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Technical Paper

Wear Performances of Gray Cast Iron Brake Rotor with Plasma Electrolytic Aluminating Coating against Different Pads

2020-10-05
2020-01-1623
Gray cast iron brake rotor experiences substantial wear during the braking and contributes largely to the wear debris emissions. Surface coating on the gray cast iron rotor represents a trending approach dealing with the problems. In this research, a new plasma electrolytic aluminating (PEA) process was used for preparing an alumina-based ceramic coating with metallurgical bonding to the gray cast iron. Three different types of brake pads (ceramic, semi-metallic and non asbestos organic (NAO)) were used for tribotests. Performances of PEA coatings vs. different brake pad materials were comparatively investigated with respect to their coefficients of friction (COFs) and wear. The PEA-coated brake rotor has a dimple-like surface which promotes the formation of a thin transferred film to protect the rotor from wear. The transferred film materials come from the wear debris of the pads. The secondary plateaus are regenerated on the brake pads through compacting wear debris of the pads.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of a Low-Metals, Non-Petrochemical Coke for Use in Automotive Friction Materials

2020-10-05
2020-01-1603
A study was performed to compare the performance of automotive friction elements, each manufactured with one of two different coke fillers. Coke #1 is a conventional calcined petroleum coke, and coke #2 a proprietary, calcined coke manufactured from a non-petrochemical feedstock. Subject coke materials were fully characterized, physically and chemically. Both coke materials are similar in their respective physical properties, including morphology, hardness, and crush strength. However, there is a significant difference in the trace metal content of the two materials, with coke #1 containing a higher content of sulfur, calcium, iron, nickel, and vanadium than coke #2. Nickel and vanadium are considered potential environmental hazards. Initial friction element evaluation was performed using the J661 Brake Lining Quality Test Procedure (Chase Test). Ultimately each coke material was formulated into two different automotive brake elements.
Technical Paper

Numerical Characterization of Brake System Cooling, Aerodynamic, and Particle Soiling Performances under Driving Conditions

2020-10-05
2020-01-1622
Effective cooling of a heated brake system is critical for vehicle safety and reliability. While some flow devices can redirect airflow more favorably for convective cooling, such a change typically accompanies side effects, such as increased aerodynamic drag and inferior control of brake dust particles. The former is critical for fuel efficiency while the latter for vehicle’s soiling and corrosion as well as non-exhaust emissions. These competing objectives are assessed in this study based on the numerical simulations of an installed brake system under driving conditions. The thermal behavior of the brake system as well as aerodynamic impact and brake dust particle deposition on areas of interest are solved using a coupled 3D transient flow solver, PowerFLOW. Typical design considerations related to enhanced brake cooling, such as cooling duct, wheel deflector, and brake air deflector, are characterized to evaluate the thermal, aerodynamic and soiling performance targets.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Tonal Noise at Automotive Side Mirrors Due to Aeroacoustic Feedback

2020-09-30
2020-01-1514
In addition to the typical broadband noise character of wind noise, tonal noise phenomena can be much more disruptive, regardless of the overall interior noise quality of the vehicle. Whistling sounds usually occur by flow over sharp edges and resonant gaps, but can also be caused by the feedback of sound waves with laminar boundary layers or separation bubbles and the resulting frequency-selective growth of boundary layer instabilities. Such aeroacoustic feedback can e.g. occur at the side mirror of a vehicle and one compellingly needs the coupling of acoustic and flow field. A compressible large eddy simulation (LES) is in principle suitable but one has to take care of any numerical artifacts which can disturb the entire acoustic field. This paper describes the possibility to resolve aeroacoustic feedback with a commercial 2nd/3rd order finite volume CFD code.
Technical Paper

Simulating and Optimizing the Dynamic Chassis Forces of the Audi e-tron

2020-09-30
2020-01-1521
With battery electric vehicles (BEV), due to the absence of the combustion process, the rolling noise comes even more into play. The BEV technology also leads to different concepts of how to mount the electric engine in the car. Commonly, also applied with the Audi e-tron, the rear engine is mounted on a subframe, which again is connected to the body structure. This concept leads to a better insulation in the high frequency range, yet it bears some problems in designing the mounts for ride comfort (up to 20Hz) or body boom (up to 70Hz). Commonly engine mounts are laid-out based on driving comfort (up to 20Hz). The current paper presents a new method to find an optimal mount design (concerning the stiffness) in order to reduce the dynamic chassis forces which are transferred to the body up to 100Hz. This directly comes along with a reduction of the sound pressure level for the ‘body boom’ phenomena.
Technical Paper

