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Technical Paper

Microprocessor Based Electrohydraulic Control For Car Haulers

1988-09-01
881278
Car hauler ramps have historically been hydraulically positioned via banks of manual control valves that provide limited operator visibility and flexibility. On some enclosed type haulers, manual valves are not feasible. An electro-hydraulic system has been developed utilizing on/off solenoid valve stacks. A handheld control unit with a membrane switch pad communicates with a valve interface module near each valve stack. The handheld unit and the interface modules each have microprocessor circuitry to provide intelligent distributed control. Self monitoring circuitry provides safety features and system diagnostics. Wiring harness assemblies connect the valve stacks to the interface modules. A retractile cable from the handheld unit to the trailer allows improved operator mobility and visibility. An infrared wireless interface between the trailer and handheld unit will also be available.
Technical Paper

Preliminary Numerical Analysis of Valve Fatigue in a Checkball Pump for Driveline Applications

2010-10-05
2010-01-2008
Recent studies have shown that hydraulic hybrid drivelines can significantly improve fuel savings for medium weight vehicles on stop-start drive cycles. In a series hydraulic hybrid (SHH) architecture, the conventional mechanical driveline is replaced with a hydraulic driveline that decouples vehicle speed from engine speed. In an effort to increase the design space, this paper explores the use of a fixed displacement checkball piston pump in an SHH driveline. This paper identifies the potential life-limiting components of a fixed displacement checkball piston pump and examines the likelihood of surface fatigue in the check valves themselves. Numerical analysis in ABAQUS software suggests that under worst case operating conditions, cyclic pressure loading will result in low-cycle plastic deformation of check valve surfaces.
Technical Paper

Downspeeding and Supercharging a Diesel Passenger Car for Increased Fuel Economy

2012-04-16
2012-01-0704
The effects of downspeeding and supercharging a passenger car diesel engine were studied through laboratory investigation and vehicle simulation. Changes in the engine operating range, transmission gearing, and shift schedule resulted in improved fuel consumption relative to the baseline turbocharged vehicle while maintaining performance and drivability metrics. A shift schedule optimization technique resulted in fuel economy gains of up to 12% along with a corresponding reduction in transmission shift frequency of up to 55% relative to the baseline turbocharged configuration. First gear acceleration, top gear passing, and 0-60 mph acceleration of the baseline turbocharged vehicle were retained for the downsped supercharged configuration.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating for a Switching Roller Finger Follower

2012-09-24
2012-01-1964
An advanced variable valve actuation system is developed that requires a coating with high stress loading capability on the sliding interfaces to enable compact packaging solutions for gasoline passenger car applications. The valvetrain system consists of a switching roller bearing finger follower (SRFF) combined with a dual feed hydraulic lash adjuster and an oil control valve. The SRFF contains two slider pads and a single roller to provide discrete variable valve lift capability on the intake valves. These components are installed on a four cylinder gasoline engine. The motivation for designing this type of variable valve actuation system is targeted to improve fuel economy by reducing the air pumping losses during partial load engine operation. This paper addresses the technology developed to utilize a Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on the slider pads of the SRFF.
Technical Paper

Switching Roller Finger Follower Meets Lifetime Passenger Car Durability Requirements

2012-09-10
2012-01-1640
An advanced variable valve actuation (VVA) system is characterized following end-of-life testing to enable fuel economy solutions for passenger car applications. The system consists of a switching roller finger follower (SRFF) combined with a dual feed hydraulic lash adjuster and an oil control valve that are integrated into a four cylinder gasoline engine. The SRFF provides discrete valve lift capability on the intake valves. The motivation for designing this type of VVA system is targeted to improve fuel economy by reducing the air pumping losses during part load engine operation. This paper addresses the durability of a SRFF for meeting passenger car durability requirements. Extensive durability tests were conducted for high speed, low speed, switching, and cold start operation. High engine speed test results show stable valvetrain dynamics above 7000 engine rpm. System wear requirements met end-of-life criteria for the switching, sliding, rolling and torsion spring interfaces.
Technical Paper

