustion model framework is capable of reflecting premixed as well as mixing controlled combustion. Fuel is assigned to various combustion events based on the air-fuel mixture within the spray.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Latest Generation Diesel Aftertreatment Systems

2019-09-09
2019-24-0142
A comprehensive experimental and numerical analysis of two state-of-the-art diesel AfterTreatment Systems (ATS) for automotive applications is presented in this work. Both systems, designed to fulfill Euro 6 emissions regulations standards, consist of a closed-coupled Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) followed by a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst coated on a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), also known as SCR on Filter (SCRoF or SCRF). While the two systems feature the same Urea Water Solution (UWS) injector, major differences could be observed in the UWS mixing device, which is placed upstream of the SCRoF, whose design represents a crucial challenge due to the severe flow uniformity and compact packaging requirements.
Technical Paper

Validation of a Species-Based Extended Coherent Flamelet Model (SB-ECFM) in a Spark Ignition Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0222
The Extended Coherent Flamelet Model (ECFM) is limited to lower order upwinding schemes to minimize the numerical discrepancy between species and tracers, which can lead to inaccurate estimates of the progress variable and consequently negative conditional mass fractions in the burned gases after ignition. The recently developed Species-Based ECFM (SB-ECFM) removes the species tracers from the definition of the progress variable, and allows the use of higher order schemes. In this study, SB-ECFM is coupled with the Imposed Stretch Spark Ignition Model (ISSIM) to simulate a spark-ignition engine, the transparent combustion chamber (TCC) engine. To examine the spatial discretization effect and demonstrate the improvement due to using higher order schemes, Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations performed with a first-order upwinding scheme and a second-order central differencing scheme are compared.
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