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Technical Paper

Identification of the Best Modal Parameters and Strategies for FE Model Updating

2001-04-30
2001-01-1439
The use of numerical models as basis to assemble or modify all kind of new structures is increasing over the last years. This has as benefit that it reduces the number of expensive, physical prototypes. These numerical models however must be verified and validated against measured data. Updating is generally needed to guarantee accurate correspondence with reality. This paper focuses on an exhaust. It describes the different steps of the complete process from the acquisition till the updating. On the measurement side, some typical acquisition measures and an efficient approach to handle (slightly) inconsistent data sets is explained. On the numerical side, it is investigated how to achieve the final updated exhaust with physical relevant characteristics.
Technical Paper

Numerical Modeling of Engine Noise Radiation through the use of Acoustic Transfer Vectors - A Case Study

2001-04-30
2001-01-1514
This paper presents the numerical modeling of noise radiated by an engine, using the so-called Acoustic Transfer Vectors and Modal Acoustic Transfer Vectors concept. Acoustic Transfer Vectors are input-output relations between the normal structural velocity of the radiating surface and the sound pressure level at a specific field point and can thus be interpreted as an ensemble of Acoustic Transfer Functions from the surface nodes to a single field point or microphone position. The modal counter part establishes the same acoustic transfer expressed in modal coordinates of the radiating structure. The method is used to evaluate the noise radiated during an engine run-up in the frequency domain. The dynamics of the engine is described using a finite element model loaded with a rpm-dependent excitation. The effectiveness of the method in terms of calculation speed, compared with classical boundary element methods, is illustrated.
Technical Paper

Sound Quality Equivalent Modeling for Virtual Car Sound Synthesis

2001-04-30
2001-01-1540
The pressure on development cycles in the automotive industry forces the acoustical engineers to create awareness of sound quality in the early stages of development, perhaps even before a physical prototype is available. Currently, designers have few tools to help them listen to their “virtual” models. For the design of a synthesis platform of in-vehicle binaural sound, the sound should be modeled with almost identical sound quality perception. A concept is presented where the total sound of a vehicle is split in a number of components, each with its own sound characteristics. These characteristics are described in a signal model that allows the analysis of an existing sound into a limited number of signal components: orders-frequency spectra, time envelopes and time recordings.
Technical Paper

Measuring a Geometry by Photogrammetry: Evaluation of the Approach in View of Experimental Modal Analysis on Automotive Structures

2001-04-30
2001-01-1473
The very first step when starting an experimental modal analysis project is the definition of the geometry used for visualization of the resulting mode shapes. This geometry includes measurement points with a label and corresponding coordinates, and usually also connections and surfaces to allow a good visualization of the measured mode. This step, even if it sounds straightforward, can be quite time consuming and is often done in a rather approximate way. Photogrammetry is a technique that extracts 2D or 3D information through the process of analyzing and interpreting photographs. It is widely used for the creation of topographic maps or city maps, and more and more for quick modeling of civil engineering structures or accident reconstruction. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of this technique in the context of modal testing of automotive structures.
Technical Paper

Predictive Analysis for Engine/Driveline Torsional Vibration in Vehicle Conditions using Large Scale Multi Body Model

2003-05-05
2003-01-1726
Driveline torsional vibration in vehicles equipped with an automatic gearbox can lead to increased fuel consumption. At low rpm the torque converter of the automatic gearbox is active. The earlier the torque converter can be disengaged and bypassed by a lock-up clutch, the better the efficiency of the engine. Torsional vibrations in the drivetrain could prevent this early locking of the torque convertor and thus lead to a higher fuel consumption. Furthermore, these torsional vibrations can also lead to lower driver comfort. In order to improve the efficiency and the passenger comfort, a hybrid approach has been developed to predict the torsional vibrations of a full vehicle during a run-up manoeuvre on a chassis dyno, including transient effects. The hybrid approach is based on multi body modeling of the full car in LMS DADS, taking into account the flexibility of all major components of the powertrain.
Technical Paper

Inverse Numerical Acoustics of a Truck Engine

2003-05-05
2003-01-1692
Source identification applied to a truck engine and using inverse numerical acoustics is presented. The approach is based on acoustic transfer vectors (ATV) and truncated singular value decomposition (SVD). Acoustic transfer vectors are arrays of transfer functions between surface normal velocity and acoustic pressure at response points. They can be computed using boundary element methods (indirect, direct or multi-domain direct formulations) or finite element methods (in physical or modal coordinates). Regularization techniques such as the so-called L-curve approach are used to identify the optimum SVD truncation. To increase the reliability of the source identification, the approach can use velocity measurements on the boundary surface as well as the standard nearfield pressure measurements. It also allows for linear or spline interpolation of the acoustic transfer vectors in the frequency domain, to increase computational speed.
Technical Paper

Identification, Quantification and Reduction of Structural- Borne Road Noise in a Mid-Size Passenger Car

