Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

COMMERCIAL MOTORBOATS AND THE DIESEL ENGINE

1921-01-01
210034
It is stated that, in the commercial motor boat field, the boat owner must choose between the various types of internal-combustion engine, broadly speaking there being three forms of such engines available today in small and moderate sizes; (a) the gas engine, (b) the surface-ignition or hot-bulb engine and (c) the Diesel engine. Charts are presented which show certain approximate costs of operation of the three types for various sizes of engine. Fuel and lubricant economy are discussed in connection with the question of the choice between a Diesel and a hot-bulb engine and, in regard to mechanical operation, it is stated that there is little choice between any of the three types under discussion, since all are reliable. For sizes of 100 b. hp. and less, some form of hot-bulb or surface-ignition engine has the field to itself, but for sizes above 100 hp. the Diesel engine shows its superiority.
Technical Paper

FARM-POWER MEETING PAPERS - THE CARBURETION OF ALCOHOL

1921-01-01
210032
The author describes the development of an alcohol-burning tractor engine, after having stated a few of the fundamental requirements for burning alcohol economically and the results that can be attained by following them. The first trials were with 127-lb. gage compression at a normal operating speed. The problems attacked were those of what amount of heat applied to the mixture is desirable and its general effect on economy, output and operation; power output; general operation of the engine; and fuel consumption. The experimental work was done on a 4¼ x 6-in. four-cylinder 16-valve engine; this is described in detail and the results are presented in chart form. The conditions necessary for the proper use of alcohol as a fuel are discussed.
Technical Paper

WIRE WHEELS

1920-01-01
200067
The early wheels merely rolled, carried weight and resisted side strains; later they were called upon to transmit braking forces and still later the driving force. Prior to the automobile, wire wheels were not called upon to support much weight and the usual type was that used for bicycles. When automobiles were first built, bicycle-type wire-wheels were employed and used until the demand for larger wheels presented unsurmountable obstacles. From that time a development was in progress in this country and in England that resulted in the triple-spoke wire-wheel which has grown in popularity since 1912. The different types of wheels are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of wire wheels stated; three diagrams are shown. As the wire wheel is a “suspension” wheel, the car weight is hung or “cradled” from scores of resilient, flexible spokes, and the pull is always on three-quarters of the spokes.
Technical Paper

TORSIONAL VIBRATION AND CRITICAL SPEED IN CRANKSHAFTS

1920-01-01
200070
It has long been recognized that, in automotive engines, particularly those of six or more cylinders, excessive vibration is apt to occur despite all precautions taken in balancing; and that this is because the engine impulses coincide at certain speeds with the torsional period of the crankshaft, or rate at which it naturally twists and untwists about some point or points as nodes. Very serious vibration occurred in the main engines for the United States submarines S 4 to S 9, which are required to complete five specified non-stop shop tests and an investigation was made of which the author reports the findings in detail, illustrated with photographs and charts.
Technical Paper

PNEUMATIC-TIRE AND MOTOR-TRUCK DEVELOPMENT EXPERIENCES

1920-01-01
200066
These experiences relate to the Akron-Boston motor-truck express, established in April, 1917, the Wingfoot Highway Express between Akron and Cleveland which began active operations in January, 1919, and the Goodyear Heights motor omnibuses for passenger service in Akron inaugurated in December, 1917. The preliminary difficulties are reviewed and a mass of specific data regarding construction, operation, maintenance and costs is presented in textual and tabular form, the latter including a summary of pneumatic-tire accomplishment, comparative truck efficiency, an operating summary for six months, the operating cost and efficiency of two 3½-ton twin trucks running on pneumatic and on solid tires respectively, and an operative summary of the Goodyear Heights buses.
Technical Paper

SINGLE-DISC METAL WHEELS

1920-01-01
200065
Although disc wheels have not been produced in such great quantities as some of the other types, they have advanced far enough in practical application to demonstrate their possibilities and fundamental correctness. Distinction should be made between the wheel itself, the single-taper dished disc and other features such as tire, rim and hub applications. Single-taper dished-disc wheels were developed in France and in this country at about the same time but, on account of the variation in European and American tire practice, the resultant wheels took different forms. The author describes these forms and comments upon them, the argument being favorable to the single-taper disc, and the statement is made that, given the data as to the service expected, the weight and power of the car, the single-disc wheel will compare favorably with any other type, since, when properly designed, the strains are diffused over the entire surface.
Technical Paper

BATTERY-IGNITION SYSTEM

1920-01-01
200063
A brief outline of the elementary principles of the operation of jump-spark ignition systems is given preliminarily to the discussion of the advantages of battery-type systems, and four vital elements in a jump-spark ignition system are stated. A diagram is shown and explained of an hydraulic analogy, followed by a discussion of oscillating voltage and oscillograms of what occurs in the primary circuit of an ignition system when the secondary is disconnected. The subjects of spark-plug gaps and current values receive considerable attention and similar treatment is accorded magneto speeds and spark polarity, numerous oscillograms accompanying the text. The effects of magneto and of battery ignition on engine power are stated and commented upon and this is followed by a lengthy comparison of battery and magneto ignition, illustrated with charts.
X