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Technical Paper

Evaluation of Microalloyed Steel for Articulated Piston Applications in Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

2000-03-06
2000-01-1232
AISI-4140H steel has been used as articulated piston crown material in heavy-duty engines. With the driving force for reducing manufacturing cost, microalloyed steel (MAS) was identified as a low-cost material to replace 4140H steel. In order to determine the feasibility of using MAS to replace 4140H steel, a test program was initiated to fully evaluate the material properties of MAS and to compare them to those of the baseline 4140H steel. The physical and mechanical properties of both materials from room temperature to 550°C were evaluated. The effect of long term thermal exposure on the material properties was also studied. Some engine tests were also conducted to evaluate the performance of the articulated pistons made with both materials. The inherently lower strength of MAS as compared to 4140H steel, requires a total re-design of the piston for the utilization of MAS as a low-cost replacement material for 4140H steel.
Technical Paper

Cummins Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report, 2000

2000-06-19
2000-01-2196
The Automotive Market in the United States is moving in the direction of more Light Trucks and fewer Small Cars. The customers for these vehicles have not changed, only their purchase decisions. Cummins has studied the requirements of this emerging market. Design and development of an engine system that will meet these customer needs has started. The engine system is a difficult one, since the combined requirements of a very fuel-efficient commercial diesel, and the performance and sociability requirements of a gasoline engine are needed. Results of early testing are presented which show that the diesel is possibly a good solution.
Technical Paper

Tribological Investigations for an Insulated Diesel Engine

1983-02-01
830319
A Minimum Cooled Engine (MCE) has been successfully run for 250 hours at rated condition of 298 kW and 1900 rpm. This engine was all metallic without any coolant in the block and lower part of the heads. Ring/liner/lubricant system and thermal loading on the liner at top ring reversal (TRR) as well as on the piston are presented and discussed. Ring/liner wear is given as well as oil consumption and blow-by data during the endurance run. Another engine build with a different top ring coating and several lubricants suggested that a 1500 hours endurance run of MCE is achievable. Rig test data for screening ring materials and synthetic lubricants necessary for a successful operation of a so-called Adiabatic Engine with the ring/ceramic liner (SiN) interface temperature up to 650°C are presented and discussed.
Technical Paper

A Numerical Study of the Transient Evaporating Spray Mixing Process in the Diesel Environment

1983-10-31
831735
Some results of a systematic study of the effects of fuel and chamber gas properties on the transient evaporating spray mixing process are presented. The study uses an existing two-dimensional stochastic thick spray model. The results show that the combustion process in typical heavy duty, quiescent, DI diesel engines can be mixing limited rather than vaporization limited. In addition, the results show that the mixing process of a transient evaporating spray is characterized by the combined effects of fuel evaporation and its turbulent mixing with the surrounding air. In general, increasing the evaporation rate alone does not necessarily increase the fuel-air mixing rate. Furthermore, two dimensionless parameters have been used to quantify the relative effects of fuel and chamber gas properties on the transient spray evaporation process. Finally, through detailed comparisons between spray and gas jet results, the transient evaporating spray mixing process is better understood.
Technical Paper

Performance and Regeneration Characteristics of a Cellular Ceramic Diesel Particulate Trap

1982-02-01
820272
Fundamental aspects of performance and regeneration of a porous ceramic particulate trap are described. Dimensionless correlations are given for pressure drop vs. flow conditions for clean and loaded traps. An empirical relationship between estimated particulate deposits and a loading parameter that distinguishes pressure drop changes due to flow variations from particulate accumulation is presented. Results indicate that trapping efficiencies exceed 90% under most conditions and pressure drop doubles when particulate accumulation occupies only 5% of the available void volume. Regeneration was achieved primarily by throttling the engine intake air. For various combinations of initial loading level, trap inlet temperature and oxygen concentration, it was found that regeneration rate peaked after 45 seconds from initiation.
Technical Paper

Torsional Vibrations in a Mechanical Drive

1982-02-01
821029
Torsional vibrations of an engine-powered hydraulic system were analyzed. The system consisted of: a diesel engine, spline shaft with clearance, universal joints, propeller shaft, mechanical transmission with clutch engagement, hydraulic pump, and a load. Excessive torsional vibrations resulted in propeller, spline shaft, and U-joint failures. Although the system had been adequately designed for the steady-state horsepower requirements of the pump, field failures began to occur after several systems were built and delivered. A nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed, which included variations in system parameters. The analysis revealed that two design changes would reduce the dynamic stresses. These were to increase spline clearance and to add a torsional damper to the propeller shaft.
Technical Paper

Effects of Injection Timing and Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Emissions from a D.I. Diesel Engine

