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Technical Paper

Soot Structure in a Conventional Non-Premixed Diesel Flame

2006-04-03
2006-01-0196
An analysis of the soot formation and oxidation process in a conventional direct-injection (DI) diesel flame was conducted using numerical simulations. An improved multi-step phenomenological soot model that includes particle inception, particle coagulation, surface growth and oxidation was used to describe the soot formation and oxidation process. The soot model has been implemented into the KIVA-3V code. Other model Improvements include a piston-ring crevice model, a KH/RT spray breakup model, a droplet wall impingement model, a wall-temperature heat transfer model, and the RNG k-ε turbulence model. The Shell model was used to simulate the ignition process, and a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model was used for the post-ignition combustion process. Experimental data from a heavy-duty, Cummins N14, research DI diesel engine operated with conventional injection under low-load conditions were selected as a benchmark.
Technical Paper

Comparison of HCCI Operating Ranges for Combinations of Intake Temperature, Engine Speed and Fuel Composition

2002-06-03
2002-01-1924
A series of engine experiments have been performed to explore the impact intake temperature, engine speed and fuel composition on the HCCI operating range of a CFR engine. The experimental matrix covers a range of engine speeds 600 - 2000 RPM), intake temperatures (300 K - 400 K), and four different fuels. Three of the fuels had different chemical composition but had equivalent research octane numbers of 91.8. The fourth fuel, a blend of primary reference fuels had a research octane number of 70. The acceptable HCCI operating range of the engine was defined through two criteria; the rate of pressure rise needed to be less than 10 MPa per crank angle and the covariance of the indicated mean effective pressure needed to be less than 10 percent. Using these limits the HCCI operating range for the engine was evaluated for the experimental matrix. Data for emissions, and fuel consumption as well as in-cylinder pressure were recorded.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of EGR and Injection Pressure on Soot Formation in a High-Speed Direct-Injection (HSDI) Diesel Engine Using a Multi-Step Phenomenological Soot Model

2005-04-11
2005-01-0121
Low-temperature combustion concepts that utilize cooled EGR, early/retarded injection, high swirl ratios, and modest compression ratios have recently received considerable attention. To understand the combustion and, in particular, the soot formation process under these operating conditions, a modeling study was carried out using the KIVA-3V code with an improved phenomenological soot model. This multi-step soot model includes particle inception, surface growth, surface oxidation, and particle coagulation. Additional models include a piston-ring crevice model, the KH/RT spray breakup model, a droplet wall impingement model, a wall heat transfer model, and the RNG k-ε turbulence model. The Shell model was used to simulate the ignition process, and a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model was used for the post-ignition combustion process.
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