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Technical Paper

The Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Soot Formation in a High-Speed Direct-injection Diesel Engine

1996-02-01
960841
A number of tests were conducted on a 2.5 litre, high-speed, direct-injection diesel engine running at various loads and speeds. The aim of the tests was to gain understanding which would lead to more effective use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for controlling exhaust NOx whilst minimising the penalties of increased smoke emission and fuel consumption. In addition to exhaust emission measurements, in-cylinder sampling of combustion gases was carried out using a fast-acting, snatch-sampling valve. The results showed that the effectiveness of EGR was enhanced considerably by cooling the EGR. In addition to more effective NOx control, this measure also improved volumetric efficiency which assisted in the control of smoke emission and fuel consumption. This second of two papers on the use of EGR in diesel engines deals with the effects of EGR on soot emission and on the engine fuel economy.
Technical Paper

The Effect on Engine Performance and NO Emissions of a Two-Stage Expansion Cycle in a Spark Ignition Engine

1997-10-01
972991
This paper presents the development of an engine simulation program for SI engines and its application to a two-stage expansion cycle. The two-stage expansion analysis is performed using the engine simulation, where a sudden expansion much faster than the normal expansion takes place during the expansion stroke. The changes in NO emissions and knock tolerance of the resulting new engine cycle are investigated for the same compression ratio. The changes in NO emissions and specific fuel consumption through increasing the compression ratio in order to return to the same amount of work done within the cycle are also studied.
Technical Paper

Review of Induction System Design and a Comparison Between Prediction and Results from a Single Cylinder Diesel Engine

1992-09-01
921727
Induction tuning is now used on a wide range of spark ignition and diesel engines. It has also been the subject of research and publications over many years. The literature on induction tuning is reviewed here, and contradictions are identified and clarified. The use of resonator volume systems are also discussed and the various ways of modelling these systems are compared. In order to reconcile the differing theories, and to attempt to clarify the means by which induction tuning occurs, experiments have been undertaken with a single cylinder diesel engine. This was chosen as a single cylinder engine represents the simplest system, and a diesel engine does not have fuel in the induction system (which would otherwise modify the thermodynamic properties. The experimental measurements include the instantaneous air mass flow rate entering the induction system, and the pressure at the inlet port.
Technical Paper

Continuous Load Adjustment Strategy of a Gasoline HCCI-SI Engine Fully Controlled by Exhaust Gas

2011-04-12
2011-01-1408
Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) technology is promising to reduce engine exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. However, it is still confronted with the problem of its narrow operation range that covers only the light and medium loads. Therefore, to expand the operation range of HCCI, mode switching between HCCI combustion and transition SI combustion is necessary, which may bring additional problems to be resolved, including load fluctuation and increasing the complexity of control strategy, etc. In this paper, a continuously adjustable load strategy is proposed for gasoline engines. With the application of the strategy, engine load can be adjusted continuously by the in-cylinder residual gas fraction in the whole operation range. In this research, hybrid combustion is employed to bridge the gaps between HCCI and traditional SI and thus realize smooth transition between different load points.
Technical Paper

Combustion Characteristics of CAI Combustion with Alcohol Fuels

2010-04-12
2010-01-0843
Due to its potential for simultaneous improvement in fuel consumption and exhaust emissions, controlled autoignition (CAI) combustion has been subject to continuous research in the last several years. At the same time, there has been a lot of interest in the use of alternative fuels in order to reduce reliance on conventional fossil fuels. Therefore, this experimental study has been carried out to investigate the effect of alcohol fuels on the CAI combustion process and on the resulting engine performance. The experimental work was conducted on an optical single cylinder engine with an air-assisted injector. To achieve controlled autoignition, residual gas was trapped in the cylinder by using negative valve overlap and an intake air heater was used to ensure stable CAI combustion in the optical engine. Methanol, ethanol and blended fuels were tested and compared with the results of gasoline.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Cylinder Deactivation and Variable Valve Actuation on Gasoline Engine Performance

2014-04-01
2014-01-1170
Increasingly stringent regulations on gasoline engine fuel consumption and exhaust emissions require additional technology integration such as Cylinder Deactivation (CDA) and Variable valve actuation (VVA) to improve part load engine efficiency. At part load, CDA is achieved by closing the inlet and exhaust valves and shutting off the fuel supply to a selected number of cylinders. Variable valve actuation (VVA) enables the cylinder gas exchange process to be optimised for different engine speeds by changing valve opening and closing times as well as maximum valve lift. The focus of this study was the investigation of effect of the integration of the above two technologies on the performance of a gasoline engine operating at part load conditions. In this study, a 1.6 Litre in-line 4-cylinder gasoline engine is modelled on engine simulation software and simulated data is analysed to show improvements in fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, pumping losses and effects on CO and NOx emissions.
Technical Paper

Effects of Ethanol on Performance and Exhaust Emissions from a DI Spark Ignition Engine with Throttled and Unthrottled Operations

2014-04-01
2014-01-1393
In recent years, in order to develop more efficient and cleaner gasoline engines, a number of new engine operating strategies have been proposed and many have been studied on different engines but there is a lack of comparison between various operating strategies and alternative fuels at different SI modes. In this research, a single cylinder direct injection gasoline engine equipped with an electro-hydraulic valve train system has been commissioned and used to study and compare different engine operation modes. In this work, the fuel consumption, gaseous and particulate emissions of gasoline and its mixture with ethanol (E15 and E85) were measured and analysed when the engine was operated at the same load but with different load control methods by an intake throttle, reduced intake valve duration, and positive overlap.
Technical Paper

Research and Development of Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) Combustion in a 4-Stroke Multi-Cylinder Gasoline Engine

2001-09-24
2001-01-3608
Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion has been achieved in a production type 4-stroke multi-cylinder gasoline engine. The engine was based on a Ford 1.7L Zetec-SE 16V engine with a compression ratio of 10.3, using substantially standard components modified only in design dimensions to control the gas exchange process in order to significantly increase the trapped residuals. The engine was also equipped with Variable Cam Timing (VCT) on both the intake and exhaust camshafts. It was found that the largely increased trapped residuals alone were sufficient to achieve CAI in this engine and with VCT, a range of loads between 0.5 and 4 bar BMEP and engine speeds between 1000 and 3500 rpm were mapped for CAI fuel consumption and exhaust emissions. The measured CAI results were compared with those of Spark Ignition (SI) combustion in the same engine but with standard camshafts at the same speeds and loads.
Technical Paper

Performance and Analysis of a 4-Stroke Multi-Cylinder Gasoline Engine with CAI Combustion

2002-03-04
2002-01-0420
Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion was realised in a production type 4-stroke 4-cylinder gasoline engine without intake charge heating or increasing compression ratio. The CAI engine operation was achieved using substantially standard components modified only in camshafts to restrict the gas exchange process The engine could be operated with CAI combustion within a range of load (0.5 to 4 bar BMEP) and speed (1000 to 3500 rpm). Significant reductions in both specific fuel consumption and CO emissions were found. The reduction in NOx emission was more than 93% across the whole CAI range. Though unburned hydrocarbons were higher under the CAI engine operation. In order to evaluate the potential of the CAI combustion technology, the European NEDC driving cycle vehicle simulation was carried out for two identical vehicles powered by a SI engine and a CAI/SI hybrid engine, respectively.
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