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Technical Paper

Energy-Absorbing Polyurethane Foam to Improve Vehicle Crashworthiness

1995-02-01
950553
Federal legislation mandates that automotive OEMS provide occupant protection in collisions involving front and side impacts This legislation, which is to be phased-in over several years, covers not only passenger cars but also light-duty trucks and multipurpose passenger vehicles (MPVs) having a gross vehicle weigh rating (GVWR) of 8,500 lb (3,850 kg) or less. During a frontal impact, occupants within the vehicle undergo rapid changes in velocity. This is primarily due to rapid vehicle deceleration caused by the rigid nature of the vehicle's metal frame components and body assembly. Many of today's vehicles incorporate deformable, energy-absorbing (EA) structures within the vehicle structure to manage the collision energy and slow the deceleration which in turn can lower the occupant velocity relative to the vehicle. Occupant velocities can be higher in light-duty trucks and MPVs having a full-frame structure resulting in increased demands on the supplemental restraint system (SRS).
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Impact Test Accelerations: A Damage Index for the Head and Torso

1970-02-01
700902
The head Severity Index concept has attracted widespread attention in the automotive industry. This index is intended to estimate human survivability in a systematic way without relying on judgment values. It is employed for evaluating the probability of internal head injury for those indeterminate conditions where the human tolerance limits are not clearly defined. This paper discusses a damage index which is believed to be superior to the current Severity Index in several respects: 1. The concept is applicable to internal injuries of the torso as well as the head. 2. It is felt to describe the actual damage mechanism more directly. 3. It fits the Wayne State head tolerance curve better than the Severity Index. 4. It is suitable for analyzing impact pulses of any time duration. Examples cited in this paper include rocket sled exposures (250 ms duration) down to severe head impacts (5 ms duration). 5. It is more convenient to employ.
Technical Paper

Computer Aided Design Analysis of Instrument Panel Impact Zone

1983-02-01
830260
In anticipation of complying with European standards for impact protection, an instrument panel design was analyzed to determine A. impact zone boundaries B. impact test velocitiesfor the head of a front seat passenger. Chrysler computer aided design (C.A.D.) surfacing capabilities were utilized in the solution. Early knowledge of impact zone location is important to intelligent design decisions; knowledge of impact velocities aids in performing compliance testing.
Technical Paper

Digital Recording of Vehicle Crash Data

1981-06-01
810810
This paper discusses the development and implementation of a 16 channel data acquisition system for high “G” impact testing which includes a self-contained, on-board data acquisition unit, a programmer-exerciser and debriefing subsystems. The microprocessor controlled, on-board unit contains all signal conditioning, A/D conversion hardware and logic to store 4K 12 bit samples of data per channel. This unit will debrief into an oscilloscope, a desk-top computer or a large disk-based minicomputer system. Advantages over previous systems include the elimination of costly hardware (such as umbilical cables and recorders), and a reduction in pre-test preparation and data processing time.
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