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Technical Paper

Design and Control of Transmission Systems using Physical Model Simulation

2010-04-12
2010-01-0898
Physical modeling has been used by the industry to improve development time and produce a quality product. In this paper, we will describe two methods used in system control to take advantage of the physical model. One method describes a complete transmission physical model with a full system control utilizing co-simulation techniques. Data will be presented, and comparison to vehicle data will be conducted and verified. The second method will illustrate how to utilize the physical model to improve system design and modification. In this method, vehicle data will be used as inputs to the model, the model output will be verified against vehicle output data. The two methods are excellent tools for the Design For Six Sigma process (DFSS design).
Technical Paper

Integrated Virtual Approach for Optimization of Vehicle Sensitivity to Brake Torque Variation

2013-04-08
2013-01-0596
Brake judder is a brake induced vibration that a vehicle driver experiences in the steering wheel or floor panel at highway speeds during vehicle deceleration. The primary cause of this disturbance phenomenon is the brake torque variation (BTV). Virtual CAE tools from both kinematics and compliance standpoints have been applied in analyzing sensitivities of the vehicle systems to BTV. This paper presents a recently developed analytical approach that identifies parameters of steering and suspension systems for achieving optimal settings that desensitize the vehicle response to BTV. The analytical steps of this integrated approach started with creating a lumped mass noise-vibration-harshness (NVH) control model and a separate multi-body dynamics (MBD) suspension model. Then, both models were linked to run in a sequence through optimization software so the results from the MBD model were used as quasi-static inputs to the lumped mass NVH model.
Technical Paper

A Design for Six Sigma Approach to Optimize a Front-Wheel-Drive Transmission for Improved Efficiency and Robustness

2011-04-12
2011-01-0720
Environmental concerns and government regulations are factors that have led to an increased focus on fuel economy in the automotive industry. This paper identifies a method used to improve the efficiency of a front-wheel-drive (FWD) automatic transmission. In order to create improvements in large complex systems, it is key to have a large scope, to include as much of the system as possible. The approach taken in this work was to use Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methodology. This was done to optimize as many of the front-wheel-drive transmission components as possible to increase robustness and efficiency. A focus of robustness, or consistency in torque transformation, is as important as the value of efficiency itself, because of the huge range of usage conditions. Therefore, it was necessary to find a solution of the best transmission component settings that would not depend on specific usage conditions such as temperatures, system pressures, or gear ratio.
Journal Article

Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) for Optimization of Automotive Heat Exchanger and Underhood Air Temperature

2014-04-01
2014-01-0729
In this paper a design methodology for automotive heat exchangers has been applied which brings robustness into the design process and helps to optimize the design goals: as to maintain an optimal coolant temperature and to limit the vehicle underhood air temperature within a tolerable limit. The most influential design factors for the heat exchangers which affect the goals have been identified with that process. The paper summarizes the optimization steps necessary to meet the optimal functional goals for the vehicle as mentioned above. Taguchi's [1] Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methods have been employed to conduct this analysis in a robust way.
Journal Article

Transient Thermal Analysis of Diesel Fuel Systems

2012-04-16
2012-01-1049
In this paper, a transient thermal analysis model for Diesel fuel systems is presented. The purpose of this work is to determine the fuel temperature at various locations along the system, especially inside the tank and at the returned fuel inlet to the tank. Due to the fact that the fuel level is continuously changing during any driving condition, the fuel mass inside the tank is also continuously changing. Consequently, the fuel temperature will change even under steady driving or idle conditions, therefore, this problem should be analyzed using transient thermal analysis models. Effective thermal management requires controlling the surface temperature of the fuel tank, fuel lines and the fuel temperature at the fuel return line as well as inside the tank [1, 2]. Based on the thermal analysis results, it is possible to determine the major source of heat input at several locations of the fuel system.
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