Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Search Results

Journal Article

The Influence of Diesel End-of-Injection Rate Shape on Combustion Recession

2015-04-14
2015-01-0795
The effect of the shape of the EOI was investigated through a pressure-modulated injection system in order to improve the understanding of the last portion of the traditional diesel diffusion combustion process. Here, the combustion recession at EOI is when the combustion of a mixing controlled diesel jet recedes backwards toward the fuel injector nozzle orifice. Combustion recession was observed using combustion luminosity imaging filtered at 309 nm to capture OH* chemiluminescence and 430 nm to capture CH* chemiluminescence, although soot Natural Luminosity (NL) will also be visible in these measurements. Experimental spray vessel results show that for relatively slow EOI decelerations below 1 ×106 to 2 ×106 m/s2, combustion strongly recesses completely back to the nozzle in both OH* and CH*/NL imaging. 1-D jet mixing calculations add support that this strong recession is indeed fuel rich.
Technical Paper

A New Parallel Cut-Cell Cartesian CFD Code for Rapid Grid Generation Applied to In-Cylinder Diesel Engine Simulations

2007-04-16
2007-01-0159
A new Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code has been developed in order to overcome the deficiencies of traditional grid generation and mesh motion methods. The new code uses a modified cut-cell Cartesian technique that eliminates the need for the computational grid to coincide with the geometry of interest. The code also includes state-of-the-art numerical techniques and sub-models for simulating the complex physical and chemical processes that occur in engines. Features such as shared and distributed memory parallelization, a multigrid pressure solver and user-specified grid embedding allow for efficient simulations while maintaining the grid resolution necessary for accurate engine modeling. In addition, a new Adaptive Grid Embedding (AGE) technique has been developed and implemented. Sub-models for turbulence, spray injection, spray breakup, liquid drop dynamics, ignition, combustion and emissions are also included in the code.
Technical Paper

Source Identification Using an Inverse Visible Element Rayleigh Integral Approach

2007-05-15
2007-01-2180
This paper documents an inverse visible element Rayleigh integral (VERI) approach. The VERI is a fast though approximate method for predicting sound radiation that can be used in the place of the boundary element method. This paper extends the method by applying it to the inverse problem where the VERI is used to generate the acoustic transfer matrix relating the velocity on the surface to measurement points. Given measured pressures, the inverse VERI can be used to reconstruct the vibration of a radiating surface. Results from an engine cover and diesel engine indicate that the method can be used to reliably quantify the sound power and also approximate directivity.
Technical Paper

Combustion Modeling of Conventional Diesel-type and HCCI-type Diesel Combustion with Large Eddy Simulations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0958
A general combustion model, in the context of large eddy simulations, was developed to simulate the full range of combustion in conventional diesel-type and HCCI-type diesels. The combustion model consisted of a Chemkin sub-model and an Extended Flamelet Time Scale (EFTS) sub-model. Specifically, Chemkin was used to simulate auto-ignition process. In the post-ignition phase, the combustion model was switched to EFTS. In the EFTS sub-model, combustion was assumed to be a combination of two elementary combustion modes: homogeneous combustion and flamelet combustion. The combustion index acted as a weighting factor blending the contributions from these two modes. The Chemkin sub-model neglected the subgrid scale turbulence-chemistry interactions whereas the EFTS model took them into account through a presumed PDF approach. The model was used to simulate an early injection mode of a Cummins DI diesel engine and a mode of a Caterpillar DI diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Extended Oil Drain Performance Capabilities of Diesel Engine Oils

1998-10-19
982718
This paper describes the results of a comprehensive field-testing program conducted in modern low-emission heavy-duty diesel engines to evaluate the extended oil drain capabilities of several diesel engine oils of varying performance levels. The data generated in the 59-truck trial, which was conducted over a two to three year period, provide support for extension of engine oil drain intervals when a premium mineral diesel oil is used rather than a fighting-grade mineral diesel product. The field trial results also document the performance of a premium fully synthetic engine oil at four times conventional oil drain intervals. Engine inspections conducted after 500,000 test miles confirm that the extension of oil drain intervals with premium diesel engine oils has no negative impact on engine durability.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of Particulate Morphology, Microstructures, and Fractal Geometry for ael Diesel Engine-Simulating Combustor

2004-10-25
2004-01-3044
The particulate matter (PM) produced from a diesel engine-simulating combustor was characterized in its morphology, microstructure, and fractal geometry by using a unique thermophoretic sampling and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) system. These results revealed that diesel PM produced from the laboratory-scale burner showed similar morphological characteristics to the particulates produced from diesel engines. The flame air/fuel ratio and the particulate temperature history have significant influences on both particle size and fractal geometry. The primary particle sizes were measured to be 14.7 nm and 14.8 nm under stoichiometric and fuel-rich flame conditions, respectively. These primary particle sizes are smaller than those produced from diesel engines. The radii of gyration for the aggregate particles were 83.8 nm and 47.5 nm under these two flame conditions.
Technical Paper

