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Technical Paper

COMPOSITE FUELS

1920-01-01
200012
The progressive decrease in the volatility of gasoline due to the insufficiency of the high-volatility supply has developed a problem of efficient utilization of internal-combustion-engine fuel that requires coordination between the engine and its fuel and a technical as well as economic adjustment between supply and demand. The three channels through which this adjustment tends toward accomplishment are stated and commented upon, consideration then passing to the three main resources from which the components of composite fuels can be drawn.
Technical Paper

TENDENCIES IN ENGINE DESIGN

1920-01-01
200013
War service demanded that gasoline engines be absolutely reliable in minor as well as major details of construction; lightness of construction was second in importance. The war scope of the gasoline engine was so wide that engineers were forced toward the solution of unexpected and unrealized problems and a vast amount of valuable data resulted. This information includes recent determination of the quantitative nature of the factors governing thermodynamic performance in respect to mean effective pressure, compression ratio and the effect of volumetric efficiency; mechanical performance in regard to mechanical efficiency and internal friction; and engine balancing.
Technical Paper

STEAM AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEM

1920-01-01
200014
It is stated that the general performance of the steam-propelled automobile has never been equalled by that of the most highly-developed multiple-cylinder gasoline cars and that it is significant that no innovation in the gasoline car has yet been able to give steam-car performance. This led to an effort to remove the troublesome features of the steam car, rather than to complicate the gasoline car further by attempting to make it duplicate steam-car performance. The paper describes in detail the steam automotive system developed by the author and E. C. Newcomb, including the boiler, the combustion system and its control, the engine and the condensing system.
Technical Paper

SUPERCHARGERS AND SUPERCHARGING ENGINES

1920-01-01
200007
If at great altitudes air is supplied to the carbureter of an engine at sea-level pressure, the power developed becomes approximately the same as when the engine is running at sea level. The low atmospheric pressure and density at great altitudes offer greatly reduced resistance to high airplane speeds; hence the same power that will drive a plane at a given speed at sea level will drive it much faster at great altitudes and with approximately the same consumption of fuel per horsepower-hour. Supercharging means forcing in a charge of greater volume than that normally drawn into the cylinders by the suction of the pistons. Superchargers usually take the form of a mechanical blower or pump and the various forms of supercharger are mentioned and commented upon. Questions regarding the best location for the carbureter in supercharged engines are then considered.
Technical Paper

DILUTION OF ENGINE LUBRICANTS BY FUEL

1920-01-01
200008
Engine lubrication troubles resulting from the dilution of the lubricating oil in engine crankcases appear with increasing frequency, particularly where economy demands the use of cheap grades of fuel. Unless a lubricant not miscible with present engine fuels can be produced, lubricants will steadily decrease in viscosity whenever fuel finds its way into them. The most satisfactory remedy is to prevent dilution of the oil. To prevent absorption of the fuel by the oil is a problem of engine design. In experiments made by the Bureau of Standards the absorption of fuel vapors at average engine temperatures was found to be negligible; further experiments and oil tests showed no indication of dilution due to cracking, with representative refiners' products from typical crude oils available in this country.
Technical Paper

THE MEASUREMENT OF VEHICLE VIBRATIONS

1920-01-01
200009
The five fundamental criteria of the performance of a motor vehicle as a whole are stated. Riding comfort is investigated at length with a view to determining methods of measurement of the two classes of vehicle vibrations that affect the riding qualities of a car, so that suitable springs can be designed to overcome them. The underlying principles of the seismograph are utilized in designing a specialized form of this instrument for measuring vehicle vibrations, the general design considerations are stated and a detailed description is given. This is followed by an explanation of the methods used in analyzing the curves obtained, thus making possible a standardized measurement of riding comfort. The factors determining riding comfort are then analyzed in connection with spring-development work, the most important are summarized and the preliminary experimental results of those directly determined by the seismograph are outlined.
Technical Paper

