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Training / Education

Introduction to Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Product and Process

2021-08-30
Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a systematic method for preventing failure through the discovery and mitigation of potential failure modes and their cause mechanisms. Actions are developed in a team environment and address each high: severity, occurrence or detection ranking indicated by the analysis. Completed FMEA actions result in improved product performance, reduced warranty and increased product quality.
Training / Education

AS13004 Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (PFMEA) and Control Plans

2021-05-18
In the Aerospace Industry there is a growing focus on Defect Prevention to ensure that quality goals are met. Process Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (PFMEA) and Control Plan activities described in AS13004 are recognized as being one of the most effective, on the journey to Zero Defects. This two-day course is designed to explain the core tools of Process Flow Diagrams, Process Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (PFMEA) and Control Plans as described in AS13004. It will show the links to other quality tools such as Design FMEA, Characteristics Matrix and Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA).
Training / Education

Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFM/DFA)

2021-02-15
This seminar provides both a functional understanding of the principles involved in conducting a Design for Manufacture/Design for Assembly (DFM/DFA) study and the process for implementing a DFM/DFA culture into the organization. DFM/DFA principles can apply to both manual and automated processes resulting in significant cost savings through not only simpler designs with fewer components but also analyses workstation setup and workflow, part orientations during build, and design considerations such as component placement, tolerancing and servicing considerations.
Technical Paper

Wall Heat Flux on Impinging Diesel Spray Flame: Effect of Hole Size and Rail Pressure under Similar Injection Rate Condition

2020-10-30
2020-32-2313
The fuel economy of recent small size DI diesel engines has become more and more efficient. However, heat loss is still one of the major factors contributing to a substantial amount of energy loss in engines. In order to a full understanding of the heat loss mechanism from combustion gas to cylinder wall, the effect of hole size and rail pressure under similar injection rate conditions on transient heat flux to the wall were investigated. Using a constant volume vessel with a fixed impingement wall, the study measured the surface heat flux of the wall at the locations of spray flame impingement using three thin-film thermocouple heat-flux sensors. The results showed that the characteristic of local heat flux and soot distribution was almost similar by controlling similar injection rate except for the small nozzle hole size with increasing injection pressure.
Technical Paper

Investigations on NOx and Smoke Emissions Reduction Potential through Diesel-Water Emulsion and Water Fumigation in a Small Bore Diesel Engine

2020-10-30
2020-32-2312
In the present work, a relative comparison of addition of water to diesel through emulsion and fumigation methods is explored for reducing oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and smoke emissions in a production small bore diesel engine. The water to diesel ratio was kept the same in both the methods at a lower concentration of 3% by mass to avoid any adverse effects on the engine system components. The experiments were conducted at a rated engine speed of 1500 rpm under varying load conditions. A stable water-diesel emulsion was prepared using a combination of equal proportions (1:1 by volume) of Span 80 and Tween 80. The mixture of Span 80 in diesel and Tween 80 in water was homogenized using an IKA Ultra Turrax homogenizer with tip stator diameter 18mm at 5000 rpm for 2 minutes. The water-in-diesel emulsions thus formulated were kinetically stable and appeared translucent. No phase separation was observed on storage for approximately 105 days.
Training / Education

Design for Manufacturing & Assembly (DFM/DFA)

2020-10-06
Discounted pricing is in effect during the COVID-19 pandemic. Registration fees of $1355 applies to the special live, online August 3, 2020 offering. Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFM+A), pioneered by Boothroyd and Dewhurst, has been used by many companies around the world to develop creative product designs that use optimal manufacturing and assembly processes. Correctly applied, DFM+A analysis leads to significant reductions in production cost, without compromising product time-to-market goals, functionality, quality, serviceability, or other attributes.
Technical Paper

