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Technical Paper

Reduction of CO2 Emissions through Lubricant Thermal Management During the Warm Up of Passenger Car Engines

2016-04-05
2016-01-0892
Most major regional automotive markets have stringent legislative targets for vehicle greenhouse gas emissions or fuel economy enforced by fiscal penalties. Large improvements in vehicle efficiency on mandated test cycles have already taken place in some markets through the widespread adoption of technologies such as downsizing or dieselisation. There is now increased focus on approaches which give smaller, but significant incremental efficiency benefits, such as reducing parasitic losses due to engine friction. The reduction in tail pipe CO2 emissions through the reduction of engine friction using lubricants has been reported by many authors. However, opportunities also exist to reduce the lubricant viscosity during warm up by the thermal management of the lubricant mass.
Technical Paper

CO2 Emission Reduction Synergies of Advanced Engine Design and Fuel Octane Number

2014-10-13
2014-01-2610
Engine downsizing is a key approach employed by many vehicle manufacturers to help meet fleet average CO2 emissions targets. With gasoline engines in particular reducing engine swept volume while increasing specific output via technologies such as turbocharging, direct injection (DI) and variable valve timing can significantly reduce frictional and pumping losses in engine operating areas commonly encountered in legislative drive cycles. These engines have increased susceptibility to abnormal combustion phenomena such as knock due to the high brake mean effective pressures which they generate. This ultimately limits fuel efficiency benefits by demanding use of a lower geometric compression ratio and sub-optimal late combustion phasing at the higher specific loads experienced by these engines.
Technical Paper

Tribological Behavior of Low Viscosity Lubricants in the Piston to Bore Zone of a Modern Spark Ignition Engine

2014-10-13
2014-01-2859
Most major regional automotive markets have stringent legislative targets for vehicle greenhouse gas emissions or fuel economy enforced by fiscal penalties. Large improvements in vehicle efficiency on mandated test cycles have already taken place in some markets through the widespread adoption of technologies such as downsizing or dieselization. There is now increased focus on approaches which give smaller but significant incremental efficiency benefits such as reducing parasitic losses due to engine friction. Fuel economy improvements which achieve this through the development of advanced engine lubricants are very attractive to vehicle manufacturers due to their favorable cost-benefit ratio. For an engine with components which operate predominantly in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime, the most significant lubricant parameter which can be changed to improve the tribological performance of the system is the lubricant viscosity.
Technical Paper

Visual Analyses of End of Injection Liquid Structures and the Behaviour of Nozzle Surface-Bound Fuel in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine

2019-01-15
2019-01-0059
For efficiency, the majority of modern diesel engines implement multiple injection strategies, increasing the frequency of transient injection phases and thus, end of injection (EOI) events. Recent advances in diagnostic techniques have identified several EOI phenomena pertinent to nozzle surface wetting as a precursor for deposit formation and a potential contributor towards pollutant emissions. To investigate the underlying processes, highspeed optical measurements at the microscopic scale were performed inside a motored diesel engine under low load/idling conditions. Visualisation of the injector nozzle surface and near nozzle region permitted an indepth analysis of the post-injection phenomena and the behaviour of fuel films on the nozzle surface when the engine is not fired. Inspection of the high-speed video data enabled an interpretation of the fluid dynamics leading to surface wetting, elucidating the mechanisms of deposition and spreading.
Technical Paper

Simulation and Measurement of Transient Fluid Phenomena within Diesel Injection

2019-01-15
2019-01-0066
Rail pressures of modern diesel fuel injection systems have increased significantly over recent years, greatly improving atomisation of the main fuel injection event and air utilisation of the combustion process. Continued improvement in controlling the process of introducing fuel into the cylinder has led to focussing on fluid phenomena related to transient response. High-speed microscopy has been employed to visualise the detailed fluid dynamics around the near nozzle region of an automotive diesel fuel injector, during the opening, closing and post injection events. Complementary computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations have been undertaken to elucidate the interaction of the liquid and gas phases during these highly transient events, including an assessment of close-coupled injections.
Technical Paper

Fast NGC: A New On-Line Technique for Fuel Flow Measurement

2019-01-15
2019-01-0062
Knowledge of fuel mass injected in an individual cycle is important for engine performance and modelling. Currently direct measurements of fuel flow to individual cylinders of an engine are not possible on-engine or in real-time due to a lack of available appropriate measurement techniques. The objective of this work was to undertake real-time Coriolis fuel flow measurement using GDI injectors on a rig observing fuel mass flow rate within individual fuel injections. This paper evaluates the potential of this technology - combining Coriolis Flow Meters (CFMs) with Prism signal processing together known as Fast Next Generation Coriolis (Fast NGC), and serves as a basis for future transitions on-engine applications. A rig-based feasibility study has been undertaken injecting gasoline through a GDI injector at 150 bar in both single shot mode and at a simulated engine speeds of 1788 and 2978 rpm. The results show that these injections can, in principle, be observed.
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