1981-10-01
811234
Some results of a systematic study on the effects of injection timing retard and exhaust gas recirculation on emissions from a D.I. diesel engine are presented. The factors investigated include engine speed, fuel rate, injection timing, injection pressure, intake charge oxygen concentration, and type of diluent. The detailed mechanisms governing the formation and control of nitric oxide are studied analytically, using a previously developed diesel combustion model based on transient fuel-air mixing and Zeldovich nitric oxide reaction mechanisms. The results show that exhaust gas recirculation and injection timing retard are both effective in reducing nitric oxide emissions at the expense of increasing smoke. The reduction of nitric oxide with exhaust gas recirculation and injection timing retard is mainly related to the decrease of local temperature and local atomic oxygen concentration.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Analytical Studies of Cylinder Head Cooling

1993-04-01
931122
Previous work on the cooling jackets of the Cummins L10 engine revealed flow separation, and low coolant velocities in several critical regions of the cylinder head. The current study involved the use of detailed cooling jacket temperature measurements, and finite element heat transfer analysis to attempt the identification of regions of pure convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling. Although difficult to detect with certainty, both the measurements and analysis pointed strongly to the presence of nucleate boiling in several regions. Little or no evidence of film boiling was seen, even under very high operating loads. It was thus concluded that the regions of seemingly inadequate coolant flow remained quite effective in controlling cylinder head temperatures. The Cummins L10 upon which this study has focused is an in-line six cylinder, four-stroke direct injection diesel engine, with a displacement of 10 liters.
Technical Paper

Combustion Chamber Insulation Effect on the Performance of a Low Heat Rejection Cummins V-903 Engine

1986-03-01
860317
Cummins Engine Company is developing a low heat rejection 450 kW engine under contract for the US Army Tank & Automotive Command. This paper discusses progress made toward achieving the program goals of 6.6 kcal/kW-min brake specific heat rejection and 200 g/kW-hr brake specific fuel consumption. Methodology for measuring heat rejection on a low heat rejection engine is presented. Design improvements of the base engine are discussed along with their effect on improving fuel consumption. Performance test data is assessed in terms of the first law energy balance and cooling load distribution. The heat rejection data provides insights on the performance of insulating components and two cooling system designs. Diesel cycle simulations are compared to the test data and are used to predict the effect of ceramic insulation on engine heat rejection.
Technical Paper

Test Cell Simulation of the Driveby Noise Test

1987-08-01
870967
Diesel engine manufacturers have traditionally done most engine noise development work under steady: state operating conditions. However, truck driveby noise tests are acceleration tests, and engines exhibit different noise behavior under accelerating conditions. Acceleration noise can be affected by engine performance parameters which may have no influence on steady state noise levels. In this study, a test cell simulation of the truck driveby procedure has been developed and evaluated. Test cell simulation and truck driveby results are compared for a naturally-aspirated and a turbocharged engine. This simulation procedure has been shown to predict reliably results measured in vehicles. As a result, the simulation can be used to evaluate engine modifications during the development process without requiring a vehicle installation.
Technical Paper

An Evaluation of the Lucas Combustion Noise Meter on Cummins ‘B’ Series Engines

1987-08-01
870952
Lucas Industries Noise Centre has introduced a combustion noise meter which is designed to predict the contribution of the combustion process to overall diesel engine noise. The performance of the meter is evaluated using Cummins B series engines in naturally-aspirated and turbocharged form. Combustion noise levels predicted by the meter are compared to levels determined using traditional techniques. The effects of several engine operating parameters on combustion noise are investigated under both steady state and accelerating conditions. The meter reliably predicts changes in combustion noise levels, and is a useful tool for performance development engineers. Combustion noise is shown to be related to the maximum rate of pressure rise at the onset of combustion, but combustion noise is not reliably related to maximum cylinder pressures.
Technical Paper

Cummins/TACOM Adiabatic Englue Program

1985-02-25
850356
Joint development of the adiabatic engine by Cummins Engine Company and the U. S. Army began with a feasibility analysis ten years ago. The effort was initially driven by the expectation of substantial performance improvement, a reduction in cooling system size, and several additional benefits. Program emphasis turned quickly to experimentation with the goal of demonstrating the feasibility of the adiabatic engine in working hardware. Several significant achievements were realized as have been reported earlier. Further development of the adiabatic engine is expected to be more evolutionary, paced by available technology in the areas of materials and tribology. Analysis capability necessary for insulated engine development has been found to be inadequate. Additional effort has gone into the development and validation of insulated engine analysis tools, both for cycle simulation and structural modeling.
Technical Paper

Combustion Chamber Component Analysis for Advanced Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

