Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
Technical Paper

Predictive Modeling of Impact of ANR Non-Uniformity on Transient SCR System DeNOx Performance

2015-04-14
2015-01-1055
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a promising technology for meeting the stringent requirements pertaining to NOx emissions. One of the most important requirements to achieve high DeNOx performance is to have a high uniformity of ammonia to NOx ratio (ANR) at the SCR catalyst inlet. Steady state 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are frequently used for predicting ANR spatial distribution but are not feasible for running a transient cycle like Federal Test Procedure (FTP). On the other hand, 1D kinetic models run in real time and can predict transient SCR performance but do not typically capture the effect of non-axial non-uniformities. In this work, two 3D to 1D coupling methods have been developed to predict transient SCR system performance, taking the effect of ANR non-uniformity into account. First is a probability density function (PDF) based approach and the second is a geometrical sector based approach.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of a Predictive Model for DEF Injection and Urea Decomposition in Mobile SCR DeNOx Systems

2010-04-12
2010-01-0889
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of oxides of nitrogen with ammonia gas is a key technology that is being favored to meet stringent NOx emission standards across the world. Typically, in this technology, a liquid mixture of urea and water - known as Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) - is injected into the hot exhaust gases leading to atomization and subsequent spray processes. The water content vaporizes, while the urea content undergoes thermolysis and forms ammonia and isocyanic acid, that can form additional ammonia through hydrolysis. Due to the increasing interest in SCR technology, it is desirable to have capabilities to model these processes with reasonable accuracy to both improve the understanding of processes important to the aftertreatment and to aid in system optimization. In the present study, a multi-dimensional model is developed to simulate DEF spray processes and the conversion of urea to ammonia. The model is then implemented into a commercial CFD code.
Technical Paper

Thermal and Fluid Dynamic Considerations in Aftertreatment System Design for SCR Solid Deposit Mitigation

2012-04-16
2012-01-1287
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) with ammonia gas has established itself as an effective diesel aftertreatment technology to meet stringent emission standards enforced by worldwide regulatory bodies. Typically, in this technology, aqueous urea solution of eutectic composition - known as Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) - is injected into hot exhaust gases leading to a series of thermal, fluid dynamic and reactive processes that eventually produces the ammonia necessary for NOx reduction reactions within monolithic catalytic substrates. Incomplete decomposition of the injected urea can lead to formation of solid deposits that adversely affect system performance by increasing the engine back pressure, reducing de-NOx efficiency, and lowering the overall fuel economy.
Journal Article

Development of Flow Uniformity Indices for Performance Evaluation of Aftertreatment Systems

2011-04-12
2011-01-1239
With the on- and off-road diesel engine emission regulations getting more stringent across the world, diesel aftertreatment systems are expected to deliver outstanding performance and reliability. These objectives should be met by fulfilling tight packaging constraints and incurring only modest material and testing costs. A major strategy for meeting these often conflicting requirements is the effective use of simulation tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in system design and performance evaluation. Prerequisites for using this CFD analysis-led-design approach, however, are knowledge of the confidence level of the predictions and knowledge of the appropriate transfer functions that establish the relationships between the measured performance parameters and model predictions. The primary aim of the present work is to develop statistically and physically relevant measures that assess the uniformity of flow in aftertreatment systems.
X