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Technical Paper

Changes in Reliability During the Design and Development Process of a Vehicle's Electrical/Electronic Systems

1995-02-01
950826
The changes in reliability of the Electrical/Electronic Systems of a vehicle-line during its early design and development engineering processes have been studied. A computerized vehicle failure tracking system was used to provide results from several stages of early development vehicle testing at the proving grounds. The data were analyzed using a software program that assumes that failures in a repairable system, such as a car, occur as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process. Results suggest that, under normal circumstances, a significant and quantitative improvement in reliability is achievable as the system or component design progresses through the early design and development processes. This also provides a means of predicting future system(s) reliability when the system(s) is in production.
Technical Paper

Achieving Dent Resistance Improvements and Weight Reduction Through Stamping Process Optimization and Steel Substitution

1996-02-01
960025
Resistance to dents and dings, caused by plant handling and in-service use, is generally recognized as an important performance requirement for automotive outer body panels. This paper examines the dent resistance improvements that can be achieved by maximizing surface stretch, through adjustments to the press settings, and substitution of a higher strength steel grade. Initially, the stamping process was optimized using the steel supplied for production: a Ti/Nb-stabilized, ultra low carbon (ULC) grade. The stamping process was subsequently optimized with a Nb-stabilized, rephosphorized ULC steel, at various thicknesses. The formed panels were evaluated for percent surface stretch, percent thinning, in-panel yield strength after forming, and dent performance. The results showed that dent resistance can be significantly improved, even at a reduced steel thickness, thus demonstrating a potential for weight savings.
Technical Paper

Body-in-White Prototype Process in Chrysler's Jeep/Truck Platform

1993-11-01
933038
Chrysler Corporation's Jeep and Truck platform implemented a new design and prototype process for the body-in -white of a new pickup truck. A team approach achieved concurrent body design, stamping die design, assembly process development, and assembly tooling development. The first domestic US industry use of a 100% electronic design and release system was instrumental in the process. The new process produced a prototype body-in-white on time at 95 WBVP (weeks before volume production) with the highest level of production-intent components ever achieved within Chrysler at this stage of development.
Technical Paper

Dodge Ram Pickup Vehicle: From Human Factors Development to Production Intent Metal Assembly

1993-11-01
932988
To evaluate and refine interior architecture of the new Dodge Ram pickup truck three years before production, a road worthy interior package validation buck was built using a fiberglass body shell. Molds for the shell were made using CAD/CAM techniques. Advanced CAD/CAM techniques were used to build the interior buck of a subsequent model from individual panels molded in carbon fiber. This buck also included inner structural panels and interior trim components taken from CAD data. For this and subsequent new vehicle programs, refinement of construction techniques allows the bucks to serve as aids in product design and manufacturing feasibility studies.
Technical Paper

Five Year Outdoor Scab Corrosion Results on Zinc and Zinc Alloy Coated Sheet Steels

1993-10-01
932361
A comprehensive selection of automotive sheet steels were exposed in an outdoor scab corrosion test to provide a base-line of cosmetic corrosion performance. Eighteen different coated sheet steels along with CRS as a control were processed using two commercially available zinc phosphate chemistries. The phosphating was done using both immersion and spray phosphate processes in a laboratory and an automotive assembly plant. Scribe creepage results are reported for 5 years outdoor scab exposure. Comparisons of the scribe creepage behavior of CRS, zinc, and zinc alloy coatings and the effect of the phosphate treatment are provided. An estimate of 10 years field performance is made.
Technical Paper

New Concept Modular Manual Transmission Clutch and Flywheel Assembly

1992-09-01
922110
Most United States vehicle assembly plants produce significantly more automatic transmission equipped vehicles than manual transmission vehicles. Assembling these two vehicles on a common production line can create complexity problems. This paper describes the design and development of a pre-assembled manual transmission clutch and flywheel modular assembly which reduces most of these problems. This assembly is used on the 1993 model year mini-van with a 2.5L four cylinder engine. This modular clutch system utilizes the same starter ring gear carrier (driveplate) used on automatic transmission equipped vehicles. It pilots into the crankshaft similar to the automatic transmission torque converter. It is balanced as an assembly which results in a lower system imbalance. A significant system piece cost saving, in comparison with today's competitive market, was achieved.
Technical Paper

