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Technical Paper

Load and Lubricating Oil Effects on Friction of a PEO Coating at Different Sliding Velocities

2017-03-28
2017-01-0464
Friction between the piston and cylinder accounts for large amount of the friction losses in an internal combustion (IC) engine. Therefore, any effort to minimize such a friction will also result in higher efficiency, lower fuel consumption and reduced emissions. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is considered as a hard ceramic coating which can provide a dimpled surface for oil retention to bear the wear and reduce the friction from sliding piston rings. In this work, a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to generate the boundary, mixed and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes. Five different lubricating oils and two different loads were applied to do the tribotests and the COFs of a PEO coating were studied. The results show that the PEO coating indeed had a lower COF in a lower viscosity lubricating oil, and a smaller load was beneficial to form the mixed and hydrodynamic lubricating regimes earlier.
Technical Paper

Modular Design and Methods to Optimize Seat Complete Assemblies

2017-03-28
2017-01-1309
Modularity in product architecture and its significance in product development have become an important product design topics in the last few decades. Several Product Modularity definitions and methodologies were developed by many researchers; however, most of the definitions and concepts have proliferated to the extent that it is difficult to apply one universal definition for modular product architecture and in product development. Automotive seat modular strategy and key factors for consideration towards modular seat design and assemblies are the main focus of this work. The primary objectives are focused on the most “natural segmentation” of the seat elements (i.e., cushions, backs, trims, plastics, head restraints, etc.) to enable the greatest ease of final assembly and greatest flexibility for scalable feature offerings around common assembly “hard-points.”
Technical Paper

Defect Classification of Adhesively Bonded Joints Using Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Testing in Automotive Industries

2015-04-14
2015-01-0592
Amid all nondestructive testing (NDT) methods Ultrasound is considered the most practically feasible modality for quality assessment and detection of defects in automobile industry. Pattern recognition of the ultrasonic signals gives us important information about the interrogated object. This information includes size, geometric shape and location of the defect zone. However, this would not be straightforward to extract this information from the backscattered echoes due to the overlapping signals and also the presence of noise. Here in this study, we suggest a new method for classification of different defects in inspection of adhesively bonded joint. At the first step of this method, the problem of parameter estimation of the reflected echoes is defined in a Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) framework. Then a space alternating generalized Expectation Maximization (SAGE) algorithm is implemented to solve the MLE problem.
Technical Paper

Surface Effect of a PEO Coating on Friction at Different Sliding Velocities

2015-04-14
2015-01-0687
In order to reduce the weight of an automotive engine, an aluminum (Al) alloy engine block with cast iron liner has been successfully used to replace the gray cast iron engine. For newly emerging Al linerless engine in which the low surface hardness of the aluminum alloy has to be overcome, a few surface processing technologies are used to protect the surface of cylinders. Among them, plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) thermal spraying coating is becoming popular. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is also proposed for increasing the wear resistance of aluminum alloy and reducing the friction between the cylinder and piston. In this work, a PEO coating with a thickness of ∼20 μm was prepared, and a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to study the tribological behavior of the coating at oil lubricant conditions. Different surface roughness of the coating and a large range of the sliding speeds were employed for the tests.
Technical Paper

Effect of Surface Roughness and Sliding Velocity on Tribological Properties of an Oxide-Coated Aluminum Alloy

2014-04-01
2014-01-0957
Aluminum engines have been successfully used to replace heavy gray cast engines to lighten the car's weight and reduce the fuel consumption. To overcome the aluminum alloys' poor wear resistance, cast iron liners and thermal spraying coatings were used as cylinder bore materials for wear protection. A plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique had also been proposed to produce an oxide coating on aluminum cylinder bore. The oxide coating can have a low coefficient of friction (COF) and minimum wear shown in the lab tests. To conserve more fuel, the stopping and restarting system was introduced when the vehicle was forced to stop immediately for a short time. When the engine was forced to stop and restart, the reciprocating speed of the piston was very slow, and the friction between the piston and the cylinder was high. In this research, a pin-on-disc tribometer was used to investigate tribological behavior of the oxide coating on an aluminum alloy.
Technical Paper

The Band Importance Function in the Evaluation of the Speech Intelligibility Index at the Speech Reception Threshold within a Simulated Driving Environment

2013-05-13
2013-01-1953
This study provides an overview of a novel method for evaluating in-vehicle speech intelligibility using the Speech Intelligibility Index (SII). The approach presented is based on a measured speech signal evaluated at the sentence Speech Reception Threshold (sSRT) in a simulated driving environment. In this context, the impact of different band importance functions in the evaluation of the SII using the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) in a driving simulator is investigated.
Technical Paper

In-vehicle Speech Intelligibility for the Hearing Impaired Using Speech Intelligibility Index