Caterpillar Automatic Code Generation

2004-03-08
2004-01-0894
Automatic code generation from models is actively used at Caterpillar for powertrain and machine control development. This technology was needed to satisfy the industry's demands for both increased software feature content, and its added complexity, and a short turn-around time. A pilot development effort was employed initially to roll out this new technology and shape the deployment strategy. As a result of a series of successful projects involving rapid prototyping and production code generation, Caterpillar will deploy MathWorks modeling and code generation products as their department-wide production development capability. The data collected indicated a reduction of person hours by a factor of 2 to 4 depending on the project and a reduction of calendar time by a factor of greater than 2. This paper discusses the challenges, results, and lessons learned, during this pilot effort from the perspectives of both Caterpillar and The MathWorks.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Late Cycle Oxygen Enrichment on Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions

2002-03-04
2002-01-1158
A multidimensional simulation of Auxiliary Gas Injection (AGI) for late cycle oxygen enrichment was exercised to assess the merits of AGI for reducing the emissions of soot from heavy duty diesel engines while not adversely affecting the NOx emissions of the engine. Here, AGI is the controlled enhancement of mixing within the diesel engine combustion chamber by high speed jets of air or another gas. The engine simulated was a Caterpillar 3401 engine. For a particular operating condition of this engine, the simulated soot emissions of the engine were reduced by 80% while not significantly affecting the engine-out NOx emissions compared to the engine operating without AGI. The effects of AGI duration, timing, and orientation are studied to confirm the window of opportunity for realizing lower engine-out soot while not increasing engine out NOx through controlled enhancement of in-cylinder mixing.
Technical Paper

Hydrocarbon Selective Catalytic Reduction Using a Silver-Alumina Catalyst with Light Alcohols and Other Reductants

2005-04-11
2005-01-1082
Previously reported work with a full-scale ethanol-SCR system featuring a Ag-Al2O3 catalyst demonstrated that this particular system has potential to reduce NOx emissions 80-90% for engine operating conditions that allow catalyst temperatures above 340°C. A concept explored was utilization of a fuel-borne reductant, in this case ethanol “stripped” from an ethanol-diesel micro-emulsion fuel. Increased tailpipe-out emissions of hydrocarbons, acetaldehyde and ammonia were measured, but very little N2O was detected. In the current increment of work, a number of light alcohols and other hydrocarbons were used in experiments to map their performance with the same Ag-Al2O3 catalyst. These exploratory tests are aimed at identification of compounds or organic functional groups that could be candidates for fuel-borne reductants in a compression ignition fuel, or could be produced by some workable method of fuel reforming.
Technical Paper

Methane Jet Penetration in a Direct-Injection Natural Gas Engine

1998-02-01
980143
A direct-injection natural gas (DING) engine was modified for optical access to allow the use of laser diagnostic techniques to measure species concentrations and temperatures within the cylinder. The injection and mixing processes were examined using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone-seeded natural gas to obtain qualitative maps of the fuel/air ratio. Initial acetone PLIF images were acquired in a quiescent combustion chamber with the piston locked in a position corresponding to 90° BTDC. A series of single shot images acquired in 0.1 ms intervals was used to measure the progression of one of the fuel jets across the cylinder. Cylinder pressures as high as 2 MPa were used to match the in-cylinder density during injection in a firing engine. Subsequent images were acquired in a motoring engine at 600 rpm with injections starting at 30, 20, and 15° BTDC in 0.5 crank angle degree increments.
Technical Paper

Advanced Technology Fuel System for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

1997-11-17
973182
Caterpillar Fuel Systems is developing a family of next generation electronic unit injectors that provide the fundamental injection characteristics necessary for emissions and performance improvements for future direct-injection diesel engines. This paper describes the development and design of the mechanically actuated version of Caterpillar's advanced electronic unit injector fuel system to meet the engine customer driven requirements for enhanced injection characteristics with reliability and durability improvements.
Technical Paper

Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Spray Liquid Length and Flame Lift-off Length using CFD and Parallel Detailed Chemistry

2003-03-03
2003-01-1043
Recent measurements by Siebers et al. have shown that the flame of a high pressure Diesel spray stabilizes under quiescent conditions at a location downstream of the fuel injector. The effects of various ambient and injection parameters on the flame “lift-off” length have been investigated under typical Diesel conditions in a constant-volume combustion vessel. In the present study, the experiments of Siebers et al. have been modeled using a modified version of the KIVA-3V engine simulation code. Fuel injection and spray breakup are modeled using the KH-RT model that accounts for liquid surface instabilities due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor mechanisms. Combustion is simulated using Convergent Thinking's recently developed detailed transient chemistry solver (SAGE) that allows for any number of chemical species and reactions to be modeled.
Technical Paper

Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx Emissions from a 5.9 Liter Diesel Engine Using Ethanol as a Reductant

2003-10-27
2003-01-3244
NOx emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine were reduced by more than 90% and 80% utilizing a full-scale ethanol-SCR system for space velocities of 21000/h and 57000/h respectively. These results were achieved for catalyst temperatures between 360 and 400°C and for C1:NOx ratios of 4-6. The SCR process appears to rapidly convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, which subsequently slipped past the catalyst at appreciable levels at a space velocity of 57000/h. Ammonia and N2O were produced during conversion; the concentrations of each were higher for the low space velocity condition. However, the concentration of N2O did not exceed 10 ppm. In contrast to other catalyst technologies, NOx reduction appeared to be enhanced by initial catalyst aging, with the presumed mechanism being sulfate accumulation within the catalyst. A concept for utilizing ethanol (distilled from an E-diesel fuel) as the SCR reductant was demonstrated.
Technical Paper

Overview of Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects Program

2000-06-19
2000-01-1879
This paper describes the results of Phase 1 of the Diesel Emission Control - Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program. The objective of the program is to determine the impact of fuel sulfur levels on emissions control systems that could be used to lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from vehicles with diesel engines. The DECSE program has now issued four interim reports for its first phase, with conclusions about the effect of diesel sulfur level on PM and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions from the high-temperature lean-NOx catalyst, the increase of engine-out sulfate emissions with higher sulfur fuel levels, the effect of sulfur content on NOx adsorber conversion efficiencies, and the effect of fuel sulfur content on diesel oxidation catalysts, causing increased PM emissions above engine-out emissions under certain operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Effects of Air and Road Surface Temperature on Tire Pavement Noise on an ISO 10844 Surface

2001-04-30
2001-01-1598
Sound pressure level (SPL) measurements of vehicle coast-by runs of a passenger vehicle were performed across a range of temperatures. A controlled test track was used for the runs with six different sets of tires. A small but significant reduction of noise level with positive temperature increases was observed for some but not all tires. The reduction was evident in two of the tires at 53 kph and five of the tires at 80 kph. The SPL of the other tires showed little or no sensitivity to temperature. Frequency analysis of the tire noise showed that noise content above 1000 Hz is most affected by temperature change and noise in the range of 1200 to 2000 Hz is particularly sensitive to temperature changes. However, differences in SPL due to speed and tire type were much greater than that due to temperature
Technical Paper

Caterpillar Light Truck Clean Diesel Program

1999-04-27
1999-01-2243
In 1998, light trucks accounted for over 48% of new vehicle sales in the U.S. and well over half the new Light Duty vehicle fuel consumption. The Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) program seeks to introduce large numbers of advanced technology diesel engines in light-duty trucks that would improve their fuel economy (mpg) by at least 50% and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil. Incorporating diesel engines in this application represents a high-risk technical and economic challenge.
Technical Paper

A CFD Study of Losses in a Straight-Six Diesel Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0230
Using a previously validated and documented CFD methodology, this research simulated the flow field in the intake region (inlet duct, plenum, ports, valves, and cylinder) involving the four cylinders (#1, #3, #4, #6) of a straight-six IC engine. Each cylinder was studied with its intake valves set at high, medium and low valve lifts. All twelve viscous 3-D turbulent flow simulation models had high density, high quality computational grids and complete domains. Extremely fine grid density were applied for every simulation up to 1,000,000 finite volume cells. Results for all the cases presented here were declared “fully converged” and “grid independent”. The relative magnitude of total pressure losses in the entire intake region and loss mechanisms were documented here. It was found that the total pressure losses were caused by a number of flow mechanisms.
Technical Paper

A Parametric Simulation Model for Analyzing the Performance of a Steel-Tracked Feller Buncher

1999-09-13
1999-01-2785
A parametric simulation model of a steel-tracked feller buncher was developed1. This model can be used to predict the lift capacity, side tipping angles, grade-ability, and joint forces during a cutting cycle. The feller buncher is defined parametrically, allowing the user to quickly analyze different machine configurations simply by changing the value of a variable. Several simulations were performed to illustrate the application of the model.
Technical Paper

The Caterpillar D9L Impact Ripper

1987-04-01
870779
Caterpillar has introduced a new concept that shatters previous ripping limitations. The D9L Impact Ripper has extended the ripping capacity and productivity of the standard ripper tractor in heavy construcion, mining, and quarry applications. This paper describes the design objectives, development program, component selection, and the demonstrated productivity of the D9L Impact Ripper.
X