1989-09-01
891900
Detailed thermal analysis was conducted on several advanced cylinder head, liner, and piston concepts, for low heat rejection diesel engines. The analysis was used to define an optimized engine configuration. Results pointed to the strategic use of oil cooling and insulation in the cylinder head, an oil cooled cylinder liner, and an insulated piston, with separate insulation behind the compression rings. Such a configuration reduced in-cylinder heat rejection by 30 percent, while durability would be expected to be maintained or improved from today's production levels.
Technical Paper

Engineered Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesels

1989-02-01
890297
Through an integrated process involving thermal/mechanical analysis, coating property characterization, plasma spray process control, and rig testing under simulated engine thermal conditions, plasma sprayed zirconia coatings have been defined which offer a high degree of thermal insulation. Analytical and rig tests results showed that a multi-layer coating, combined with control of residual stress during fabrication, offered the greatest potential for meeting the thermal insulation goals while providing the required durability in piston crown and cylinder head applications. Coating thicknesses ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 mm (0.06 to 0.10 inch) were evaluated and tested in the laboratory. Single cylinder engine tests of the multi-layer thermal barrier coatings have demonstrated that coatings up to 2.54 mm (0.10 in.) thick on pistons can operate at 1.03 MPa (150 psi) brake mean effective pressures (BMEP).
Technical Paper

Testing Procedures for Introduction of Silicon Carbide and Carbon Water Pump Seal Faces into Heavy Duty Diesel Service

1993-03-01
930585
Testing procedures to evaluate new coolant pump seal face materials and new coolant pump seal designs were evaluated. Rig testing of materials and seals followed by engine dynamometer testing enabled changes in the seal materials or design to be validated prior to field testing and limited production. These procedures were used to test and implement a coolant pump seal face material change to silicon carbide versus carbon. The change resulted in higher reliability for the coolant pump seal and reduced warranty cost for the engine.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Bowl Offset on Air motion in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine

1988-10-01
881611
The influence of bowl offset on motored mean flow and turbulence in a direct injection diesel engine has been examined with the aid of a multi-dimensional flow code. Results are presented for three piston geometries. The bowl geometry of each piston was the same, while the offset between the bowl and the cylinder axis was varied from 0.0 to 9.6% of the bore. The swirl ratio at intake valve closing was also varied from 2.60 to 4.27. It was found that the angular momentum of the air at TDC was decreased by less than 8% when the bowl was offset. Nevertheless, the mean (squish and swirl) flows were strongly affected by the offset. In addition, the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (predicted by the k-e model) was modified. Moderate increases (10% or less) in mass averaged turbulence intensity at TDC with offset were observed. However, the TDC turbulent diffusivity was changed less than 3% due to a slight decrease in turbulent length scale with increasing offset.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Emulsified Fuels and Water Induction on Diesel Combustion

1970-02-01
700736
Water was inducted with the intake air and injected emulsified with the fuel, in a conventional single cylinder D.I. diesel engine. The major effects of inducted water were an increase in ignition delay, and reduction in the oxides of nitrogen and smoke at a constant fuel/air ratio. When the water was emulsified with the fuel, the ignition delay increased so much that no benefits were obtained except for a reduction in smoke. The results are compared to a similar study on an engine with the “M” combustion system. The major differences between the results obtained with the two combustion systems are attributed to the differences in the ignition delay caused by the water addition.
Technical Paper

Design Factors That Affect Diesel Emissions

1971-02-01
710484
Although diesels, as a group, are a relatively small source of air pollutants, emissions standards which limit emissions from diesels have been adopted by California and the federal government. Test procedures and instrumentation for measuring diesel emissions have been developed, and an understanding of how engine design parameters affect emissions is evolving. Smoke and carbon monoxide are primarily functions of fuel-air ratio. Smoke is also affected by injection timing, air motion, and fuel spray characteristics. Hydrocarbon emissions are most affected by details of injector design and matching of the spray geometry with the combustion chamber shape. Nitric oxide emissions are controlled by local oxygen availability in regions of high temperature and residence time at the high temperature.
Technical Paper

Cummins V504 and V555 Engines

1971-02-01
710131
The Cummins V504 and V555 engines were developed for construction, industrial, agricultural, marine and medium duty automotive market requirements of lightweight, compact diesel engines in the 185-240 hp range. The engine design and development objectives were to obtain high reliability and durability combined with good overall efficiency in a compact package size. These objectives were achieved by careful attention to design details, combustion system development and extensive laboratory and field evaluation.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Noise Reduction Hardware for Vehicle Noise Control

1973-02-01
730681
A range of noise reduction hardware is described for three production engine models, as well as the rationale for selecting noise reduction methods. Noise reductions up to 6 dB(A) were achieved with this hardware in the test cell. In many cases the modifications are more effective in vehicles. The success of the hardware in reducing overall vehicle noise is illustrated.
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