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Standard

Sealing of Integral Fuel Tanks

2016-11-23
CURRENT
AIR4069C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents preferred design, assembly, and repair practices for sealing of aircraft integral fuel tanks, including rework of applied fuel tank seals. It addresses engineering designs for integral fuel tanks as they are currently found in practice; and discusses the most practical and conservative methods for producing a reliable, sealed system. Although this AIR presents practices for sealing of integral fuel tanks, the practices presented within this report are practices that are carried throughout sealing that include both pressure and environmental aircraft sealing. Design preferences for optimum sealing are not within the scope of this document. Such discussions can be found in the United States Air Force (USAF) sponsored report, entitled Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Design Handbook, AFWAL-TR-87-3078.
Standard

Sealing of Integral Fuel Tanks

2010-01-14
HISTORICAL
AIR4069B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents preferred practices for sealing of aircraft integral fuel tanks, including rework of applied fuel tank seals. It addresses engineering designs for integral fuel tanks as they are currently found in practice; and discusses the most practical and conservative methods for producing a reliable, sealed system. Although this AIR presents practices for sealing of integral fuel tanks, the practices presented within this report are practices that are carried throughout sealing that include both pressure and environmental aircraft sealing. Design preferences for optimum sealing are not within the scope of this document. Such discussions can be found in the Air Force sponsored report, entitled Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Design Handbook, AFWAL-TR-87-3078.
Standard

Sealing of Integral Fuel Tanks

1998-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4069A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents preferred practices for sealing of aircraft integral fuel tanks, including rework of applied fuel tank seals. It addresses engineering designs for integral fuel tanks as they are currently found in practice; and this document discusses the most practical and conservative methods for producing a reliable, sealed system. Design preferences for optimum sealing are not within the scope of this document. Such discussions can be found in the Air Force sponsored handbook, entitled Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Design Handbook, AFWAL-TR-87-3078. Key objectives of the fuel tank sealing process are to produce a sealing plane that is leak-free and corrosion resistant, especially at fastener locations, at environmental and operational conditions expected for the life of each air vehicle.
Standard

Sealing Compound Aircraft Firewall

1996-11-01
HISTORICAL
AMS3374A
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover sealing compounds which cure to elastomeric materials.
Standard

SEALING INTEGRAL FUEL TANKS

1990-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4069
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents preferred practices for sealing and repairing integral fuel tanks. It addresses several basic fuel tank designs as they are currently found in practice and discusses the most practical and conservative methods for producing a reliable, sealed system. Design preferences for optimum sealing are not within the scope of this document. Such discussions can be found in the Air Force sponsored handbook entitled Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Design Handbook, AFWAL-TR-87-3078. The basic goal in sealing an integral fuel tank is to produce a system that is leak-free for the long term under the environmental and operational conditions expected.
Standard

Cloths, Cleaning, for Aircraft Primary and Secondary Structural Surfaces

1987-07-01
HISTORICAL
AMS3819
This specification covers both woven and nonwoven absorbent materials supplied in the form of cloths. Primarily for use in cleaning smooth or textured, metallic and nonmetallic surfaces preparatory to processing operations which are sensitive to residual surface contamination. Cloths are not intended for use on transparencies. Cloths covered by this specification are classified as follows: Type 1 - Virgin cloth, composed of 100% cotton fibers; Type 2 - Virgin cloth, composed of 100% synthetic or blended synthetic/natural fibers; Grade A - for use in cleaning operations where residual surface contamination levels are exceptionally critical; and Grade B - for use in cleaning operations where low residual surface contamination levels are required. Grade A cloths may be substituted for Grade B at any time for processing operations. Unless a specific type of cloth is specified by purchaser, either type may be supplied.purchaser, either type may be supplied.
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