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Technical Paper

Autonomous Vehicles in the Cyberspace: Accelerating Testing via Computer Simulation

2018-04-03
2018-01-1078
We present an approach in which an open-source software infrastructure is used for testing the behavior of autonomous vehicles through computer simulation. This software infrastructure is called CAVE, from Connected Autonomous Vehicle Emulator. As a software platform that allows rapid, low-cost and risk-free testing of novel designs, methods and software components, CAVE accelerates and democratizes research and development activities in the field of autonomous navigation.
Journal Article

Gasoline DICI Engine Operation in the LTC Regime Using Triple- Pulse Injection

2012-04-16
2012-01-1131
An investigation of high speed direct injection (DI) compression ignition (CI) engine combustion fueled with gasoline injected using a triple-pulse strategy in the low temperature combustion (LTC) regime is presented. This work aims to extend the operation ranges for a light-duty diesel engine, operating on gasoline, that have been identified in previous work via extended controllability of the injection process. The single-cylinder engine (SCE) was operated at full load (16 bar IMEP, 2500 rev/min) and computational simulations of the in-cylinder processes were performed using a multi-dimensional CFD code, KIVA-ERC-Chemkin, that features improved sub-models and the Chemkin library. The oxidation chemistry of the fuel was calculated using a reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel combustion chosen to match ignition characteristics of the gasoline fuel used for the SCE experiments.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Soot Processes Inside Turbulent Acetylene Flames under Atmospheric-Pressure Conditions

2006-04-03
2006-01-0885
Two soot-containing turbulent non-premixed flames burning gaseous acetylene in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated by conducting non-intrusive optical experiments at various flame locations. The differences in burner exit Reynolds numbers of these flames were large enough to examine the influence of flow dynamics on soot formation and evolution processes in heavily-sooting flames. By accounting for the fractal nature of aggregated primary particles (spherules), the proper interpretation of the laser scattering and extinction measurements yielded all the soot parameters of principal interest. With the separation of spherule and aggregate sizes, the axial zones of the prevailing turbulent soot mechanisms were accurately identified. With the high propensity of acetylene fuel to soot, relatively fast particle nucleation process led to high concentrations immediately above the burner exit.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Boost Pressure on Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a Heavy-Duty Single-Cylinder D.I. Diesel Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0840
An electronically controlled Caterpillar single-cylinder oil test engine (SCOTE) was used to study diesel combustion. The SCOTE retains the port, combustion chamber, and injection geometry of the production six cylinder, 373 kW (500 hp) 3406E heavy-duty truck engine. The engine was equipped with an electronic unit injector and an electronically controlled common rail injector that is capable of multiple injections. An emissions investigation was carried out using a six-mode cycle simulation of the EPA Federal Transient Test Procedure. The results show that the SCOTE meets current EPA mandated emissions levels, despite the higher internal friction imposed by the single-cylinder configuration. NOx versus particulate trade-off curves were generated over a range of injection timings for each mode and results of heat release calculations were examined, giving insight into combustion phenomena in current “state of the art” heavy-duty diesel engines.
Technical Paper

Effect of Injector Nozzle Hole Size and Number on Spray Characteristics and the Performance of a Heavy Duty D.I. Diesel Engine

1996-10-01
962002
An engine emissions and performance study was conducted in conjunction with a series of experiments using a constant volume cold spray chamber. The purpose of the study was to explore the effects of number of holes and hole size on the emissions and performance of a direct injection heavy duty diesel engine. The spray experiments provide insight into the spray parameters and their role in the engine's combustion processes. The fuel system used for both the engine and spray chamber experiments was an electronically controlled, common rail injector. The injector nozzle hole size and number combinations used in the experiments included 225X8 (225 gm diameter holes with 8 holes in the nozzle), 260X6, 260X8, and 30OX6. The engine tests were conducted on an instrumented single cylinder version of the Caterpillar 3400 series heavy duty diesel engine. Data were taken with the engine running at 1600 RPM, 75% load.
Technical Paper

Exploring the Use of Multiple Injectors and Split Injection to Reduce DI Diesel Engine Emissions

1996-10-01
962058
This research uses computational modeling to explore methods to increase diesel engine power density while maintaining low pollutant emission levels. Previous experimental studies have shown that injection-rate profiles and injector configurations play important roles on the performance and emissions of particulate and NOx in DI diesel engines. However, there is a lack of systematic studies and fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of spray atomization, mixture formation and distribution, and subsequently, the combustion processes in spray/spray and spray/swirl interaction and flow configurations. In this study, the effects of split injections and multiple injector configurations on diesel engine emissions are investigated numerically using a multidimensional computer code. In order to be able to explore the effects of enhanced fuel-air mixing, the use of multiple injectors with different injector locations, spray orientations and impingement angles was studied.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Valve Lift Profile on Intake Flow and Emissions Behavior in a DI Diesel Engine

1995-10-01
952430
Variations in the in cylinder flow field which result from differences in the intake flow are known to have important effects on the performance and emissions behavior of diesel engines. The intake flow and combustion in a heavy duty DI diesel engine with a dual valve port have been simulated using the computational fluid dynamics code KIVA-3. Variation of the in-cylinder flow field has been achieved by varying the intake valve timing. Variations in the in-cylinder flow, including a range of length scales, degrees of inhomogeneity in a number of scalar and vector quantities, and the persistence of various flow structures, are compared, and their significance to combustion and emissions parameters are assessed. The interaction of fuel spray parameters, particularly spray-wall interaction with structures present in the flow field are evaluated.
Technical Paper

Multidimensional Modeling of Fuel Composition Effects on Combustion and Cold-Starting in Diesel Engines

