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Technical Paper

Implementing Mixed Criticality Software Integration on Multicore - A Cost Model and the Lessons Learned

2015-04-14
2015-01-0266
The German funded project ARAMiS included work on several demonstrators one of which was a multicore approach on large scale software integration (LSSI) for the automotive domain. Here BMW and Audi intentionally implemented two different integration platforms to gain both experience and real life data on a Hypervisor based concept on one side as well as using only native AUTOSAR-based methods on the other side for later comparison. The idea was to obtain figures on the added overhead both for multicore as well as safety, based on practical work and close-to-production implementations. During implementation and evaluation on one hand there were a lot of valuable lessons learned about multicore in conjunction with safety. On the other hand valuable information was gathered to make it finally possible to set up a cost model for estimation of potential overhead generated by different integration approaches for safety related software functions.
Technical Paper

Evolution of Passenger Car Emission in Germany - A Comparative Assessment of Two Forecast Models

1993-11-01
931988
Two models for the forecast of road traffic emissions, independently developed in parallel, are comparatively presented and assessed: EPROG developed by BMW and enlarged by VDA for a national application (Germany) and FOREMOVE, developed for application on European Community scale. The analysis of the methodological character of the two algorithms proves that the models are fundamentally similar with regard to the basic calculation schemes used for the emissions. The same holds true as far as the significant dependencies of the emission factors, and the recognition and incorporation of the fundamental framework referring to traffic important parameters (speeds, mileage and mileage distribution etc) are concerned.
Technical Paper

Performance Modelling of Automotive Multiplex Systems

1994-03-01
940134
The increasing number of local control units in automotive systems led to growing emphasis on developing and using multiplex systems. For reasons of price and robustness the use of asynchronous and slow multiplex systems is preferred. Since the communication volume now reaches critical dimensions in peak load situations during the use of those systems, new concepts on different communication levels have to be developed. Due to the use of many different message types (wide range of message length) and the statistical dependence of the communication behaviour of control units (e.g. question-answer-combinations), the application of standard methodologies is only partly suitable for a performance analysis of automotive multiplex systems.
Technical Paper

Generation of Realistic Communication Scenarios for the Simulation of Automotive Multiplex Systems

1995-02-01
950294
The increasing complexity of communication protocols for asynchronous multiplex systems requires the use of simulation during the optimisation of these protocols or the integration of other control units. Consideration of realistic communication behaviour of the connected control units is essential for performance analysis of multiplex systems. For a first pass, the use of simple statistical distributions (e.g. Poisson distribution) is suitable to get some simulation results. A better way to get realistic results is the approximation of empirical communication data through the use of more complex statistical distribution (e.g. mixed Erlang distributions). In this paper several approaches for the approximation of empirical data are presented. Beside simple statistical distributions (with one parameter), the use of more complex statistical distributions is discussed and methods for the identification of their parameters are presented.
Journal Article

Bridging the Gap between Open Loop Tests and Statistical Validation for Highly Automated Driving

2017-03-28
2017-01-1403
Highly automated driving (HAD) is under rapid development and will be available for customers within the next years. However the evidence that HAD is at least as safe as human driving has still not been produced. The challenge is to drive hundreds of millions of test kilometers without incidents to show that statistically HAD is significantly safer. One approach is to let a HAD function run in parallel with human drivers in customer cars to utilize a fraction of the billions of kilometers driven every year. To guarantee safety, the function under test (FUT) has access to sensors but its output is not executed, which results in an open loop problem. To overcome this shortcoming, the proposed method consists of four steps to close the loop for the FUT. First, sensor data from real driving scenarios is fused in a world model and enhanced by incorporating future time steps into original measurements.
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