Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 8 of 8
Technical Paper

Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy for a Power Split Supercharger

2019-04-02
2019-01-1207
Low voltage hybridization (<60 V) supports engine start/stop, regenerative braking, and constrained torque assist/regeneration at a low cost. This work studies the potential benefits of a novel hybrid system, called a power split supercharger (PSS). A 9 kW motor is shared between boosting the engine or providing hybrid functionalities, allowing it to couple with a small engine and still support good acceleration. However, the PSS operation is limited to only one of the parallel hybrid or boosting modes at each time instance. In this work an equivalent consumption minimization strategy (ECMS) is developed to select the PSS mode and the motor torque during hybrid mode. The PSS operation is simulated over standard EPA drive cycles with an engine mean value model that captures detailed air path and PSS dynamics.
Journal Article

Assessing a Hybrid Supercharged Engine for Diluted Combustion Using a Dynamic Drive Cycle Simulation

2018-04-03
2018-01-0969
This study uses full drive cycle simulation to compare the fuel consumption of a vehicle with a turbocharged (TC) engine to the same vehicle with an alternative boosting technology, namely, a hybrid supercharger, in which a planetary gear mechanism governs the power split to the supercharger between the crankshaft and a 48 V 5 kW electric motor. Conventional mechanically driven superchargers or electric superchargers have been proposed to improve the dynamic response of boosted engines, but their projected fuel efficiency benefit depends heavily on the engine transient response and driver/cycle aggressiveness. The fuel consumption benefits depend on the closed-loop engine responsiveness, the control tuning, and the torque reserve needed for each technology. To perform drive cycle analyses, a control strategy is designed that minimizes the boost reserve and employs high rates of combustion dilution via exhaust gas recirculation (EGR).
Technical Paper

Effects of Differential Pressure Sensor Gauge-Lines and Measurement Accuracy on Low Pressure EGR Estimation Error in SI Engines

2017-03-28
2017-01-0531
Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) promises fuel economy benefits at high loads in turbocharged SI engines as it allows better combustion phasing and reduces the need for fuel enrichment. Precise estimation and control of in-cylinder EGR concentration is crucial to avoiding misfire. Unfortunately, EGR flow rate estimation using an orifice model based on the EGR valve ΔP measurement can be challenging given pressure pulsations, flow reversal and the inherently low pressure differentials across the EGR valve. Using a GT-Power model of a 1.6 L GDI turbocharged engine with LP-EGR, this study investigates the effects of the ΔP sensor gauge-line lengths and measurement noise on LP-EGR estimation accuracy. Gauge-lines can be necessary to protect the ΔP sensor from high exhaust temperatures, but unfortunately can produce acoustic resonance and distort the ΔP signal measured by the sensor.
Technical Paper

Modelling and Control of Engine Torque for Short-Circuit Flow and EGR Evacuation

2017-03-28
2017-01-0606
Low-Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LP-EGR) has been shown to be an effective means of improving fuel economy and suppressing knock in downsized, boosted, spark ignition engines. LP-EGR is particularly beneficial at low-speed, high-load conditions, but can lead to combustion instability at lower loads. The transport delays inherent in LP-EGR systems slow the reduction of intake manifold EGR concentrations during tip-out events, which may lead to excessive EGR concentrations at low load. This paper explores leveraging Variable Valve Timing (VVT) as a means of improving the rate of reduction of intake manifold EGR concentration prior to tip-out. At higher boost levels, high valve overlap may result in intake manifold gas passing directly to the exhaust manifold. This short-circuiting behaviour could potentially improve EGR evacuation rates.
Technical Paper

Comparison of High- and Low-Pressure Electric Supercharging of a HDD Engine: Steady State and Dynamic Air-Path Considerations

2016-04-05
2016-01-1035
This paper numerically investigates the performance implications of the use of an electric supercharger in a heavy-duty DD13 diesel engine. Two electric supercharger configurations are examined. The first is a high-pressure (HP) configuration where the supercharger is placed after the turbocharger compressor, while the second is a low-pressure (LP) one, where the supercharger is placed before the turbocharger compressor. At steady state, high engine speed operation, the airflows of the HP and LP implementations can vary by as much as 20%. For transient operation under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) heavy duty diesel (HDD) engine transient drive cycle, supercharging is required only at very low engine speeds to improve airflow and torque. Under the low speed transient conditions, both the LP and HP configurations show similar increases in torque response so that there are 44 fewer engine cycles at the smoke-limit relative to the baseline turbocharged engine.
Technical Paper

Parameterization and Simulation for a Turbocharged Spark Ignition Direct Injection Engine with Variable Valve Timing

2009-04-20
2009-01-0680
In recent years, advanced automotive technologies have been developed to increase engine output power and improve fuel economy. In order to design dedicated control algorithms for these cutting-edge techniques, a control-oriented model is developed in this paper to capture the behavior of a turbocharged Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI) engine with Variable Valve Timing (VVT). In the proposed model, mean value models are employed to simulate the cycle-average dynamics of the airflow system, while a discrete-event model is used to capture the reciprocating engine combustion cycle. This model, established in Simulink, has been parameterized using experimental data that are collected from a four-cylinder SIDI engine over a wide range of operation conditions. The dynamic performance of this model was validated with data collected during engine transients.
Technical Paper

Design Under Uncertainty and Assessment of Performance Reliability of a Dual-Use Medium Truck with Hydraulic-Hybrid Powertrain and Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit

2005-04-11
2005-01-1396
Medium trucks constitute a large market segment of the commercial transportation sector, and are also used widely for military tactical operations. Recent technological advances in hybrid powertrains and fuel cell auxiliary power units have enabled design alternatives that can improve fuel economy and reduce emissions dramatically. However, deterministic design optimization of these configurations may yield designs that are optimal with respect to performance but raise concerns regarding the reliability of achieving that performance over lifetime. In this article we identify and quantify uncertainties due to modeling approximations or incomplete information. We then model their propagation using Monte Carlo simulation and perform sensitivity analysis to isolate statistically significant uncertainties. Finally, we formulate and solve a series of reliability-based optimization problems and quantify tradeoffs between optimality and reliability.
Technical Paper

Fuel Cell APU for Silent Watch and Mild Electrification of a Medium Tactical Truck

2004-03-08
2004-01-1477
This paper investigates the opportunities for improving truck fuel economy through the use of a Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit (FC APU) for silent watch, as well as for powering electrified engine accessories during driving. The particular vehicle selected as the platform for this study is a prototype of the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) capable of carrying a 5 ton payload. Peak stand-by power requirements for on-board power are determined from the projected future digitized battlefield vehicle requirements. Strategic selection of electrified engine accessories enables engine shutdowns when the vehicle is stopped, thus providing additional fuel savings. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is integrated with a partial oxidation reformer in order to allow the use of the same fuel (JP8) as for the propulsion diesel engine.
X