1995-10-01
952425
A computer model developed for describing multicomponent fuel vaporization, and ignition in diesel engines has been applied in this study to understand cold-starting and the parameters that are of significant influence on this phenomena. This research utilizes recent improvements in spray vaporization and combustion models that have been implemented in the KIVA-II CFD code. Typical engine fuels are blends of various fuels species, i.e., multicomponent. Thus, the original single component fuel vaporization model in KIVA-II was replaced by a multicomponent fuel vaporization model (based on the model suggested by Jin and Borman). The modelhas been extended to model diesel sprays under typical diesel conditions, including the effect of fuel cetane number variation. Necessary modifications were carried out in the atomization and collision sub-models. The ignition model was also modified to account for fuel composition effects by modifying the Shell ignition model.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Model Development and Experiments

1995-04-01
951200
Progress on the development and validation of a CFD model for diesel engine combustion and flow is described. A modified version of the KIVA code is used for the computations, with improved submodels for liquid breakup, drop distortion and drag, spray/wall impingement with rebounding, sliding and breaking-up drops, wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, multistep kinetics ignition and laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion models, Zeldovich NOx formation, and soot formation with Nagle Strickland-Constable oxidation. The code also considers piston-cylinder-liner crevice flows and allows computations of the intake flow process in the realistic engine geometry with two moving intake valves. Significant progress has been made using a modified RNG k-ε turbulence model, and a multicomponent fuel vaporization model and a flamelet combustion model have been implemented.
Technical Paper

The Development and Application of a Diesel Ignition and Combustion Model for Multidimensional Engine Simulation

1995-02-01
950278
An integrated numerical model has been developed for diesel engine computations based on the KIVA-II code. The model incorporates a modified RNG k-ε, turbulence model, a ‘wave’ breakup spray model, the Shell ignition model, the laminar-and-turbulent characteristic-time combustion model, a crevice flow model, a spray/wall impingement model that includes rebounding and breaking-up drops, and other improved submodels in the KIVA code. The model was validated and applied to model successfully different types of diesel engines under various operating conditions. These engines include a Caterpillar engine with different injection pressures at different injection timings, a small Tacom engine at different loads, and a Cummins engine modified by Sandia for optical experiments. Good levels of agreement in cylinder pressures and heat release rate data were obtained using the same computer model for all engine cases.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of the Ford AOD Automobile Transmission

1995-02-01
950899
A transmission system model for Ford Motor Company's automatic transmission (AOD) system used in the Lincoln Town Car has been developed using the free-body diagram method (Newtonian approach). This model is sophisticated enough to represent the dynamic behavior of the transmission system, yet simple enough to use as a real time computer simulation tool, and as an embedded model within a dynamic observer. The transmission system and torque converter models presented in this paper are part of a larger powertrain system model at the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Technical Paper

Toward Predictive Modeling of Diesel Engine Intake Flow, Combustion and Emissions

1994-10-01
941897
The development of analytic models of diesel engine flow, combustion and subprocesses is described. The models are intended for use as design tools by industry for the prediction of engine performance and emissions to help reduce engine development time and costs. Part of the research program includes performing engine experiments to provide validation data for the models. The experiments are performed on a single-cylinder version of the Caterpillar 3406 engine that is equipped with state-of-the-art high pressure electronic fuel injection and emissions instrumentation. In-cylinder gas velocity and gas temperature measurements have also been made to characterize the flows in the engine.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Fuel Injection Characteristics on Diesel Engine Soot and NOx Emissions

1994-03-01
940523
The three-dimensional KIVA code has been used to study the effects of injection pressure and split injections on diesel engine performance and soot and NOx emissions. The code has been updated with state-of-the-art submodels including: a wave breakup atomization model, drop drag with drop distortion, spray/wall interaction with sliding, rebounding, and breaking-up drops, multistep kinetics ignition and laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion, wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, Zeldovich NOx formation, and soot formation with Nagle Strickland-Constable oxidation. The computational results are compared with experimental data from a single-cylinder Caterpillar research engine equipped with a high-pressure, electronically-controlled fuel injection system, a full-dilution tunnel for soot measurements, and gaseous emissions instrumentation.
Technical Paper

Development of a Self-Consistent Kinetic Plasma Model of Thermionic Energy Converters

1992-08-03
929427
The present work is aimed at developing a computational model of the interelectrode phenomena in thermionic energy converters which will be accurate over a very wide range of plasma conditions and operating modes. Previous models have achieved only moderate degrees of accuracy and, in a limited range, of validity. This limited range excludes a number of advanced thermionic devices, such as barium-cesium converters. The model under development promises improved accuracy in prediction of conventional devices and extension of predictive capability to advanced devices. The approach is to adapt the “Converted Scheme”, or CS method, to the cesium vapor plasma diode. This method, developed at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, is an extremely efficient algorithm for the solution of charged-particle kinetic equations and has been successfully used to simulate helium RF glow discharges.
Technical Paper

Modeling Diesel Engine Spray Vaporization and Combustion

1992-02-01
920579
Diesel engine in-cylinder combustion processes have been studied using computational models with particular attention to spray development, vaporization, fuel/air mixture formation and combustion. A thermodynamic zero-dimensional cycle analysis program was used to determine initial conditions for the multidimensional calculations. A modified version of the time-dependent, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code KIVA-II was used for the computations, with a detailed treatment for the spray calculations and a simplified model for combustion. The calculations were used to obtain an understanding of the potential predictive capabilities of the models. It was found that there is a strong sensitivity of the results to numerical grid resolution. With proper grid resolution, the calculations were found to reproduce experimental data for non- vaporizing and vaporizing sprays. However, for vaporizing sprays with combustion, extremely fine grids are needed.
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