Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Event

Exhibit/Sponsor - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Request Info - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Event

Registration - Attend - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Registration - Attend - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Event

Hotel/Travel - Attend - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Hotel & Travel - Attend - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Event

Promotional Toolkit - Attend - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Promotional Toolkit - Attend - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Event

Technical Sessions - Program - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Technical Sessions - Program - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Event

Exhibit/Sponsor - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Exhibit/Sponsor - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Event

Exhibit/Sponsor - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium - Sponsor - Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium

2020-10-28
Innovative and enquiring specialists gather together 2020 SAE International Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Symposium (HDD) expand their knowledge collaborate most promising new technologies: emission control strategies, in-service maintenance, retro-fitting exhaust after-treatment equipment, global harmonization emission standards, regulatory activities
Journal Article

On the Ignition Delay of Jojoba Bio-Gasoline Blended with Basic Gasoline as an Octane Booster

2020-09-17
Abstract Synthesizing a higher antiknock quality fuel is required to increase the thermal efficiency of spark-ignition engines. Since the octane number (ON) of pure Jojoba Bio-Gasoline (JBG) is significantly in excess of one hundred, it can thus be used as an octane booster. In this work, the influence of blending different percentages of JBG with petroleum gasoline (octane number 80) on the ON was investigated. Then the results of such investigation were employed to produce new gasolines with ONs of 92, 95, and 98. The ignition delays of such new gasolines were measured and compared with those of basic gasolines. In order to perform the experiments, a shock tube was designed, manufactured, and fully instrumented for ignition delay measurements. The test variables included the type of fuel, equivalence ratio (Φ), ignition temperature (Tig), and ignition pressure (Pig).
Technical Paper

Study of Effects of Deposit Formation on GDi Injector and Engine Performance

2020-09-15
2020-01-2099
Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) vehicles now make up the majority of European new car sales and a significant share of the existing car parc. Despite delivering measurable engine efficiency benefits, GDI fuel systems are not without issues. Fuel injectors are susceptible to the formation of deposits in and around the injector nozzles holes. It is widely reported that these deposits can affect engine performance and that different fuels can alleviate the buildup of those deposits. This project aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of how deposit formation ultimately leads to a reduction in vehicle performance. Ten GDI fuel injectors, with differing levels of coking were taken from engine testing and consumer vehicles and compared using a range of imaging and engine tests. At the time of writing, a new GDI engine test is being developed by the Co-ordinating European Council (CEC) to be used by the fuel and fuel additive industry.
Technical Paper

CO2 Emissions Reduction through a New Multi-Functional Fluid for Simultaneous NOx and Particles Abatement

2020-09-15
2020-01-2170
Since the Euro VI/6 regulation came into force in 2013/2014, most of the Diesel applications are equipped with both selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems and Diesel particulate filters (DPF). On the one hand, SCR requires ammonia for the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) created during the combustion process. An aqueous urea solution (AUS) containing 32.5% wt. urea, such as AdBlue® is injected into the hot exhaust gas upstream of the SCR catalyst to produce ammonia for NOx reduction. On the other hand, DPF demonstrates very high particle filtration efficiency, but requires to be periodically regenerated at high temperature to burn off accumulated soot. The regeneration temperature and duration can be significantly lowered by using fuel additives (fuel-borne catalyst or FBC) or by washcoating a catalyst into the DPF (catalyzed DPF or cDPF).
Technical Paper

Sludge and Varnish Evaluation of Polyether Amine Gasoline Fuel Additives at “Complete Fuel System Cleaner” Aftermarket Fuel Additive Concentrations