Nonlinear Modeling of an Electromagnetic Valve Actuator

2006-04-03
2006-01-0043
This paper presents the modeling of an Electromagnetic Valve Actuator (EMV). A nonlinear model is formulated and presented that takes into account secondary nonlinearities like hysteresis, saturation, bounce and mutual inductance. The uniqueness of the model is contained in the method used in modeling hysteresis, saturation and mutual inductance. Theoretical and experimental methods for identifying parameters of the model are presented. The nonlinear model is experimentally validated. Simulation and experimental results are presented for an EMV designed and built in our laboratory. The experimental results show that sensorless estimation could be a possible solution for position control.
Technical Paper

Stress Analysis of an Automotive Engine Valve by Finite Element Methods

2006-04-03
2006-01-0017
A detailed study, by finite element method (FEM), was conducted on an automotive engine exhaust valve subject to various loads (i.e. spring load, combustion pressure load, temperature profile and valve impact closing velocity). The 3D nonlinear (contact element and temperature-dependent) thermal-mechanical model was constructed and implicit time integration method was employed in transient dynamics under impact velocity. The predicted temperatures and maximum valve stress under impact velocity via FEM were compared with the measured test data, which were in good agreement. In addition, this study finds that the energy transfer during valve closing in normal engine operation is mainly conservative, and a linear relation exists between valve closing velocity and maximum stem stress, that was also confirmed by both test data and analytical expression presented using elastic wave and vibration theory.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Life Assessment on an Automotive Engine Exhaust Valve

2006-04-03
2006-01-0977
This paper presents the fatigue life assessment work on an engine exhaust valve subject to specified durability test cycles. Using valve stress (or strain) data from finite element methods, material fatigue data, and fatigue prediction models (i.e. SN approach and εN approach based on multi-axial Brown-Miller critical plane method), the valve life estimates were obtained and compared with the observed test data, which were in reasonable agreement. In addition, crack growth approach was used and valve crack propagation life including early stage growth was computed. Finally, a general discussion on three life estimates (i.e. fatigue total life, strain-life and crack growth life) was provided with their governing equation, supported by three real cases.
Technical Paper

Gear Design for Low Whine Noise in a Supercharger Application

2007-05-15
2007-01-2293
Supercharger gear whine noise has been a NVH concern for many years, especially around idle rpm. The engine masking noise is very low at idle and the supercharger is sensitive to transmitted gear whine noise from the timing gears. The low loads and desire to use spur gears for ease in timing the rotors have caused the need to make very accurate profiles for minimizing gear whine noise. Over the past several years there has been an effort to better understand gear whine noise source and transmission path. Based on understanding the shaft bending mode frequencies and better gear design optimization tools, the gear design was modified to increase the number of teeth in order to move out of the frequency range of the shaft bending modes at idle speed and to lower the transmission error of the gear design through optimization using the RMC (Run Many Cases) software from the OSU gear laboratory.
Technical Paper

Gear Transmission Error Metric for Use with Gear Inspection Machine

2003-05-05
2003-01-1663
The spur timing gears in Eaton superchargers operate at low torque loads and the supercharger system is especially sensitive to gear whine noise created by minute differences in the spur gear tooth profile quality. This has necessitated the grinding of very high quality profiles on high-contact-ratio spur gears. The manufacturing operation has used subjective evaluation of profile and lead measurements to qualify grinder diamonds and audit gear quality related to noise. They have also relied on supercharger end-of-line-testers to provide a direct measurement of gear noise as the primary quality feedback to the gear manufacturing process. Since the difference in the inspection plots of very high quality profiles is difficult to determine subjectively, the inspection process assessments have been difficult to correlate to the resultant gear noise measurements.
Technical Paper

