Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 3 of 3
Video

Effective Grease Academy Training for Optimized Wheel Bearing Lubrication

2020-11-03
Grease is a three component matrix consisting of a thickener, base oil and additives. It is really critical to understand grease know how and technology for providing optimized lubrication solutions for many applications. This is no exception especially when the auto industry and the OEMs are striving towards development and making of energy efficient workable components such as wheel bearings and associated units. This academy will address key notes worthy of review and consideration in terms of grease terminology and associated parameters as a source of knowledge that can be used with engineers for a holistic and sustained solution for wheel bearing lubrication.
Video

Metal Oxide Particle Emissions from Diesel and Petrol Engines

2012-06-18
All internal combustion piston engines emit solid nanoparticles. Some are soot particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fuels, or lube oil. Some particles are metal compounds, most probably metal oxides. A major source of metal compound particles is engine abrasion. The lube oil transports these abraded particles into the combustion zone. There they are partially vaporized and ultrafine oxide particles formed through nucleation [1]. Other sources are the metallic additives to the lube oil, metallic additives in the fuel, and debris from the catalytic coatings in the exhaust-gas emission control devices. The formation process results in extremely fine particles, typically smaller than 50 nm. Thus they intrude through the alveolar membranes directly into the human organism. The consequent health risk necessitates a careful investigation of these emissions and effective curtailment.
Video

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants or Lubricant Additives

2012-05-10
For internal combustion engines and industrial machinery, it is well recognized that the most cost-effective way of reducing energy consumption and extending service life is through lubricant development. This presentation summarizes our recent R&D achievements on developing a new class of candidate lubricants or oil additives ionic liquids (ILs). Features of ILs making them attractive for lubrication include high thermal stability, low vapor pressure, non-flammability, and intrinsic high polarity. When used as neat lubricants, selected ILs demonstrated lower friction under elastohydrodynamic lubrication and less wear at boundary lubrication benchmarked against fully-formulated engine oils in our bench tests. More encouragingly, a group of non-corrosive, oil-miscible ILs has recently been developed and demonstrated multiple additive functionalities including anti-wear and friction modifier when blended into hydrocarbon base oils.
X