Effects of On-Road Conditions on HVAC Noise

2020-09-30
2020-01-1555
Noise inside the passenger cabin is made up of multiple sources. A significant reduction of the major sound sources such as the engine, wind and tire noise helped to improve the comfort for passengers. As a consequence, the HVAC sound (heating, ventilation and air-conditioning) is unmasked as a primary noise source inside the passenger cabin and has to be taken into consideration when designing passenger cabin sound. While HVAC sound is often evaluated at stop, the most common situation of its use is while driving. In case of fresh air as mode of operation, the HVAC system is coupled to the environment through the air intake. Any change in the boundary conditions due to on-road driving events and gusts of wind affects the flow field in the HVAC system and in turn influences HVAC noise. This study investigates the effect of mass flow and pressure fluctuations on the HVAC noise. In a first step, major influences on the HVAC system are identified in an on-road test.
Technical Paper

3D Audio Reproduction via Headrest equipped with Loudspeakers – Investigations on Acoustical Design Criteria

2020-09-30
2020-01-1567
This paper focuses on the analysis and evaluation of acoustical design criteria to produce a plausible 3D sound field solely via headrest with integrated loudspeakers at the driver/passenger seats in the car cabin. Existing audio systems in cars utilize several distributed loudspeakers to support passengers with sound. Such configurations suffer from individual 3D audio information at each position. Therefore, we present a convincing minimal setup focusing sound solely at the passenger’s ears. The design itself plays a critical role for the optimal reproduction and control of a sound field for a specific 3D audio application. Moreover, the design facilitates the 3D audio reproduction of common channel-based, scene-based, and object-based audio formats. In addition, 3D audio reproduction enables to represent warnings regarding monitoring of the vehicle status (e.g.: seat belts, direction indicator, open doors, luggage compartment) in spatial accordance.
Technical Paper

Concept Study on Windshield Actuation for Active Control of Wind Noise in a Passenger Car

2020-09-30
2020-01-1535
The windshield is an integral part of almost every modern passenger car. Combined with current developments in the automotive industry such as electrification and the integration of lightweight material systems, the reduction of interior noise caused by stochastic and transient wind excitation is deemed to be an increasing challenge for future NVH measures. Active control systems have proven to be a viable alternative compared to traditional passive NVH measures in different areas. However, for windshield actuation there are neither comparative studies nor actually established actuation concepts available to the automotive industry. Based upon a numerical simulation of an installed windshield of a medium-sized car, this paper illustrates a conceptual study of both the evaluation of optimal positioning as well as a consideration of different electromechanical activation measures.
Technical Paper

Study of the Glass Contribution to the Interior Acoustics of a Car and Related Countermeasures

2020-09-30
2020-01-1585
This paper shows that the collaboration between a glass manufacturer and a passive acoustic treatment manufacturer can bring different benefits and considerably improve the interior acoustics of a vehicle. In terms of passenger safety and well-being, glazing have always played a key role by offering solutions to interior comfort, particularly when it comes to heat and acoustics. Today, cars are becoming a living space which from an acoustic point of view brings a challenge for the interior comfort. Indeed, glazing has no absorption and classically it has an acoustic insulation weakness around its coincident frequency. In most of the cases, these different aspects make glazing one of the main contributors to the sound pressure level in the passenger compartment, and the trend is not one of change. However, there are possible countermeasures. One of which is the use of laminated glazing with acoustic PVB.
Technical Paper

Squeak Noise Prediction of a Door Trim Panel Using Harmonic Balance Method

2020-09-30
2020-01-1577
Squeak and rattle noise in a vehicle's interior is perceived as an annoying sound by customers. Since persistent noise (e.g. engine, wind, or drive train noise) has been reduced continuously during the last decades, the elimination of sounds, which have their origin in the vehicle's interior components, is getting more important. Therefore, noise prediction based on simulation models is useful, since design changes can be realized at lower costs in early virtual development phases. For this task, linear simulation methods are state of the art for the identification of noise risk, but in general without knowing if a sound is audible or not. First approaches have been developed based on the Harmonic Balance Method to predict squeak noise and assess their audibility. This paper presents vibroacoustic measurements at a door trim panel for squeaking and non-squeaking configurations. Vibrations are excited harmonically by a force controlled low noise shaker.
Technical Paper

Reinforcement of Low-Frequency Sound by Using a Panel Speaker Attached to the Roof Panel of a Passenger Car

2020-09-30
2020-01-1570
The woofer in a car should be large to cover the low frequencies, so it is heavy and needs an ample space to be installed in a passenger car. The geometry of the woofer should conform to the limited available space and layout in general. In many cases, the passengers feel that the low-frequency contents are not satisfactory although the speaker specification covers the low frequencies. In this work, a thin panel is installed between the roof liner and the roof panel, and it is used as the woofer. The vibration field is controlled by many small actuators to create the speaker and baffle zones to avoid the sound distortion due to the modal interaction. The generation of speaker and baffle zones follows the inverse vibro-acoustic rendering technique. In the actual implementation, a thin acrylic plate of 0.53ⅹ0.2 m2 is used as the radiator panel, and the control actuator array is composed of 16 moving-coil actuators.
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