THE VELOCITY OF FLAME PROPAGATION IN ENGINE CYLINDERS

1920-01-01
200010
Flame propagation has received much attention, but few results directly applicable to operating conditions have been obtained. The paper describes a method devised for measuring the rate of flame propagation in gaseous mixtures and some experiments made to coordinate the phenomena with the important factors entering into engine operation; it depends upon the fact that bodies at a high temperature ionize the space about them, the bodies being either inert substances or burning gases. Experiments were made which showed that across a spark-gap in an atmosphere of compressed gas, as in an engine cylinder, a potential difference can be maintained which is just below the breakdown potential in the compressed gas before ignition but which is sufficient to arc the gap after ignition has taken place and the flame has supplied ionization. These experiments and the recording of the results photographically are described.
Technical Paper

SPRINGS AND SPRING SUSPENSIONS

1920-01-01
200004
The chief factors affecting the riding quality of a motor vehicle are spring deflection, or amplitude; periodicity, or the number of vibrations per second; and the proportion of the sprung to the unsprung weight. Other factors are the wheelbase, the tread, the height of the center of gravity of the car and the effect of the front springs on the rear ones. The three main factors are considered at some length, various experiments being described and illustrated by diagrams. Spring inertia and the fundamentals of periodicity are then investigated, by experiments and mathematical analyses, in considerable detail.
Technical Paper

AUTOMOBILE BODY DESIGN

1920-01-01
200003
The author first considers the style and arrangement of the seats, the position of the rear axle as affecting the rear kick-up in the chassis frame, and the position of the rear wheels as determining the distance from the back of the front seat to a point where the curve of the rear fender cuts across the top edge of the chassis frame. The location of the driver's seat and of the steering-wheel are next considered, the discussion then passing to the requirements that affect the height of the body, the width of the rear seat, and the general shape. The evolution of the windshield is reviewed and present practice stated. Structural changes are then considered in relation to the artistic requirements, as regards the various effects obtained by varying the size or location of such details as windows, doors, moldings, panels, pillars, belt lines, etc., and the general lines necessary to produce an effect in keeping with the character of the car.
Technical Paper

ALUMINUM PISTON DESIGN

1920-01-01
200006
The two broad divisions of aluminum pistons from a thermal standpoint are those designed to conduct the heat from the head into the skirt and thence into the cylinder walls, and those designed to partly insulate the skirt from the heat of the piston head. Pistons of the first type seem logical for heavy-duty engines; those of the second type are better suited for passenger-car engines. The objections of wear, piston slap, excessive oil consumption and crankcase dilution are stated as being the same for aluminum as for cast-iron pistons; and these statements are amplified. Piston slap is next considered and, as this can be overcome by using proper clearance, pistons of the second design tend to make this condition easier to meet. Many tests show that when too much oil is thrown into the cylinder bores, tight-fitting pistons and special rings will not completely overcome excessive oil consumption.
Technical Paper

BETTERING THE EFFICIENCY OF EXISTING ENGINES

1920-01-01
200005
First reviewing the history of the progressive insufficiency of the supply of highly volatile internal-combustion engine fuels and the early efforts made to overcome this by applying heat to produce rapid vaporization, the author gives an outline of the methods already found valuable in offsetting the rising boiling points of engine fuels and states the resulting three-fold problem now confronting the automotive industry. The tendency to subordinate efficient vaporization to the attainment of maximum volumetric efficiency is criticised at some length and the volatility of fuel is discussed in detail, with reference to characteristic distillation, time of evaporation and distillation-temperature curves which are analyzed. Heating devices are then divided into four classes and described, consideration then being given to fuel losses outside the engine.
Technical Paper

MIXTURE REQUIREMENTS OF AUTOMOBILE ENGINES

1920-01-01
200002
The paper is based upon the results of tests made by the Purdue Engineering Experiment Station to study the effect upon engine performance of varying the proportions of fuel to air in the mixture, and its object is to determine the variation in the mixture requirements of an engine at different rates of flow of air through the carbureter. The method of conducting the tests is described. The results are plotted in the charts shown and are discussed in some detail, special discussion regarding the effect of speed and load being presented, and the facts brought out by the tests are summarized. In the general discussion that follows, four definite conclusions regarding the richness of the fuel mixture in its relation to the maximum power are stated, and a like number of definite conclusions concerning the richness of the mixture in relation to maximum efficiency are also given.
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