Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 14 of 14
Technical Paper

Life Cycle Management - A Manageable Approach for Integrating Life Cycle Management into Manufacturing

1996-02-01
961028
Environmental issues have significantly impacted automotive operations worldwide. Countries are continuing to ratchet down their allowable emissions and to remain competitive, all industries must take Life Cycle Management (LCM) and implement it into everyday practice. Economic competitiveness as a part of economic development is central to the nation's social and financial well-being. America must catch-up to the rest of the world in how it views government and industry relationships as well as how to focus costs within the corporate structure. The adversarial relationships between government and industry must give way to stronger partnerships. For this concept to succeed a long term view of problems must be made by a corporation and both short and long term actions taken to resolve these problems. Industry must help create the market for recycled goods and must “walk the talk” by using recycled goods where possible.
Technical Paper

Determination of Coastdown Mechanical Loss Ambient Correction Factors for use with J2263 Road Tests

1997-02-24
970269
Testing for vehicle emissions and fuel economy certification occurs primarily on chassis dynamometers in a laboratory setting and therefore the actual road conditions, such as forces due to tire rolling resistance and internal friction, must be simulated. Test track coastdown procedures measure vehicle road load forces and produce an equation which relates these forces to velocity. The recent inclusion of onboard anemometry has allowed the coastdown procedure to account for varying wind effects; however, the new anemometer based mechanical loss coefficients do not take into account ambient weather conditions. The two purposes of this study are (1) to determine the new tire rolling resistance temperature correction coefficient that should be used when test ambient temperature is different from the standard reference value of 68°F, and (2) to investigate the effects of auxiliary measurements, such as other ambient conditions and vehicle settings, on this correction coefficient.
Technical Paper

Experience in Sand Casting Aluminum MMC Prototype Components

1993-03-01
930179
Typical sand-casting techniques have been shown to be inappropriate in pouring particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) castings. New gating/risering configurations were necessary to produce castings of acceptable soundness. Several automotive components, including brake rotors, cylinder liners and camshaft thrust plates, were prepared using special techniques. Initial durability test results of several Al-MMC prototype components are presented.
Technical Paper

Suspension System Modeling and Structural Loading

1975-02-01
750134
The object of this paper is to present an overview of the procedure leading to the selection of suspension system pivot points, show how to resolve terrain and maneuver loads at the tire contact patch to the vehicles' structure, illustrate the modeling technique used for stress analysis of suspension system components, and illustrate a few examples of suspension system models used to aid in the solution of ride and handling problems.
Technical Paper

Vehicle to Vehicle Collisions Utilizing Energy Absorbing Units

1975-02-01
750110
This paper presents the possibility of utilizing shock absorbers to decrease the aggresivity of a large car towards a small car at an impact of 40 mph. Reduction of such aggresivity would result in more damage to the large car, thereby reducing the impact on the small car. The conclusions demonstrate a definite decreased aggresivity of the larger car. Increase of the shock stroke does cause the large car to be crushed more in car-to-car collision. However, this occured at speeds below 25 mph, not the 40 mph as set by the study.
Technical Paper

Brake and Clutch Pedal System Optimization Using Design for Manufacture and Assembly

1992-02-01
920774
This paper describes the application of the Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) method at Chrysler. Attention is focused on the development of the clutch and brake pedal and bracketry system of the PL project in the Small Car Platform. The Chrysler DFMA procedure including competitive evaluation and value engineering was utilized during the initial design phase involving product concept development from the original functional and manufacturing requirements. After the first laboratory tests, a number of key design and manufacturing concerns surfaced and led to a second cycle of DFMA analysis. The procedure permits major design functions and manufacturing and assembly process issues and criteria to be incorporated in the initial design stages.
Technical Paper

TRUCK PERFORMANCE— Computed versus Measured Data

1958-01-01
580040
THIS paper outlines tests made to verify the SAE recommended practice for estimating truck ability performance described in TR-82. The author has collected data on four vehicles and compares it with the results computed in TR-82 and with a Method X. The data includes information on air and rolling resistance, effect of wind velocity, chassis friction power, grade ability, and the like. The author concludes that the SAE method of TR-82 is at the present time the most reliable method for computing truck ability.
Technical Paper

CHRYSLER TORSION-AIRE SUSPENSION Across The Board

1958-01-01
580031
IN 1951 Chrysler Corp. began working on a new torsion suspension. In this paper the authors describe details of the development and design of the suspension, now available on 1957 cars. The authors claim the Torsion-Aire suspension has the following advantages: reduced highspeed float, boulevard harshness, impact harshness, road noise, body roll, nose dive, and acceleration squat; better directional stability and cornering ability; fewer lubrication points; and a better balanced ride. The main feature of the front suspension is the use of torsion bars. One of the principal advantages of torsion bars is their weight: 10 lb as compared to 15.8 lb for a 1956 production coil spring.
Technical Paper

Chrysler Energy Absorbing, Anti-Theft Steering Column

1970-02-01
700001
Chrysler Corp. has introduced two new features on their 1970 steering columns: an energy absorbing steering wheel which appears on the Barracuda and Challenger models; and an antitheft steering column which is standard on all car-lines. This paper describes the two engineering programs.
Technical Paper

The Chrysler “Sure-Brake” - The First Production Four-Wheel Anti-Skid System

1971-02-01
710248
The paper outlines testing, development, and operation of the first production four-wheel slip control system for passenger cars in the United States. The Chrysler Corp. calls the system “Sure-Brake,” but it is more generally known as “anti-skid.” The first portion of the paper deals with considerations that led Chrysler into the Sure-Brake system, the philosophy behind the system, and a detailed explanation of its operation. The second portion deals with the development and testing of the system, leading to its release as an option on the 1971 Imperial. The testing program introduced a new dimension to brake engineering. Before the advent of wheel slip control systems, many thousands of brake tests were conducted but were always terminated at the point of skid. These tests were also conducted mainly on black top or concrete roads. For the first time, thousands of stops were made at maximum deceleration on every available surface.
Technical Paper

Chrysler Corporation's Isolated Transverse Torsion Bar Front Suspension

1977-02-01
770179
To satisfy the objectives of Chrysler's new generation of compact vehicles, a unique front suspension system was created. This system has achieved an outstanding level of ride comfort while providing significant advantages in the basic vehicle packaging. The key to the system is the transverse torsion bar and bushings which serve the dual function of suspension spring and fore and aft restraint for the lower control arm. Producing this torsion bar in mass production required advances in both engineering and manufacturing technology.
X