Timing Gear Whine Noise Reduction Methodology and Application in Superchargers

2005-05-16
2005-01-2450
Extensive experimental and numerical investigations were done to improve the vibration and acoustic performance due to excitation at the timing gears of automotive supercharger. Gear excitation, system response, and covers have been studied to find the most cost efficient method for reducing gear whine noise. Initially, gear excitation was studied where it was found that transmission error due to profile quality was the dominant source parameter for gear whine noise. To investigate the system effects on gear noise, a parametric study was carried using FEM model of the supercharger, with special interests in optimizing dynamic characteristics of internal components and the coupling to supercharger housing. The BEM model of the corresponding supercharger was built to predict the noise improvement after dynamic optimization of the system. Good correlations were observed between experimental and numerical results in both dynamic and acoustic parameters.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Analysis Methodology for Predicting Engine Valve Life

2003-03-03
2003-01-0726
Using FEM (Finite Element Method) and other analytical approaches, a systematic methodology was developed to predict an engine valve's fatigue life. In this study, a steel (SAE 21-2N) exhaust valve on an engine with a type 2 valve train configuration was used as a test case. Temperature and stress/strain responses of each major event phase of the engine cycle were analytically simulated. CFD models were developed to simulate the exhaust gas flow to generate boundary conditions for a thermal model of the valve. FEM simulations accounted for thermal loads, temperature dependent material properties, thermal stresses, closing impact stresses and combustion load stresses. An estimated fatigue life was calculated using Miner's rule of damage accumulation in conjunction with the Modified Goodman approach for fluctuating stresses. Predicted life results correlated very well with empirical tests.
Technical Paper

Simulation of an Engine Valve Stress/Strain Response During a Closing Event

2003-03-03
2003-01-0727
Using an implicit transient FEA models of an intake engine valve, the dynamic stress/strain response of a valve closing (impact) on the valve seat was simulated. Key dynamic events during the closing process were identified and their corresponding physics accounted for in the model including: valve seat contact, valve tilt, rocker arm separation, material properties, shock wave and stem seal damping. Empirical tests were conducted to characterize the stem seal damping as a function of valve stem velocity. In addition, a simplified dynamics equation approach was developed. The results were successfully correlated to recorded strain gauge data.
Technical Paper

Effect of Intake Valve Profile Modulation on Passenger Car Fuel Consumption

2018-04-03
2018-01-0379
Variable valve actuation is a focus to improve fuel efficiency for passenger car engines. Various means to implement early and late intake valve closing (E/LIVC) at lower load operating conditions is investigated. The study uses GT Power to simulate on E/LIVC on a 2.5 L gasoline engine, in-line four cylinder, four valve per cylinder engine to evaluate different ways to achieve Atkinson cycle performance. EIVC and LIVC are proven methods to reduce the compression-to-expansion ratio of the engine at part load and medium load operation. Among the LIVC strategies, two non-traditional intake valve lift profiles are investigated to understand their impact on reduction of fuel consumption at low engine loads. Both the non-traditional lift profiles retain the same maximum lift as a normal intake valve profile (Otto-cycle) unlike a traditional LIVC profile (Atkinson cycle) which needs higher maximum lift.
Journal Article

Valve Guide for High Temperature Applications

2008-04-14
2008-01-1110
Sintered valve guides are increasingly used in various engine applications due to their superior durability and cost. Typical valve guide materials are low alloyed materials of the type Fe-Cu-C. More severe applications may require higher alloying content. One such application is EGR where the exhaust temperatures are much higher as compared to the conventional automotive valve guide. A new material was developed to work in this harsh environment. The object of this paper is to report development of this material including material properties and durability test results.
Technical Paper

Engine Braking: A Perspective in Terms of Brake Power

2019-01-09
2019-26-0288
Engine braking is a supplemental retarding technology in addition to foundational friction brakes in commercial vehicles. This technology is in use in Europe & Americas for several decades now. In engine braking, the engine acts as a compressor, thus producing the required braking power. The braking power is generated by either reducing the volumetric efficiency or increasing the pressure difference across the cylinder. This is usually achieved by means of exhaust valve lift modulation. There are dominantly two types of engine brakes viz. bleeder brake and compression release brake. The present work uses GT-Power® model to study the braking performance of a 4-cylinder, medium duty diesel engine at different engine RPMs and valve lifts. The work brings out a comprehensive understanding of different lift events and their effects on braking performance.
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