2011-05-17
2011-01-1681
Individuals with hearing impairments often report hearing difficulties within the driving environment. This is an ever growing issue given the increasing population of senior aged drivers. In this study, Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) is used to predict in-vehicle speech intelligibility of individuals having common hearing impairments. The effect of hearing threshold levels obtained from audiograms and the impact of vehicle background noise measured for various vehicle operating conditions, road surface types and talker and listener configurations are investigated. This is done by using measured and user-defined speech spectra as described by ANSI S3.5-1997 (Methods for Calculation of the Speech Intelligibility Index). The results demonstrate poor speech intelligibility for most situations considered and provide evidence for the need to improve automotive interior sound quality in terms of speech intelligibility for hearing impaired drivers including aged drivers.
Technical Paper

Engine Fault Detection Using Vibration Signal Reconstruction in the Crank-Angle Domain

2011-05-17
2011-01-1660
Advanced engine test methods incorporate several different sensing and signal processing techniques for identifying and locating manufacturing or assembly defects of an engine. A successful engine test method therefore, requires advanced signal processing techniques. This paper introduces a novel signal processing technique to successfully detect a faulty internal combustion engine in a quantitative manner. Accelerometers are mounted on the cylinder head and lug surfaces while vibration signals are recorded during engine operation. Using the engine's cam angular position, the vibration signals are transformed from the time domain to the crank-angle domain. At the heart of the transformation lies interpolation. In this paper, linear, cubic spline and sinc interpolation methods are demonstrated for reconstructing vibration signals in the crank-angle domain.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Method to Study the Sensitivity of Transmission Laser Welding of Plastic Parts to Interfacial Gaps

2009-04-20
2009-01-1298
Hollow polymer-based automotive components cannot, in general, be directly injection molded because they cannot be ejected from the mold. The common practice is to injection mold two or more parts, and then join these together with a welding process. Of the many joining process available, laser welding has an advantage in geometric design freedom. The laser weld joints are also generally stronger than those of vibration welds because the weld joints are located in the walls rather than on external flanges. Eliminating the external flanges also makes the part more compact. In transmission laser welding processes, the laser beam passes through a transparent part to its interface with an opaque part. The beam energy is absorbed near the interface in the opaque part, and heat flows back across to the transparent half to make the weld pool. So successful laser welds are possible only when there is a continuous interfacial fit between the parts.
Technical Paper

Roof Strength Requirement for Vehicles Involved in Rollover Crash

2008-04-14
2008-01-0510
Rollover crash is one of the most serious safety problems for light weight vehicles. In the USA, rollover crashes account for almost one-third of all occupant fatalities in light weight vehicles. Similar statistics are found for other countries. Thus, rollover crashes have received significant attention in recent years. In the USA and Canada, automotive manufacturers are required to comply with the roof strength requirement of “1.5 times the unloaded vehicle weight” to ensure safety in rollover. NHTSA is currently considering a set of countermeasures to improve the rollover safety, where one of the proposals is to increase the roof strength limit to “2.5 times the unloaded vehicle weight”. This increased roof strength limit seemingly has been motivated based on the benchmark study of current vehicle fleet.
Technical Paper

Noise Cancellation Technique for Automotive Intake Noise Using A Manifold Bridging Technique

2005-05-16
2005-01-2368
Due to considerable efforts of automobile manufacturers to attenuate various noise sources within the passenger compartment, other sources, including induction noise have become more noticeable. The present study investigates the feasibility of using a non-conventional noise cancellation technique to improve the acoustic performance of an automotive induction system by using acoustic energy derived from the exhaust manifold as the dynamic noise source to cancel intake noise. The validity of this technique was first investigated analytically using a computational engine simulation software program. Using these results, a physical model of the bridge was installed and tested on a motored engine. The realized attenuation of the intake noise was evaluated using conventional FFT analysis techniques as well as psychoacoustic metrics including loudness, sharpness, roughness and fluctuation strength.
Technical Paper

Factors Affecting the Tensile Strength of Linear Vibration Welds of Dissimilar Nylons

2002-03-04
2002-01-0604
Three different pairs of high melting temperature and low melting temperature nylons have been welded together using three different design of experiment welding process parameter matrices. An unorthodox analysis of these has revealed that there is a general increase in strength as the total welding sliding distance of the two surfaces increases. This is not surprising. The analysis also reveals that, for a given sliding distance, the vibration amplitude should be large, which shortens the welding time. This strategy produces shorter cycle times and stronger welds, according to the data obtained in these test sets.
Technical Paper

Development of a Plastic Manifold Noise Syntheses Technique

2001-03-05
2001-01-1144
The effects of engine noise in plastic manifolds has been a subject of study in the automotive Industry. Several SAE papers have been published on the subject. Most testing described requires access to engine dynamometers and other elaborate equipment. As part of a general study of plastic intake manifold noise characteristics, this study was undertaken to develop a synthesis bench for enabling low cost noise testing of plastic induction systems including plastic manifolds. Computer simulation of engine intake noise was used as part of a correlation between the plastic manifold synthesis bench and actual engine measurements. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis provided analogous results between the predicted theoretical and two measured signals with a fundamental frequency at approximately 80 Hz. Qualitative and statistical comparisons of the time domain signals also proved equally favourable. Recommendations are included for further development of this approach.
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