CHRYSLER TORSION-AIRE SUSPENSION Across The Board

1958-01-01
580031
IN 1951 Chrysler Corp. began working on a new torsion suspension. In this paper the authors describe details of the development and design of the suspension, now available on 1957 cars. The authors claim the Torsion-Aire suspension has the following advantages: reduced highspeed float, boulevard harshness, impact harshness, road noise, body roll, nose dive, and acceleration squat; better directional stability and cornering ability; fewer lubrication points; and a better balanced ride. The main feature of the front suspension is the use of torsion bars. One of the principal advantages of torsion bars is their weight: 10 lb as compared to 15.8 lb for a 1956 production coil spring.
Technical Paper

The Chrysler “Sure-Brake” - The First Production Four-Wheel Anti-Skid System

1971-02-01
710248
The paper outlines testing, development, and operation of the first production four-wheel slip control system for passenger cars in the United States. The Chrysler Corp. calls the system “Sure-Brake,” but it is more generally known as “anti-skid.” The first portion of the paper deals with considerations that led Chrysler into the Sure-Brake system, the philosophy behind the system, and a detailed explanation of its operation. The second portion deals with the development and testing of the system, leading to its release as an option on the 1971 Imperial. The testing program introduced a new dimension to brake engineering. Before the advent of wheel slip control systems, many thousands of brake tests were conducted but were always terminated at the point of skid. These tests were also conducted mainly on black top or concrete roads. For the first time, thousands of stops were made at maximum deceleration on every available surface.
Technical Paper

The Development of Auto Temp II

1972-02-01
720288
The development of the AUTO TEMP II Temperature Control System used in Chrysler Corp. vehicles is summarized. A description of the design, development, function, and manufacturing aspects of the control system is presented, with emphasis on unique control parameters, reliability, serviceability, and check-out of production assemblies. Auto Temp II was developed by Chrysler in conjunction with Ranco Incorporated. The servo-controlled, closed-loop system, which has a sensitivity of 0.5 F, utilizes a water-flow control valve for temperature control, along with a cold engine lockout. The basic components are: sensor string, servo, and amplifier. All automatic functions involving control of mass flow rate, temperature, and distribution of the air entering the vehicle, are encompassed in one control unit. All components are mechanically linked through the gear train and are responsive to the amplifier through the feedback potentiometer.
Technical Paper

CAE Applications in the Automotive Industry-The Use of CAD for Vehicle Packaging and Master Drafts

1985-02-01
850446
Computer-aided engineering (CAE) is generally recognized as an important method of improving productivity. One of the major benefits of this technology has been to reduce the amount of manual labor spent analyzing changes made to vehicle designs. By using existing data, computer-aided design (CAD) can be used to co-ordinate the spatial relationships of the driver, passengers, engines, suspensions, tires, driver controls, and other body and chassis components. Special files containing a specific set of user-defined CAD language instructions, referred to as macros, are discussed and illustrated. Also included are tire clearance studies and master reference vehicle dimension files.
Technical Paper

Chrysler's New Engine Performance Dynamometer Facility

1981-02-01
810286
A new 10 cell engine dynamometer complex, (Fig. 1) which provides optimized testing and development capacity for new lines of automotive power plants for the 1980's and beyond, has been built at Chrysler's Engineering Center. This modern facility combines “state of-the art” instrumentation for control, data gathering, and data analysis with new operating concepts which together allow for high levels of accuracy, repeatability, and productivity previously not attainable in the area of engine testing and development.
Technical Paper

Application of Induction Heating in Automotive Production

1935-01-01
350121
INDUCTION heating is a process or method by which metal parts are heated by simply placing them in an alternating magnetic field. The action is that of the transformer, whereby electrical energy is transferred or passed over to another isolated electric or secondary circuit by means of the magnetic field; thus, no physical attachments or electrical contacts are necessary to have electrical currents, which are dissipated as heat, flow in the parts to be processed. The strength and frequency of the alternating magnetic field can be selected to produce any desired rate of heating and ultimate temperature. A circuit can be set up to dry lacquer at 160 deg. fahr. on thin sheet-metal parts or to melt in record time immense steel ingots. Induction heating is now commercially applied in automotive production to many processes, and these are specified.
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