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Standard

Acceptance Test Procedures and Standards to Ensure Clean Fuel System Components

2014-11-25
CURRENT
ARP1953B
To describe general guidelines for achieving selected levels of cleanliness in gas turbine engine fuel system components and to describe laboratory methods for measuring and reporting the contamination level of the wetted portion of fuel system components. As in SAE J1227 (covering hydraulic components) this practice includes guidelines for levels of acceptance but does not attempt to set those levels.
Standard

Fluid-System-Component Specification Preparation Criteria

2013-10-04
CURRENT
AIR1082C
The importance of adequate component procurement specifications to the success of a hardware development program cannot be overemphasized. Specifications which are too stringent can be as detrimental as specifications which are too lax. Performance specifications must not only identify all of the component requirements, but they must also include sufficient quality assurance provisions so that compliance can be verified. It should be understood that in almost every case specifications for components will ultimately become part of a BINDING, WRITTEN CONTRACT (PO). The purpose of this document is to describe types of specifications, provide guidance for the preparation of fluid component specifications, and identify documents commonly referenced in fluid component specifications.
Standard

Nozzles and Ports – Gravity Fueling Interface Standards for Civil Aircraft

2012-01-03
CURRENT
AS1852D
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the maximum allowable free opening dimensions for airframe fueling ports on civil aircraft that require the exclusive use of gasoline as an engine fuel, and the minimum free opening dimensions for airframe fueling ports on civil aircraft that operate with turbine fuels as the primary fuel type and with gasoline as the emergency fuel type. This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) also defines the features and dimensions for airframe refueling ports on civil aircraft that require the exclusive use of turbine fuel as an engine fuel. In addition, this document defines the minimum fuel nozzle spout dimensions for turbine fuel ground service equipment, and the maximum fuel nozzle spout diameter for gasoline ground service equipment.
Standard

Nozzles and Ports - Gravity Fueling Interface Standard for Civil Aircraft

2006-03-24
HISTORICAL
AS1852C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the maximum allowable free opening dimensions for airframe fueling ports on civil aircraft that require the exclusive use of gasoline as an engine fuel, and the minimum free opening dimensions for airframe fueling ports on civil aircraft that operate with turbine fuels as the primary fuel type and with gasoline as the emergency fuel type. This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) also defines the features and dimensions for airframe refueling ports on civil aircraft that require the exclusive use of turbine fuel as an engine fuel. In addition, this document defines the minimum fuel nozzle spout dimensions for turbine fuel ground service equipment, and the maximum fuel nozzle spout diameter for gasoline ground service equipment.
Standard

Recommendations for Fuel and Oil System Schematics

1999-10-01
CURRENT
ARP1482B
This document recommends and sets forth a set of symbols representing the components making up aircraft fuel and oil systems. The intended result is uniformity in system schematics so that they may be easily understood throughout the aerospace industry.
Standard

FLUID-SYSTEM-COMPONENT SPECIFICATION PREPARATION CRITERIA

1992-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1082B
The importance of adequate component procurement specifications to the success of a hardware development program cannot be overemphasized. Specifications which are too stringent can be as detrimental as specifications which are too lax. Performance specifications must not only identify all of the component requirements, but they must also include sufficient quality assurance provisions so that compliance can be verified. It should be understood that in almost every case specifications for components will ultimately become part of a BINDING, WRITTEN CONTRACT (PO). The purpose of this document is to describe types of specifications, provide guidance for the preparation of fluid component specifications, and identify documents commonly referenced in fluid component specifications.
Standard

CAPACITIVE FUEL GAUGING SYSTEM ACCURACIES

1989-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1184A
This report is intended to identify the necessary analytical tools to enable making value judgments for minimizing the various errors typically encountered in capacitance systems. Thus, in addition to identification of error sources, it describes the basic factors which cause the errors. When coupled with appraisals of the relative costs of minimizing the errors, this knowledge will furnish a tool with which to optimize gauging system accuracy, and thus, to obtain the optimum overall system within the constraints imposed by both design and budgetary considerations. Since the subject of capacitance accuracy is quite complex, no attempt is made herein to present a fully-comprehensive evaluation of all factors affecting gauging system accuracy. Rather, the major contributors to gauging system inaccuracy are discussed and emphasis is given to simplicity and clarity, somewhat at the expense of completeness. An overview of Capacitive Fuel Gauging operation is provided in the Appendix.
Standard

FLUID SYSTEM COMPONENT SPECIFICATION PREPARATION CRITERIA

1983-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1082A
The "Scope" section may be a very brief statement describing the coverage of the specification for a simple device, or it may require a long description of limiting parameters for a more complex device or system having a complicated interface definition.
Standard

FUEL GAGING SYSTEM ACCURACIES

1973-01-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1184
It is intended to provide capacitance gaging system "specifiers" with the necessary tools to make value judgements concerning the various errors typically encountered in systems of this type. Thus, in addition to merely identifying the error-causes, descriptions are given concerning the basic factors from which these error-causes derive. This knowledge, when complemented with appraisals of the relative costs of minimizing the error-causes, will furnish the system specifier with a powerful tool with which to optimize gaging system accuracy, and thus, to obtain the "best possible" overall system within the constraints imposed by both design and budgetary considerations. Since the subject of capacitance gaging accuracy is quite extensive, and in some instances very complex, no attempt is made herein to present an all-inclusive and fully comprehensive evaluation of the subject. Rather, the major contributors to gaging system inaccuracy are discussed.
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