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Technical Paper

Single Vehicle Wet Road Loss of Control; Effects of Tire Tread Depth and Placement

2002-03-04
2002-01-0553
When an automobile is driven on wet roads, its tires must remove water from between the tread and road surfaces. It is well known that the ability of a tire to remove water depends heavily on tread depth, water depth and speed, as well as other factors, such as tire load, air pressure and tread design. It is less well known that tire tread depth combined with placement can have an adverse effect on vehicle handling on wet roads. This paper investigates passenger car handling on wet roads. Flat bed tire testing, three-dimensional computer simulation and skid pad experimental testing are used to determine how handling is affected by tire tread depth and front/rear position of low-tread-depth tires on the vehicle. Some skid pad test results are given, along with corresponding simulations. A literature review also is presented. Significant changes in tire-road longitudinal and lateral friction are shown to occur as speed, tread depth and water depth vary, even before hydroplaning occurs.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the Way EDCRASH Computes Delta-V

1987-02-01
870045
The two procedures, DAMAGE and OBLIQUE IMPACT, which are used by EDCRASH for computing delta-V, are described in detail. Enhancements in EDCRASH Version 4 which improve the DAMAGE method of computing delta-V are also described. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are explored, and the numerical and graphical output and use of warning messages are reviewed. In general, it was found the two methods are complimentary: The DAMAGE procedure is best-suited for the conditions in which the OBLIQUE IMPACT procedure is least-suited, and vice-versa.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the Way EDSMAC Computes Delta-V

1988-02-01
880069
The EDSMAC personal computer program for use by accident investigators is described. The input data requirements are reviewed. The general calculation procedures are discussed and the specific procedures for computing delta-V are explained in detail. The method, based on equalizing the force between the vehicles at all times during the impact phase, is seen to be simple in concept but extremely complex in practice. The numerical and graphical output and warning messages are reviewed. Applications of the program are illustrated. The major benefit of EDSMAC is the ability, using graphics, to provide an analytical method illustrating how an accident may, or may not, have occurred.
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