1996-02-01
960195
This paper presents the measurement & analysis procedures and the results of a complete road noise identification and reduction project on a midsize passenger car. Operational interior noise signals and structural accelerations are measured for several test conditions. The operating data are decomposed into sets of mathematically independent phenomena by Principal Component Analysis. Operating Deflection Shape Analysis and Transfer Path Analysis are applied to each of these independent phenomena. Critical transfer paths are thus identified and quantified. The interior sound level is amplified when the frequency content of the transmitted energy coincides with structural resonances or standing waves of the interior car cavity. The vehicle is dynamically characterized by Experimental Structural Modal Analysis and by Acoustic Modal Analysis.
Technical Paper

Experimental Determination of Low Frequency Noise Contributions of Interior Vehicle Body Panels in Normal Operation

1996-02-01
960194
Low frequency noise from engine- and wheel-vibrations often dominates the interior noise spectrum in vehicles. For the optimization of vehicle bodies it is necessary to know the contribution of individual body panels to sound pressures at the passengers ear. An experimental approach is presented which makes use of reciprocal acoustic transfer function measurements and surface acceleration measurements in normal road operation. This method, called Airborne Source Quantification, has been applied as a diagnostic tool to the interior noise of a four cylinder diesel engined van.
Technical Paper

Updating of Dynamic Finite Element Models Based on Experimental Receptances and the Reduced Analytical Dynamic Stiffness Matrix

1995-05-01
951247
This paper presents a model updating method based on experimental receptances. The presented method minimises the so called ‘indirect receptance difference’. First, the reduced analytical dynamic stiffness matrix is expressed as an approximate, linearised function of the updating parameters. In a numerically stable, iterative procedure, this reduced analytical dynamic stiffness matrix is changed in such a way that the analytical receptances match the experimental receptances at the updating frequencies. The updating frequencies are a set of selected frequency points in the frequency range of interest. Some considerations about an optimal selection of the updating frequencies are given. Finally, a mixed static-dynamic reduction scheme is discussed. Dynamic reduction of the analytical dynamic stiffness matrix at each updating frequency is physically exact, but it involves a great computational effort.
Technical Paper

Application of a FRF Based Model Updating Technique for the Validation of Finite Element Models of Components of the Automotive Industry

1995-05-01
951246
This paper presents two applications of the RADSER model updating technique (ref. 1). The RADSER technique updates finite element model parameters by solution of a linearised set of equations that optimise the Reduced Analytical Dynamic Stiffness matrix based on Experimental Receptances. The first application deals with the identification of the dynamice characteristics of rubber mounts. The second application validates a coarse finite element model of a subframe of a Volvo 480.
Technical Paper

Using Mechanical-Acoustic Reciprocity for Diagnosis of Structure Borne Sound in Vehicles

1993-05-01
931340
The low frequency interior noise in cars is for a large part the result of structure borne excitation. The transfer of the structure borne sound involves a large number of components of the engine suspension, wheel suspension and chassis which are all potentially contributing to the overall noise level. This process can be analyzed through a combination of transfer function measurements with operational measurements under normal conditions. This technique, called transfer path analysis, requires large numbers of transfer function measurements with excitation of the body or cabin at the rubber mountings. Unfortunately, bad access to these crucial measurement locations causes either high instrumentation and measurement effort or less accurate measurement data. The practicality and quality of the measurements can be improved by using reciprocal measurements for the mechano-acoustic transfer of the body or cabin structure; a loudspeaker in the cavity is used for the reciprocal excitation.
Technical Paper

Structural Design Changes as a Solution to a Resonance Fatigue Problem of a Sports Car

1993-05-01
931341
Optimal design changes to solve vibration induced fatigue failures can only be derived by including structural dynamics considerations into the fatigue lifetime calculation process. Such an integrated design approach to resonance fatigue problems has been developed within the EC Esprit Project 2486 DYNAMO. Also an integration of crack initiation and crack growth calculations has been realised. This integrated dynamic analysis/fatigue analysis procedure is demonstrated in the paper by means of a resonance fatigue problem of a car.
Technical Paper

Suspension Analysis in View of Road Noise Optimization

1993-05-01
931343
As powertrain noise is better and better controlled, road inputs become more important. The trend to mount 6 cylinder engines in smaller cars also emphasizes the importance of road induced noise. A method to qualify and quantify the different contributions is presented and illustrated. This methodology is based on a novel combination of existing technology: transferpath analysis, traditionally used for ranking of powertrain inputs on one hand and principal component analysis, traditionally used for visualisation of operating shapes in a multiple uncorrelated input environment. As suspension inputs represent multiple incoherent sources, the classical vector summation used in noise path analysis is not applicable. On the other hand, root mean square summation of all contributions does not keep track of phase relations between suspension-body connections which are important in the understanding of the global picture.
Technical Paper