2020-09-15
2020-01-2100
Sludge and Varnish deposits that can build up in the crankcase originate in large part from fuel and fuel components that enter the crankcase through blow-by. These deposits can lead to a variety of engine issues including piston skirt deposits, cylinder bore scuffing, stuck lifters and oil filter plugging. A test has been developed to evaluate the contribution of “Complete Fuel System Cleaner” (CFSC) aftermarket fuel additives to crankcase sludge and varnish deposit formation. CFSC aftermarket fuel additives are typically formulated with polyether amine (PEA) chemistry and at concentrations that exceed 2000ppm. Three different commercially-available CFSC products were tested, containing two different classes of PEA chemistry - propylene oxide-based PEA (“PO-PEA”) and butylene oxide-based PEA (“BO-PEA”). Two of the three products contained the same PO-PEA chemistry, but at different concentrations, to show the effect of additive dosage.
Technical Paper

Investigations of Diesel Injector Deposits Characterization and Testing

2020-09-15
2020-01-2094
Over the last decade, there has been an impetus in the automobile industry to develop new diesel injector systems, driven by a desire to reduce fuel consumption and proscribed by the requirement to fulfil legislation emissions. The modern common-rail diesel injector system has been developed by the industry to fulfil these aspirations, designed with ever-higher tolerances and pressures, which have led to concomitant increases in fuel temperatures after compression with reports of fuel temperatures of ~150°C at 1500-2500 bar. This engineering solution in combination with the introduction of Ultra Low Sulphur diesel fuel (ULSD) has been found to be highly sensitive to deposit formation both external injector deposits (EDID) and internal (IDID). The deposits have caused concerns for customers with poor spray patterns misfiring injector malfunction and failure, producing increased fuel consumption and emissions.
Technical Paper

The Combustion Characteristic of Fuel Additives with Diesel–Ethanol Fuel blends on Engine Performance

2020-01-24
2019-32-0611
Reducing carbon dioxide (greenhouse gas) is one of the most important drivers to promote biofuels. Fuel from biomass has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can gradually reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. However, fuel properties can differ significantly from standard diesel fuel and this will affect exhaust emissions and environmental pollution. Diesel – ethanol fuel blends development and specification are currently driven by the engine technology, existing fossil fuel specification and availability of feedstock. Thus, the aims of this study to investigate the effects of fuel additives with diesel–ethanol fuel blend under steady-state conditions. In the present study, the additives were palm diesel, n-butanol, ethyl acetate and di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP). The ratio of conventional diesel fuel to ethanol fuel to fuel additive are 80:15:5 by volume of fuel blends.
Technical Paper

Development of Refinery Additive Response Models to Optimise Fuel Production for New Internal Combustion Engine Technology

2019-12-19
2019-01-2191
There is increasing pressure to reduce well-to-wheel CO2 emissions in the internal combustion engine (ICE). This will require improvements in engine technology. An important aspect will include identification of the right fuel to match the new ICE’s requirements. It will likely require fuel production to move away from current production types. This is an additional optimisation that refineries will have to consider along with the other factors they balance to remain profitable. The use of additives is a key enabler to ensure that the fuels produced are fit-for-purpose whilst increasing refinery flexibility and hence profitability. However, for fuels, such as diesel, it has proved difficult to understand the variability of additive response with changes in fuel composition. This is particularly true for the cold flow response where subtle differences in fuels can impact additive appetite.
Technical Paper

An Efficient, High-Precision Vehicle Testing Procedure to Evaluate the Efficacy of Fuel-Borne Friction Modifier Additives

2019-12-19
2019-01-2353
Improved fuel economy is increasingly a key measure of performance in the automotive industry driven by market demands and tighter emissions regulations. Within this environment, one way to improve fuel economy is via fuel additives that deliver friction- reducing components to the piston-cylinder wall interface. Whilst the use of friction modifiers (FMs) in fuel or lubricant additives to achieve fuel economy improvements is not new, demonstrating the efficacy of these FMs in vehicles is challenging and requires statistical design together with carefully controlled test conditions. This paper describes a bespoke, efficient, high-precision vehicle testing procedure designed to evaluate the fuel economy credentials of fuel-borne FMs. By their nature, FMs persist on engine surfaces and so their effects are not immediately reversible upon changing to a non FM-containing fuel (“carryover” effect), therefore requiring careful design of the test programme.
X