Development of Friction Materials Regulations for Four Latin American Countries

2020-10-05
2020-01-1615
Brakes are the most important safety device in a vehicle, however there are few barriers to manufacture, import, or sell friction materials in most of the countries, including USA. European countries, with the ECE R90 program, are a big exception. International Transport Forum published in 2016 the “Benchmarking of road safety in Latin America” report, it mentions that worldwide 17.5 people in every 100,000 die in road accidents, however Andean countries mortality rate is 23.4 and South American 21.0, considerably higher than the worldwide average.
Technical Paper

Wear Performances of Gray Cast Iron Brake Rotor with Plasma Electrolytic Aluminating Coating against Different Pads

2020-10-05
2020-01-1623
Gray cast iron brake rotor experiences substantial wear during the braking and contributes largely to the wear debris emissions. Surface coating on the gray cast iron rotor represents a trending approach dealing with the problems. In this research, a new plasma electrolytic aluminating (PEA) process was used for preparing an alumina-based ceramic coating with metallurgical bonding to the gray cast iron. Three different types of brake pads (ceramic, semi-metallic and non asbestos organic (NAO)) were used for tribotests. Performances of PEA coatings vs. different brake pad materials were comparatively investigated with respect to their coefficients of friction (COFs) and wear. The PEA-coated brake rotor has a dimple-like surface which promotes the formation of a thin transferred film to protect the rotor from wear. The transferred film materials come from the wear debris of the pads. The secondary plateaus are regenerated on the brake pads through compacting wear debris of the pads.
Technical Paper

Enclosure-In-Chamber Setup to Achieve Near-Zero Background Concentrations for Brake Emissions Testing

2020-10-05
2020-01-1634
Measuring brake emission is still a challenging non-standardized task. Extensive research is ongoing. Updates of work in progress are presented at SAE Brake Colloquium and PMP meetings. However, open items include how to achieve lower background concentration and how to design the brake enclosure. A low background concentration is essential as brake events are short and some emit in the range of reported background levels. Hence these emissions are difficult to distinguished from the background level. Even more critical, a high background concentration can result in a wrong particle number emissions value, either overestimated, background counted as emissions, or underestimated, background level subtracted, and low emission events no longer detected and counted. However, reducing the background level to less than 100 #/cm³ appeared to be quite challenging.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Setup for Investigations on the Boundary Layer Dynamics

2020-10-05
2020-01-1617
The frictional behavior of a tribological contact is influenced by the dynamics in the forming boundary layer. Recurring structures, built up through self-organizing effects, were found in various frictional systems. To investigate those phenomena on a macroscopic scale and to better understand dynamical processes such as the formation and decay of contact patches, the first revision of the Wear Debris Investigator (WDI) was introduced in 2017. A friction gap is formed between two coaxial horizontally arranged discs. To mimic the presence of particles, artificial wear dust is fed into the gap. With a camera the formation of the boundary layer is recorded in situ. An implemented normal force and torque sensor enables to recognize correlations between the formed boundary layer and the occurring frictional forces. Numerous measurements revealed an insufficient precision of the previous WDI.
Technical Paper

A Study of the Interactions Between Phenolic Resin and Metal Sulphides and their Contribution to PAD Performance and Wear

2020-10-05
2020-01-1600
In order to keep the coefficient of friction stable, some additives such as metal sulphides, are included in the brake pads formulation. Previous work from RIMSA has shown that oxidation temperature range of the metal sulphides can be one of the key properties to explain their contribution to the performance and wear of a PAD. This new work is a step forward in the interpretation of the mechanism of sulphides as chemically active additives in the brake pads. Phenolic resin is the matrix of the brake pads and starts to decompose around 300 ºC in presence of oxygen and temperature. In order to establish a connection on between sulphide oxidation and phenolic resin degradation, several studies based on heat treatment of blends of different metal sulphides (Iron sulphide, Tin sulphide and Composite sulphide) with phenolic resin have been done. Then the material evolution was studied with techniques such as TGA - DSC, XRD, IR and SEM - EDS.
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