Integrated Engineering for Optimized Structural Dynamics Analysis

1992-04-01
920909
“Noise and vibration are not invented here!”. Undesirable structural dynamic behaviour is normally experienced on final assemblies, by which time the underlying cause of the problem is difficult to solve intuitively. Solving the problems classically involves the partial breakdown of assemblies and the application of various structural dynamics testing and analysis procedures. Preferably, noise and vibration problems should be avoided by designing the product right the first time, by the use of various integrated analysis and testing disciplines, from the component level to the final assembly. Such an approach is referred to, in a broader sense, by trendy themes as concurrent engineering, forward engineering, simultaneous engineering.... This paper analyzes trends in analytical and experimental structural dynamics toward better integration of the various discipline oriented techniques that are currently used.
Technical Paper

Optimizing Valve Rotational Speed Using Taguchi Techniques

2010-04-12
2010-01-1096
As fuel economy regulations increase and customer preference shifts to smaller, higher power density engines it is more important to effectively cool certain areas of the cylinder head and valvetrain. In order to maximize valvetrain life and increase engine performance it is critical to maintain a near uniform valve seat temperature to enable proper sealing. As cylinder head bridges narrow, and the temperature increases, the water jacket may not be sufficient. An alternative method to ensuring equal temperature distribution across the valve is to promote low speed valve rotation. This will not only aid, cooling the valve seat, as well as cooling and cleaning the valves' seating surface. This paper describes the development and testing of a valve rotation study, utilizing the Taguchi approach in order to determine the most robust design. A test stand was utilized to examine the valve rotation in which the cam was driven directly using a DC motor.
Technical Paper

The Consequences of Average Curve Generation: Implications for Biomechanics Data

2010-11-03
2010-22-0001
One method of understanding the general mechanical response of a complex system such as a vehicle, a human surrogate, a bridge, a boat, a plane, etc., is to subject it to an input, such as an impact, and obtain the response time-histories. The responses can be accelerations, velocities, strains, etc. In general, when experiments of this type are run the responses are contaminated by sample-to-sample variation, test-to-test variability, random noise, instrumentation noise, and noise from unknown sources. One common method of addressing the noise in the system to obtain the underlying response is to run multiple tests on different samples that represent the same system and add them together obtaining an average. This functionally reduces the random noise. However, if the fundamental response of each sample is not the same, then it is not altogether clear what the average represents. It may not capture the underlying physics.
Technical Paper

Noise Contribution Analysis at Suspension Interfaces Using Different Force Identification Techniques

2011-05-17
2011-01-1600
Road-tire induced vibrations are in many vehicles determining the interior noise levels in (semi-) constant speed driving. The understanding of the noise contributions of different connections of the suspension systems to the vehicle is essential in improvement of the isolation capabilities of the suspension- and body-structure. To identify these noise contributions, both the forces acting at the suspension-to-body connections points and the vibro-acoustic transfers from the connection points to the interior microphones are required. In this paper different approaches to identify the forces are compared for their applicability to road noise analysis. First step for the force identification is the full vehicle operational measurement in which target responses (interior noise) and indicator responses (accelerations or other) are measured.
Technical Paper

Time-Domain Source Contribution Analysis Method for In-Room Pass-By Noise

2011-05-17
2011-01-1609
This paper presents a new time-domain source contribution analysis method for in-room pass-by noise. The core of the method is a frequency-domain ASQ model (Airborne Source Quantification) representing each noise generating component (engine, exhaust, left and right tyres, etc.) by a number of acoustic sources. The ASQ model requires the measurement of local FRF's and acoustic noise transfer functions to identify the operational loads from nearby pressure indicator responses and propagate the loads to the various target microphones on the sides of the vehicle. Once a good ASQ model is obtained, FIR filters are constructed, allowing a time-domain synthesis of the various source contributions to each target microphone. The synthesized target response signals are finally recombined into a pass-by sound by taking into account the speed profile of the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Synthesis of Drive-by Noise Based on Numerically Evaluated Source-Receiver Transfer Functions Employing the FMBEM

2011-05-17
2011-01-1610
Prediction of the drive-by noise level in the early design stage of an automotive vehicle is feasible if the source signatures and source-receiver transfer functions may be determined from simulations based on the available CAD/CAE models. This paper reports on the performance of a drive-by noise synthesis procedure in which the transfer functions are numerically evaluated by employing the Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method (FMBEM). The proposed synthesis procedure first computes the steady-state receiver contributions of the sources as appearing from a number of vehicle positions along the drive path. In a second step, these contributions are then combined into a single transient signal from a moving vehicle for each source-receiver pair by means of a travel time correction.
Technical Paper

Design and Control of Transmission Systems using Physical Model Simulation

2010-04-12
2010-01-0898
Physical modeling has been used by the industry to improve development time and produce a quality product. In this paper, we will describe two methods used in system control to take advantage of the physical model. One method describes a complete transmission physical model with a full system control utilizing co-simulation techniques. Data will be presented, and comparison to vehicle data will be conducted and verified. The second method will illustrate how to utilize the physical model to improve system design and modification. In this method, vehicle data will be used as inputs to the model, the model output will be verified against vehicle output data. The two methods are excellent tools for the Design For Six Sigma process (DFSS design).
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