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Technical Paper

Design of a Cover Plate Cum Powerpack Loading Platform for Armoured Engineering Vehicles

2020-09-25
2020-28-0356
Armoured engineering vehicles are a class of vehicles that cater to the engineering needs such as repair, recovery, technical maintenance, clearing obstacles etc. in field conditions for Main Battle Tanks (MBTs) during times of combat. In addition to the above needs, such vehicles are also supposed to carry sufficient spares including a spare powerpack that includes an engine cum transmission for MBTs as a piggyback during field replacement. Such requirements entail challenges in the design as locating such a powerpack on the vehicle impose additional structural strengthening and stability concerns during both static and dynamic conditions without obviating the need to carry vehicle spares and weight constraints. This paper tries to address these design challenges through a case study, wherein a cover plate that is supposed to seal the powerpack compartment from dust and water ingress is converted to a cover plate cum loading platform.
Standard

Automotive Gear Lubricants for Commercial and Military Use

2020-07-01
WIP
J2360
The gear lubricants covered by this standard exceed American Petroleum Institute (API) Service Classification API GL-5 and are intended for hypoid-type, automotive gear units, operating under conditions of high-speed/shock load and low speed/high-torque. These lubricants may be appropriate for other gear applications where the position of the shafts relative to each other and the type of gear flank contact involve a large percentage of sliding contact. Such applications typically require extreme pressure (EP) additives to prevent the adhesion and subsequent tearing away of material from the loaded gear flanks. These lubricants are not appropriate for the lubrication of worm gears. Appendix A is a mandatory part of this standard. The information contained in Appendix A is intended for the demonstration of compliance with the requirements of this standard and for listing on the Qualified Products List (QPL) administered by the Lubricant Review Institute (LRI).
Standard

Automotive Gear Lubricants for Commercial and Military Use

2019-01-07
CURRENT
J2360_201901
The gear lubricants covered by this standard exceed American Petroleum Institute (API) Service Classification API GL-5 and are intended for hypoid-type, automotive gear units, operating under conditions of high-speed/shock load and low-speed/high-torque. These lubricants may be appropriate for other gear applications where the position of the shafts relative to each other and the type of gear flank contact involve a large percentage of sliding contact. Such applications typically require extreme pressure (EP) additives to prevent the adhesion and subsequent tearing away of material from the loaded gear flanks. These lubricants are not appropriate for the lubrication of worm gears. Appendix A is a mandatory part of this standard. The information contained in Appendix A is intended for the demonstration of compliance with the requirements of this standard and for listing on the Qualified Products List (QPL) administered by the Lubricant Review Institute (LRI).
Technical Paper

Computing Remaining Fatigue Life Under Incrementally Updated Loading Histories

2018-04-03
2018-01-0623
After manufacture, every military vehicle experiences a unique history of dynamic loads, depending on loads carried, missions completed, etc. Damage accumulates in vehicle structures and components accordingly, leading eventually to failures that can be difficult to anticipate, and to unpredictable consequences for mission objectives. The advent of simulation-based fatigue life prediction tools opens a path to Digital Twin based solutions for tracking damage, and for gaining control over vehicle reliability. An incremental damage updating feature has now been implemented in the Endurica CL fatigue solver with the aim of supporting such applications for elastomer components. The incremental updating feature is demonstrated via the example of a simple transmission mount component. The damage state of the mount is computed as it progresses towards failure under a series of typical loading histories.
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